Memorial Altars

입력 2014.04.29 (15:04) 수정 2014.04.29 (19:52)

읽어주기 기능은 크롬기반의
브라우저에서만 사용하실 수 있습니다.

[Anchor Lead]

Fourteen days have passed since the Sewol ferry disaster rocked the nation. Memorial altars in honor of the souls lost aboard the ship can be found across the country.

[Pkg]

Koreans pack a group memorial altar set up in Daejeon. Mourners, many of them in tears, took time out of their busy schedules to visit the altar. They lament that offering flowers are the only thing they can do for the deceased.

[Soundbite] LEE MI-HYANG (Mourner): "They died because they listened to the grownups and stayed inside. I'm sorry and ashamed."

Students who came by the altar after their midterms prayed for their peers who would have been scared and in agony in their last moments.

[Soundbite] CHU JI-SU (Student, High School): "They're the same age as me. Although they're dead, I think they're looking down at us now. I prayed for them to have peace in heaven."

A volunteer who had helped out the victims' families in Jindo Island came to the memorial station to work as a crowd control personnel and share their sorrow.

[Soundbite] GANG WON-BEOM (Volunteer): "I heard many heartbreaking stories. I came to help people pay their condolences in an orderly fashion in North Jeolla Province."

Memorial altars have been set up all over the nation so that Koreans, regardless of where they are, can pay respect for the victims and urge that no tragic catastrophe like the recent accident would ever happen again.

2. Coast Guard Video

[Anchor Lead]

A video released by the Korean Coast Guard depicts the first moments of their rescue operation at the listing Sewol ferry. The footage clearly shows the ship’s crew being rescued, but no passengers on deck.

[Pkg]

Upon receiving the news of a ferry accident, Coast Guard patrol ship number 123 rushes to the scene.

[Soundbite] Jindo VTS: "A patrol boat will arrive within 10 minutes. "

[Soundbite] The Sewol: "Will arrive in 10 minutes?"

[Soundbite] Jindo VTS: "Yes, it will take just about 10 minutes. 10 minutes!"

At 9:35 a.m., the patrol ship dispatches a rescue boat as soon as it arrives at the accident site. Rescue helicopters are seen hovering over the half-sunken ferry. But not even a single passenger is on the deck outside waiting for help. It's so deserted that it's hard to believe that the ferry is carrying 476 people. That's because most of the passengers, including over 300 Danwon High School students, were waiting in their cabins as they were instructed.

[Soundbite] Loudspeaker Announcement in the Ferry (9:28 a.m.): "Don't move from your current location. Don't move. If you do, it might be more dangerous."

Even then, not all the cabins from the third through the fifth decks were submerged. If they were ordered to abandon ship, many of them would have evacuated into the sea and saved themselves. In fact, one passenger from the fourth deck, spotting a rescue boat nearby, is seen jumping into the water. The Coast Guard claimed that it was difficult to enter the ferry's interior because it had already rolled over at a sharp angle, so they had issued an evacuation order from outside the ferry.

[Soundbite] KIM GYEONG-IL (Captain, Coast Guard Patrol Vessel No. 123): "I did broadcast several announcements over the patrol ship's loudspeaker system, ordering the passengers to abandon ship and jump into the sea."

The heartbreaking video clearly shows that there was ample time and opportunities to save countless lives only if the passengers had been out on the deck.

3. Abandoned Ship

[Anchor Lead]

Now for more analysis of the Coast Guard footage, the ship’s captain is clearly seen abandoning ship in his underpants ahead of the ship’s passengers. Other crew members escaped through an emergency route that only they were aware of.

[Pkg]

At 9:38 a.m., when rescue operations began in earnest, some of the Sewol passengers were jumping off the ship into the sea. Just then one person began exiting the ship in the "Staff only" section of the bow in his underpants. He was the first one to be rescued from the capsizing ferry. That person is none other than the captain Lee Joon-seok of the doomed ferry. As soon as he safely boarded a rescue boat, he rushed to its center to stay as far away from water as possible. The other crew also escaped from the sinking ferry. The fact that the crew used ropes that had been prepared in advance and were carrying walkie-talkies in their hands has prompted many to suspect that the Sewol crew contacted one another during the escape. Instead of jumping into the sea and breaking window glasses to save the passengers, these people just watched the rescue operations from afar. They ran for their own lives without looking back.

[Soundbite] LEE JOON-SEOK (Captain, Ferry Sewol): "I did order the passengers to escape."

The condemning video evidence directly contradicts the accounts of the Sewol crew.

4. Rescue Crew Efforts

[Anchor Lead]

As the Sewol crew abandoned ship, rescue workers on the scene boarded the sinking ferry in an attempt to release the ship’s life rafts. Take
a look.

[Pkg]

The captain and some of the crew of the doomed Sewol ferry were the first ones to escape from the sinking ship instead of rescuing passengers. Just when they were running for their lives, one coastguard official was struggling to launch a life raft. He had been trying to launch it even before the crew's escape. He pulled out the safety pins and kicked the boat in an attempt to deploy it. But launching the raft is actually the crew's responsibility. While the coastguard official was doing his best to save the lives of the passengers, the crew of the sinking ship were busy saving their own.

5. Video Questions

[Anchor Lead]

One day after a KBS report urged the Coast Guard to release footage from the first moments of the rescue efforts, the Coast Guard delivered. But questions remain about why it took so long for this dramatic video to be made public.

[Pkg]

This is a video footage of the initial rescue taken from a Coast Guard helicopter.

[Soundbite] "Thank you, thank you."

The Coast Guard had released this video clip on the first day of the ferry disaster. But another video filmed from a Coast Guard patrol ship was made public yesterday, 13 days after the incident.

[Soundbite] Coast Guard Official (Voice Modified): "This video went straight from the 123 patrol boat to the joint investigation headquarters. We received nothing from the Coast Guard's West Regional Headquarters."

That means the video was not with the Coast Guard, but with the joint investigation headquarters. The Coast Guard source claims that the Coast Guard received the video file recently from the investigators and it was the investigation team's decision to make it public.

[Soundbite] Coast Guard Official (Voice Modified): "There were suspicions about why we're not releasing the video. We have nothing to hide, so I think the investigation headquarters decided to make it public."

But the joint investigation headquarters tells a different story. It is true the video was voluntarily submitted by the Coast Guard for investigation purposes, but it wasn't the investigation team that had decided to release it to the public. The video has been aired, but it still isn't clear who decided to make the video public. To compound the confusion, allegations have been raised that the video has been edited. In a set of photos released a few days ago, four are not shown in the video footage. Those pictures missing from the video clip include the captain getting out of the wheelhouse and a crew member jumping onto the rescue boat. The Coast Guard explained that the released photos had not been captured from the video footage, but had been taken separately while videotaping the scene. The Coast Guard's video contains important information needed to determine whether the Coast Guard's rescue attempts had been appropriate. But questions remain over who made the decision to make the video public and why now.

6. Operator Summons

[Anchor Lead]

Prosecutors will summon the CEO of Sewol operator Chonghaejin Marine Company on Tuesday. The true owner of the company, Yoo Byung-eon, will also likely be summoned this week.

[Pkg]

Prosecutors will question Kim on the flow of capital owned by Yoo and his family. The prosecution has made it clear that Kim will be grilled as a close aide to Yoo rather than as the head of Chonghaejin. Prosecutors plan to subpoena Yoo and his family this week after questioning his seven aides. Prosecutors raided a business consulting firm owned by Yoo and his two sons to obtain more evidence before interrogating them.

[Soundbite] Company Official (Voice Modified): "(I want to ask you about the raids.) I have nothing to say."

Businesses owned by the Yoo family gave more than 19 million U.S. dollars to three consulting companies, including the one that was raided, in consulting fees. Prosecutors believe that they are paper companies used for money laundering. But the Yoo family has denied the suspicions, saying that the firms just received consulting fees. However, the family's explanation indicates that Yoo played a substantial role in the management of affiliates. Prosecutors are said to have obtained evidence of Yoo's involvement in managing the companies and creation of secret funds through an accounting company.

7. Suspicious Loans

[Anchor Lead]

Suspicions over illegal loans provided to the owner and operating company of the Sewol ferry continue to rise in the wake of the disaster. Financial authorities have launched a special probe into institutions that might have played a role.

[Pkg]

Chonghaejin Marine Company imported the Sewol ferry from Japan in 2012 and spent over 14 million U.S. dollars on its remodeling to expand its capacity. Of that, around 9.6 million dollars, or two-thirds of the amount, were borrowed from the Korea Development Bank. Around 7.7 million dollars were borrowed for purchasing the ship, while the remaining 1.9 million for its remodeling. The question is whether the loan was obtained legally. If Chonghaejin Marine Company went bankrupt and had to sell the Sewol at an auction, its liquidating value would be 7.5 million dollars, which is 2.1 million less than the amount of the received loan. What's more, when the bank provided the loan, it issued loan monitoring for the company because of its financial risks. In 2011, the year before Chonghaejin Marine received the loan, it posted a deficit of more than one million dollars, which significantly undermined its credibility.

[Soundbite] Bank Official (Voice Modified): "The credibility must be monitored constantly. Loan monitoring is issued when a red flag is raised."

However, the Korea Development Bank granted Chonghaejin Marine's request for a loan.

[Soundbite] Korea Development Bank Official (Voice Modified): "Tourism on Jeju Island was thriving. So the company thought it would increase its revenues by operating a ferry. Raising transportation fees was also an issue."

The allegation of illegal loans has spread to other banks as well. Saemuri, an affiliate run by the owner of the Sewol ferry Yoo Byung-eon, received a collateral-free loan amounting to 21.5 million U.S. dollars from the Industrial Bank of Korea and the National Agricultural Cooperative Federation in 2008. The money was used to acquire the Semo Group, which at the time was under court receivership. The Financial Supervisory Service are investigating the affiliates of Chonghaejin Marine and financial institutions that provided loans.

8. Japan Pays Respects

[Anchor Lead]

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and other Cabinet members have paid their respects to the victims of the sunken ferry. Here’s the story.

[Pkg]

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe laid a flower on a memorial altar for the victims of the ill-fated Sewol, which was set up at the headquarters of the Korean Residents Union in Japan, known as Mindan. He made an unscheduled visit to the memorial ahead of his trip to Europe.

[Soundbite] SHINZO ABE (Japanese Prime Minister): "I again extend my condolences to the victims and their families."

Prior to the visit, the Japanese prime minister said that the thought of the sex slavery victims deeply pains him. The remarks are a far cry from his previous stance denying Japan's conscription of sex slaves. Japan's Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida and Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga also visited the memorial and mourned the death of the ferry passengers. In particular, the Japanese foreign minister said that the Japanese are ready to help South Korea in overcoming the tragedy. At the memorial, a board is full of messages in respect for the victims of the Sewol sinking. However, Japan's Administrative Reform Minister Tomomi Inada paid a visit to the Yasukuni Shrine honoring Japanese war dead and class-A war criminals on Monday. Her visit overshadowed the meaning of the San Francisco Peace Treaty between Japan and allied powers, which took effect on April 28th, 1952.

9. Ferry Safety

[Anchor Lead]

Concerns over ferry safety are on the rise on the eastern coast of Korea in the wake of the Sewol tragedy. It’s been discovered that many ferries are experiencing engine issues.

[Pkg]

A passenger ferry that can accommodate up to 985 people is stranded at a port. One of its four engines is broken because fishing ropes got tangled inside.

[Soundbite] LEE SU-WON (Ferry Operator): "When the ship passes over ropes or even next to them, it sucks them up, which causes accidents."

The ferry has experienced technical problems six times this year alone because of discarded items such as fishing nets floating in the sea.

[Soundbite] YEO YONG-DAE (Chief, Ferry Operating Company): "We have to be careful because of discarded items and other objects in the sea."

This passenger ferry that can accommodate more than 900 people almost hits the ocean floor each time it arrives at the port. The depth should be at least 3.5 meters for the ferry to operate safely, but the water at this port is too shallow because of the piles of sand.

[Soundbite] CHA SEUNG (Ferry Captain): "I have to turn the propeller using a clutch because the water is so shallow, but that stirs up the sand and the water becomes too murky."

Any technical glitches on ships operating in the East Sea can result in disasters because of the deep waters and strong winds.

10. Safety Checks

[Anchor Lead]

The government has conducted emergency safety checks on some 4,000 social overhead capital facilities. The inspections reveal many problems. Let’s take a look.

[Pkg]

This is a device that blocks traffic in case a fire break out inside the tunnel. It is in proper working condition. Fire extinguishers are inspected. Inspectors check an emergency phone.

[Soundbite] "(I’m checking the system.) OK. Thank you."

They also check the emergency doors. It took only 15 minutes to inspect the tunnel and its safety facilities.

[Soundbite] "(Is that all for today?) Yes, today's check is over."

A safety check was conducted at Ulsan Airport at the same time. Inspectors checked to see how fast the fire engines arrive and whether the anti-fire doors work properly. The Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport began safety checks on social overhead capital infrastructure on Monday. The ministry pledged to carry out intensive inspections to make sure that those facilities are in good working conditions. However, inspections on the first day fall short of expectations. Some experts say that the ministry should have conducted drills for the people to learn how to operate such safety facilities in the event of an emergency.

[Soundbite] Prof. LEE YEONG-JU (University of Seoul): "People need to know how they can escape by themselves in the event of an emergency. They must be well prepared to survive those emergencies."

The ministry said that the safety checks will continue until mid-May with some one-thousand-200 officials participating.

■ 제보하기
▷ 카카오톡 : 'KBS제보' 검색, 채널 추가
▷ 전화 : 02-781-1234, 4444
▷ 이메일 : kbs1234@kbs.co.kr
▷ 유튜브, 네이버, 카카오에서도 KBS뉴스를 구독해주세요!


  • Memorial Altars
    • 입력 2014-04-29 15:24:39
    • 수정2014-04-29 19:52:33
    News Today
[Anchor Lead]

Fourteen days have passed since the Sewol ferry disaster rocked the nation. Memorial altars in honor of the souls lost aboard the ship can be found across the country.

[Pkg]

Koreans pack a group memorial altar set up in Daejeon. Mourners, many of them in tears, took time out of their busy schedules to visit the altar. They lament that offering flowers are the only thing they can do for the deceased.

[Soundbite] LEE MI-HYANG (Mourner): "They died because they listened to the grownups and stayed inside. I'm sorry and ashamed."

Students who came by the altar after their midterms prayed for their peers who would have been scared and in agony in their last moments.

[Soundbite] CHU JI-SU (Student, High School): "They're the same age as me. Although they're dead, I think they're looking down at us now. I prayed for them to have peace in heaven."

A volunteer who had helped out the victims' families in Jindo Island came to the memorial station to work as a crowd control personnel and share their sorrow.

[Soundbite] GANG WON-BEOM (Volunteer): "I heard many heartbreaking stories. I came to help people pay their condolences in an orderly fashion in North Jeolla Province."

Memorial altars have been set up all over the nation so that Koreans, regardless of where they are, can pay respect for the victims and urge that no tragic catastrophe like the recent accident would ever happen again.

2. Coast Guard Video

[Anchor Lead]

A video released by the Korean Coast Guard depicts the first moments of their rescue operation at the listing Sewol ferry. The footage clearly shows the ship’s crew being rescued, but no passengers on deck.

[Pkg]

Upon receiving the news of a ferry accident, Coast Guard patrol ship number 123 rushes to the scene.

[Soundbite] Jindo VTS: "A patrol boat will arrive within 10 minutes. "

[Soundbite] The Sewol: "Will arrive in 10 minutes?"

[Soundbite] Jindo VTS: "Yes, it will take just about 10 minutes. 10 minutes!"

At 9:35 a.m., the patrol ship dispatches a rescue boat as soon as it arrives at the accident site. Rescue helicopters are seen hovering over the half-sunken ferry. But not even a single passenger is on the deck outside waiting for help. It's so deserted that it's hard to believe that the ferry is carrying 476 people. That's because most of the passengers, including over 300 Danwon High School students, were waiting in their cabins as they were instructed.

[Soundbite] Loudspeaker Announcement in the Ferry (9:28 a.m.): "Don't move from your current location. Don't move. If you do, it might be more dangerous."

Even then, not all the cabins from the third through the fifth decks were submerged. If they were ordered to abandon ship, many of them would have evacuated into the sea and saved themselves. In fact, one passenger from the fourth deck, spotting a rescue boat nearby, is seen jumping into the water. The Coast Guard claimed that it was difficult to enter the ferry's interior because it had already rolled over at a sharp angle, so they had issued an evacuation order from outside the ferry.

[Soundbite] KIM GYEONG-IL (Captain, Coast Guard Patrol Vessel No. 123): "I did broadcast several announcements over the patrol ship's loudspeaker system, ordering the passengers to abandon ship and jump into the sea."

The heartbreaking video clearly shows that there was ample time and opportunities to save countless lives only if the passengers had been out on the deck.

3. Abandoned Ship

[Anchor Lead]

Now for more analysis of the Coast Guard footage, the ship’s captain is clearly seen abandoning ship in his underpants ahead of the ship’s passengers. Other crew members escaped through an emergency route that only they were aware of.

[Pkg]

At 9:38 a.m., when rescue operations began in earnest, some of the Sewol passengers were jumping off the ship into the sea. Just then one person began exiting the ship in the "Staff only" section of the bow in his underpants. He was the first one to be rescued from the capsizing ferry. That person is none other than the captain Lee Joon-seok of the doomed ferry. As soon as he safely boarded a rescue boat, he rushed to its center to stay as far away from water as possible. The other crew also escaped from the sinking ferry. The fact that the crew used ropes that had been prepared in advance and were carrying walkie-talkies in their hands has prompted many to suspect that the Sewol crew contacted one another during the escape. Instead of jumping into the sea and breaking window glasses to save the passengers, these people just watched the rescue operations from afar. They ran for their own lives without looking back.

[Soundbite] LEE JOON-SEOK (Captain, Ferry Sewol): "I did order the passengers to escape."

The condemning video evidence directly contradicts the accounts of the Sewol crew.

4. Rescue Crew Efforts

[Anchor Lead]

As the Sewol crew abandoned ship, rescue workers on the scene boarded the sinking ferry in an attempt to release the ship’s life rafts. Take
a look.

[Pkg]

The captain and some of the crew of the doomed Sewol ferry were the first ones to escape from the sinking ship instead of rescuing passengers. Just when they were running for their lives, one coastguard official was struggling to launch a life raft. He had been trying to launch it even before the crew's escape. He pulled out the safety pins and kicked the boat in an attempt to deploy it. But launching the raft is actually the crew's responsibility. While the coastguard official was doing his best to save the lives of the passengers, the crew of the sinking ship were busy saving their own.

5. Video Questions

[Anchor Lead]

One day after a KBS report urged the Coast Guard to release footage from the first moments of the rescue efforts, the Coast Guard delivered. But questions remain about why it took so long for this dramatic video to be made public.

[Pkg]

This is a video footage of the initial rescue taken from a Coast Guard helicopter.

[Soundbite] "Thank you, thank you."

The Coast Guard had released this video clip on the first day of the ferry disaster. But another video filmed from a Coast Guard patrol ship was made public yesterday, 13 days after the incident.

[Soundbite] Coast Guard Official (Voice Modified): "This video went straight from the 123 patrol boat to the joint investigation headquarters. We received nothing from the Coast Guard's West Regional Headquarters."

That means the video was not with the Coast Guard, but with the joint investigation headquarters. The Coast Guard source claims that the Coast Guard received the video file recently from the investigators and it was the investigation team's decision to make it public.

[Soundbite] Coast Guard Official (Voice Modified): "There were suspicions about why we're not releasing the video. We have nothing to hide, so I think the investigation headquarters decided to make it public."

But the joint investigation headquarters tells a different story. It is true the video was voluntarily submitted by the Coast Guard for investigation purposes, but it wasn't the investigation team that had decided to release it to the public. The video has been aired, but it still isn't clear who decided to make the video public. To compound the confusion, allegations have been raised that the video has been edited. In a set of photos released a few days ago, four are not shown in the video footage. Those pictures missing from the video clip include the captain getting out of the wheelhouse and a crew member jumping onto the rescue boat. The Coast Guard explained that the released photos had not been captured from the video footage, but had been taken separately while videotaping the scene. The Coast Guard's video contains important information needed to determine whether the Coast Guard's rescue attempts had been appropriate. But questions remain over who made the decision to make the video public and why now.

6. Operator Summons

[Anchor Lead]

Prosecutors will summon the CEO of Sewol operator Chonghaejin Marine Company on Tuesday. The true owner of the company, Yoo Byung-eon, will also likely be summoned this week.

[Pkg]

Prosecutors will question Kim on the flow of capital owned by Yoo and his family. The prosecution has made it clear that Kim will be grilled as a close aide to Yoo rather than as the head of Chonghaejin. Prosecutors plan to subpoena Yoo and his family this week after questioning his seven aides. Prosecutors raided a business consulting firm owned by Yoo and his two sons to obtain more evidence before interrogating them.

[Soundbite] Company Official (Voice Modified): "(I want to ask you about the raids.) I have nothing to say."

Businesses owned by the Yoo family gave more than 19 million U.S. dollars to three consulting companies, including the one that was raided, in consulting fees. Prosecutors believe that they are paper companies used for money laundering. But the Yoo family has denied the suspicions, saying that the firms just received consulting fees. However, the family's explanation indicates that Yoo played a substantial role in the management of affiliates. Prosecutors are said to have obtained evidence of Yoo's involvement in managing the companies and creation of secret funds through an accounting company.

7. Suspicious Loans

[Anchor Lead]

Suspicions over illegal loans provided to the owner and operating company of the Sewol ferry continue to rise in the wake of the disaster. Financial authorities have launched a special probe into institutions that might have played a role.

[Pkg]

Chonghaejin Marine Company imported the Sewol ferry from Japan in 2012 and spent over 14 million U.S. dollars on its remodeling to expand its capacity. Of that, around 9.6 million dollars, or two-thirds of the amount, were borrowed from the Korea Development Bank. Around 7.7 million dollars were borrowed for purchasing the ship, while the remaining 1.9 million for its remodeling. The question is whether the loan was obtained legally. If Chonghaejin Marine Company went bankrupt and had to sell the Sewol at an auction, its liquidating value would be 7.5 million dollars, which is 2.1 million less than the amount of the received loan. What's more, when the bank provided the loan, it issued loan monitoring for the company because of its financial risks. In 2011, the year before Chonghaejin Marine received the loan, it posted a deficit of more than one million dollars, which significantly undermined its credibility.

[Soundbite] Bank Official (Voice Modified): "The credibility must be monitored constantly. Loan monitoring is issued when a red flag is raised."

However, the Korea Development Bank granted Chonghaejin Marine's request for a loan.

[Soundbite] Korea Development Bank Official (Voice Modified): "Tourism on Jeju Island was thriving. So the company thought it would increase its revenues by operating a ferry. Raising transportation fees was also an issue."

The allegation of illegal loans has spread to other banks as well. Saemuri, an affiliate run by the owner of the Sewol ferry Yoo Byung-eon, received a collateral-free loan amounting to 21.5 million U.S. dollars from the Industrial Bank of Korea and the National Agricultural Cooperative Federation in 2008. The money was used to acquire the Semo Group, which at the time was under court receivership. The Financial Supervisory Service are investigating the affiliates of Chonghaejin Marine and financial institutions that provided loans.

8. Japan Pays Respects

[Anchor Lead]

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and other Cabinet members have paid their respects to the victims of the sunken ferry. Here’s the story.

[Pkg]

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe laid a flower on a memorial altar for the victims of the ill-fated Sewol, which was set up at the headquarters of the Korean Residents Union in Japan, known as Mindan. He made an unscheduled visit to the memorial ahead of his trip to Europe.

[Soundbite] SHINZO ABE (Japanese Prime Minister): "I again extend my condolences to the victims and their families."

Prior to the visit, the Japanese prime minister said that the thought of the sex slavery victims deeply pains him. The remarks are a far cry from his previous stance denying Japan's conscription of sex slaves. Japan's Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida and Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga also visited the memorial and mourned the death of the ferry passengers. In particular, the Japanese foreign minister said that the Japanese are ready to help South Korea in overcoming the tragedy. At the memorial, a board is full of messages in respect for the victims of the Sewol sinking. However, Japan's Administrative Reform Minister Tomomi Inada paid a visit to the Yasukuni Shrine honoring Japanese war dead and class-A war criminals on Monday. Her visit overshadowed the meaning of the San Francisco Peace Treaty between Japan and allied powers, which took effect on April 28th, 1952.

9. Ferry Safety

[Anchor Lead]

Concerns over ferry safety are on the rise on the eastern coast of Korea in the wake of the Sewol tragedy. It’s been discovered that many ferries are experiencing engine issues.

[Pkg]

A passenger ferry that can accommodate up to 985 people is stranded at a port. One of its four engines is broken because fishing ropes got tangled inside.

[Soundbite] LEE SU-WON (Ferry Operator): "When the ship passes over ropes or even next to them, it sucks them up, which causes accidents."

The ferry has experienced technical problems six times this year alone because of discarded items such as fishing nets floating in the sea.

[Soundbite] YEO YONG-DAE (Chief, Ferry Operating Company): "We have to be careful because of discarded items and other objects in the sea."

This passenger ferry that can accommodate more than 900 people almost hits the ocean floor each time it arrives at the port. The depth should be at least 3.5 meters for the ferry to operate safely, but the water at this port is too shallow because of the piles of sand.

[Soundbite] CHA SEUNG (Ferry Captain): "I have to turn the propeller using a clutch because the water is so shallow, but that stirs up the sand and the water becomes too murky."

Any technical glitches on ships operating in the East Sea can result in disasters because of the deep waters and strong winds.

10. Safety Checks

[Anchor Lead]

The government has conducted emergency safety checks on some 4,000 social overhead capital facilities. The inspections reveal many problems. Let’s take a look.

[Pkg]

This is a device that blocks traffic in case a fire break out inside the tunnel. It is in proper working condition. Fire extinguishers are inspected. Inspectors check an emergency phone.

[Soundbite] "(I’m checking the system.) OK. Thank you."

They also check the emergency doors. It took only 15 minutes to inspect the tunnel and its safety facilities.

[Soundbite] "(Is that all for today?) Yes, today's check is over."

A safety check was conducted at Ulsan Airport at the same time. Inspectors checked to see how fast the fire engines arrive and whether the anti-fire doors work properly. The Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport began safety checks on social overhead capital infrastructure on Monday. The ministry pledged to carry out intensive inspections to make sure that those facilities are in good working conditions. However, inspections on the first day fall short of expectations. Some experts say that the ministry should have conducted drills for the people to learn how to operate such safety facilities in the event of an emergency.

[Soundbite] Prof. LEE YEONG-JU (University of Seoul): "People need to know how they can escape by themselves in the event of an emergency. They must be well prepared to survive those emergencies."

The ministry said that the safety checks will continue until mid-May with some one-thousand-200 officials participating.

이 기사가 좋으셨다면

오늘의 핫 클릭

실시간 뜨거운 관심을 받고 있는 뉴스

이 기사에 대한 의견을 남겨주세요.

수신료 수신료