NORTH RESTORES MILITARY ACTIONS

입력 2023.11.23 (15:10) 수정 2023.11.23 (16:45)

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NORTH RESTORES MILITARY ACTIONS

[Anchor Lead]
In response to South Korea's partial suspension of the September 19th military agreement, North Korea has announced it will no longer adhere to the accord, reinstating all previously suspended military actions. North Korea again launched a ballistic missile last night.

[Pkg]
After South Korea partially suspended the 2018 inter-Korean military agreement and decided to restore aerial recon activities, North Korea said it will not be restrained by the agreement anymore. In a statement carried by the regime's Korean Central News Agency, the North claimed its spy satellite launch was a justified act of self-defense. It vowed to immediately restore all military measures suspended under the 2018 accord and deploy even stronger armed forces and advanced military equipment to border areas. The North said it won't acknowledge any agreement with the South which ditched a publicly declared commitment with no hesitation, and added Seoul will be solely responsible in the event of a cross-border clash. Meanwhile the regime continued hostile acts Wednesday night. Seoul's Joint Chiefs of Staff said that Pyongyang fired a ballistic missile toward the East Sea at around 11:05 p.m. from the Sunan area. The JCS believes the launch was a failure as intelligence officials in South Korea and the U.S. continue to analyze the event. Earlier, South Korea's defense ministry decided to suspend the validity of Article One, Clause Three of the 2018 agreement as of 3 p.m. Wednesday. The provision relates to designated no-fly zones near the Military Demarcation Line. As a result, surveillance operations against signs of North Korean provocations were restored near the MDL. The ministry called the measure "essential" and a "minimum defensive action" to protect South Korean lives and safety from the North's nuclear and missile threats and provocative acts. Meanwhile, the JCS, citing tracking data, assessed the North's spy satellite launched late Tuesday is believed to have entered into orbit. It said that further analysis by related agencies in coordination with the U.S. is needed to determine whether the satellite is functioning properly.

ROW OVER MILITARY ACCORD HALT

[Anchor Lead]
In a rare show of unity, rival parties condemned North Korea's actions, labeling them a clear violation of the United Nations Security Council's resolutions. However, they show starkly divided opinions on the government's move to resume aerial surveillance and reconnaissance.

[Pkg]
Both sides of the political aisle agree that North Korea clearly violated the UNSC resolution banning the launch of ballistic missiles. But they had different views on the partial suspension of the September 19th inter-Korean military agreement, which the government had explained was the minimum defense measure. The People Power Party argued that the South Korean government cannot sit idly by when North Korea had already violated the agreement and launched a reconnaissance satellite. The ruling party stressed that both sides must reach an agreement in a national security crisis.

[Soundbite]
Kim Gi-hyeon (Chair, People Power Party): The opposition party would be abandoning their basic duty if they neglect ensuring nat’l security. The Democratic Party must wake up.

However, the Democratic Party called the agreement suspension 'the wrong solution' and accused the government of 'giving North Korea a basis for provocation and fueling inter-Korean conflict'. The opposition party said that the existing agreement should be expanded to prevent inadvertent clashes along the border and suspected the latest measure is fraught with political intentions.

[Soundbite]
Lee Jae-myung (Chair, Democratic Party): The people’s safety and peace on the Korean peninsula should not be sacrificed for politically motivated reasons.

Currently, the National Assembly's National Defense Committee meeting is underway where the two sides ask questions about North Korea's reconnaissance satellite launch.

DOWNING STREET ACCORD

[Anchor Lead]
During his state visit to the United Kingdom, President Yoon Suk Yeol met today with Prime Minister Rishi Sunak for a Korea-UK summit. The two leaders officially adopted the 'Downing Street Accord,' aimed at elevating cooperation between the two countries to a new level in various sectors, including security and economy.

[Pkg]
President Yoon Suk Yeol and British Prime Minister Rishi Sunak sat down for talks at 10 Downing Street, the prime minister's residence in London.

[Soundbite]
Yoon Suk Yeol (President): There is nothing us, blood allies, cannot achieve in economic and technological cooperation.

[Soundbite]
Rishi Sunak (British Prime Minister):

In the summit talks, the two sides adopted the Downing Street Accord which upgraded bilateral relations and strengthens cooperation. On security, the two sides agreed to hold more combined drills, conduct joint maritime patrols on enforcing North Korea sanctions and create a foreign and defense ministerial dialogue channel. A separate document on upgrading cooperation in cyber security was also adopted.

[Soundbite]
Kim Tae-hyo (Principal Deputy Nat’l Security Adviser): The agreement lays the foundation to establish a cyber security cooperation network with Five Eyes countries.

This particular agreement is aimed at jointly responding to regional security concerns such as North Korea. It includes calls for Pyongyang to completely dismantle its nuclear program and indicates Britain's support for Seoul's policy on Korean Peninsula affairs. Regarding the economy, the Downing Street Accord calls for the launch of negotiations to enhance the Korea-UK free trade agreement as well as stronger cooperation in semiconductor supply chains and nuclear power and cutting edge high-tech sectors. The accord also includes cooperation on artificial intelligence and quantum, as related research, according to the presidential office, will be utilized for advancing military technology. President Yoon will visit a war museum which used to host former British leader Winston Churchill's wartime Cabinet, before heading to Paris to promote South Korea's 2030 World Expo bid.

DOCTORS PROTEST QUOTA RISE

[Anchor Lead]
Following the government's announcement of medical school enrollment expansion survey results, tensions have risen with the medical community. The doctors' association, criticizing the survey as a public opinion tactic, met with government officials yesterday. However, the meeting concluded in discord, with both sides reaffirming their differing positions and no resolution achieved.

[Pkg]
The government and a doctors' organization sat down together for the first time since the government revealed the survey results on the expansion of medical student enrollment quota. The doctors' organization harshly criticized the government from the start of the meeting.

[Soundbite]
Yang Dong-ho (Gwangju Medical Association): Is the Korean medical association just a pawn the gov’t is reluctantly negotiating with for its quota push?

They insisted that they have discussed the quota increase with the government since early this year but the government has damaged trust by unilaterally announcing the survey results. The doctors' association explained that the survey that focused on medical schools' needs and demand for enrollment expansion was not scientific nor objective. The health ministry rebutted by explaining that it was just a basic survey to collect opinions on the desired quota increase. The ministry also countered that a medical school admission quota should be increased in order to ease shortage in essential medical services.

[Soundbite]
Chung Kyung-sil (Ministry of Health and Welfare): Doctors should accept the public demand for more doctors and acknowledge the reality that there are hospitals closing down due to a shortage.

The meeting ended in just 20 short minutes, as the doctors' side walked out. Although the discussions broke down, the health ministry plans to finalize a medical enrollment quota for the 2025 academic year by early next year at the latest and notify the education ministry. The medical sector is more fiercely opposing the government's move to speed up the quota increase. Since last week, member doctors of the Gyeonggi-do Medical Association have been closing down their clinics and holding rallies every Wednesday. The Koran Intern Resident Association also pledged not to sit back and watch if the government pushes ahead with the quota increase unilaterally. The Korean Medical Association will hold a nationwide representatives' meeting on Sunday to discuss future response including the possibility of strikes.

COSTS TO MAKE KIMCHI DROP

[Anchor Lead]
According to a survey by the Korea Agro-Fisheries & Food Trade Corporation, an average of about 190,000 won was needed to make kimchi with 20 napa cabbages for kimjang, the annual kimchi-making season, as of November 20. This is some 11.7 percent down from last year's costs. The corporation explained that prices for eleven out of 14 kimchi ingredients dropped due to the government's increased supply and super market chains' discount events.

TOUGHER DRUG CRACKDOWNS

[Anchor Lead]
In a significant move to combat the misuse of narcotics, including drugs like Propofol, the government has announced an intensification of its crackdown. In a bid to prevent the entry of narcotics into the country, authorities have also declared the introduction of advanced detection equipment capable of identifying even small quantities of drugs at all national airports.

[Pkg]
Doctor A, his face hidden under a cap, showed up for a warrant review. He was investigated by the prosecutors for prescribing propofol to actor Yoo Ah-in and self-injecting the leftover propofol.

[Soundbite]
(Doctor A): (Do you admit to illegally administering propofol?) ...

In the wake of several narcotic drug cases involving doctors, the government decided to overhaul the entire system.

[Soundbite]
Bang Ki-sun (Minister of Gov’t Policy Coordination): A screening procedure will be set up to stop drug-addicted medical professionals from prescribing drugs to patients or themselves.

When determined to be addicted to drugs, a doctor's license will be revoked and obtaining another license later will be strictly limited. A doctor will be mandated to check a patient's prescription and drug administration records to prevent patients from 'drug shopping' or visiting different hospitals to get multiple prescriptions for narcotic drugs. The government will also take measures to stop drug smuggling at the source. All the carry-ons belonging to travelers from countries with high drug-related crimes will be inspected and body scanners capable of searching the entire body in three seconds will be set up at airports and seaports.

[Soundbite]
Han Chang-ryeong (Korea Customs Service): We'll focus mostly on Southeast Asian and European countries. Crime-heavy nations will be designated based on information from intel authorities.

The recidivism rate of drug crimes is 36%, about 1.5 times higher than other crimes. The government also plans to expand treatment and rehab facilities by opening drug addiction treatment centers all across the nation by next year. Currently, there are rehab centers only in Seoul, Busan and Daejeon.

G-DRAGON TAKES LEGAL ACTION

[Anchor Lead]
Singer Kwon Ji-yong is pursuing legal action against malicious online postings against him. The lawyer for the singer, who is more widely known as G-Dragon, said that they are taking legal action against those who posted malicious comments about him, including defamation, insults, sexual harassment, spreading false information and malicious slander. Kwon tested negative in all tests so far.

SCHOOL CAFETERIA ROBOTS

[Anchor Lead]
Concerns over health hazards from cooking fumes, particularly when preparing food with hot oil, have long been an issue for cafeteria workers. In a groundbreaking response, a middle school in Seoul has introduced a 'cafeteria robot' to handle these cooking processes.

[Pkg]
Batter-coated chicken is placed on a stand. Then a long robot arm dips the basket in sizzling oil. It is fried and then extra oil is shaken off and the fried chicken is ready to be served. In another corner, fried rice is being cooked. All of this cooking is done by robots. In a first for South Korea, cafeteria robots were introduced at this middle school from second semester.

[Soundbite]
Jo Hyeong-chan (3rd year, Soonggok Middle School): I thought robot-made food wouldn’t be as tasty but the fries had perfect, consistent crunch.

Four robots divide up roles such as in deep frying, stir frying and making stews. A one billion won budget went into their development and operation. The robots usually take on laborious or dangerous tasks such as those involving high temperature. After the introduction, 83% of cafeteria staff at the school said their working conditions have improved, with many positive reviews particularly on fried dishes.

[Soundbite]
Kim Hye-yeong (Nutritionist, Soonggok Middle School): Workers stay away from cooking fumes. Robots are great in manual, repetitive work. So, the cafeteria staff are happy with it.

Education authorities drew a line against concerns that robots will take over human jobs.

[Soundbite]
Cho Hee-yeon (Superintendent, Seoul Metropolitan Office of Education): The robots will first serve at schools facing staff shortage. Such concern is groundless as the deployment can be adjusted.

The Seoul Metropolitan Office of Education plans to secure funding and expand the robot scheme to other schools, mainly for the cooking of deep or stir-fried dishes.

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  • NORTH RESTORES MILITARY ACTIONS
    • 입력 2023-11-23 15:10:18
    • 수정2023-11-23 16:45:08
    News Today
NORTH RESTORES MILITARY ACTIONS

[Anchor Lead]
In response to South Korea's partial suspension of the September 19th military agreement, North Korea has announced it will no longer adhere to the accord, reinstating all previously suspended military actions. North Korea again launched a ballistic missile last night.

[Pkg]
After South Korea partially suspended the 2018 inter-Korean military agreement and decided to restore aerial recon activities, North Korea said it will not be restrained by the agreement anymore. In a statement carried by the regime's Korean Central News Agency, the North claimed its spy satellite launch was a justified act of self-defense. It vowed to immediately restore all military measures suspended under the 2018 accord and deploy even stronger armed forces and advanced military equipment to border areas. The North said it won't acknowledge any agreement with the South which ditched a publicly declared commitment with no hesitation, and added Seoul will be solely responsible in the event of a cross-border clash. Meanwhile the regime continued hostile acts Wednesday night. Seoul's Joint Chiefs of Staff said that Pyongyang fired a ballistic missile toward the East Sea at around 11:05 p.m. from the Sunan area. The JCS believes the launch was a failure as intelligence officials in South Korea and the U.S. continue to analyze the event. Earlier, South Korea's defense ministry decided to suspend the validity of Article One, Clause Three of the 2018 agreement as of 3 p.m. Wednesday. The provision relates to designated no-fly zones near the Military Demarcation Line. As a result, surveillance operations against signs of North Korean provocations were restored near the MDL. The ministry called the measure "essential" and a "minimum defensive action" to protect South Korean lives and safety from the North's nuclear and missile threats and provocative acts. Meanwhile, the JCS, citing tracking data, assessed the North's spy satellite launched late Tuesday is believed to have entered into orbit. It said that further analysis by related agencies in coordination with the U.S. is needed to determine whether the satellite is functioning properly.

ROW OVER MILITARY ACCORD HALT

[Anchor Lead]
In a rare show of unity, rival parties condemned North Korea's actions, labeling them a clear violation of the United Nations Security Council's resolutions. However, they show starkly divided opinions on the government's move to resume aerial surveillance and reconnaissance.

[Pkg]
Both sides of the political aisle agree that North Korea clearly violated the UNSC resolution banning the launch of ballistic missiles. But they had different views on the partial suspension of the September 19th inter-Korean military agreement, which the government had explained was the minimum defense measure. The People Power Party argued that the South Korean government cannot sit idly by when North Korea had already violated the agreement and launched a reconnaissance satellite. The ruling party stressed that both sides must reach an agreement in a national security crisis.

[Soundbite]
Kim Gi-hyeon (Chair, People Power Party): The opposition party would be abandoning their basic duty if they neglect ensuring nat’l security. The Democratic Party must wake up.

However, the Democratic Party called the agreement suspension 'the wrong solution' and accused the government of 'giving North Korea a basis for provocation and fueling inter-Korean conflict'. The opposition party said that the existing agreement should be expanded to prevent inadvertent clashes along the border and suspected the latest measure is fraught with political intentions.

[Soundbite]
Lee Jae-myung (Chair, Democratic Party): The people’s safety and peace on the Korean peninsula should not be sacrificed for politically motivated reasons.

Currently, the National Assembly's National Defense Committee meeting is underway where the two sides ask questions about North Korea's reconnaissance satellite launch.

DOWNING STREET ACCORD

[Anchor Lead]
During his state visit to the United Kingdom, President Yoon Suk Yeol met today with Prime Minister Rishi Sunak for a Korea-UK summit. The two leaders officially adopted the 'Downing Street Accord,' aimed at elevating cooperation between the two countries to a new level in various sectors, including security and economy.

[Pkg]
President Yoon Suk Yeol and British Prime Minister Rishi Sunak sat down for talks at 10 Downing Street, the prime minister's residence in London.

[Soundbite]
Yoon Suk Yeol (President): There is nothing us, blood allies, cannot achieve in economic and technological cooperation.

[Soundbite]
Rishi Sunak (British Prime Minister):

In the summit talks, the two sides adopted the Downing Street Accord which upgraded bilateral relations and strengthens cooperation. On security, the two sides agreed to hold more combined drills, conduct joint maritime patrols on enforcing North Korea sanctions and create a foreign and defense ministerial dialogue channel. A separate document on upgrading cooperation in cyber security was also adopted.

[Soundbite]
Kim Tae-hyo (Principal Deputy Nat’l Security Adviser): The agreement lays the foundation to establish a cyber security cooperation network with Five Eyes countries.

This particular agreement is aimed at jointly responding to regional security concerns such as North Korea. It includes calls for Pyongyang to completely dismantle its nuclear program and indicates Britain's support for Seoul's policy on Korean Peninsula affairs. Regarding the economy, the Downing Street Accord calls for the launch of negotiations to enhance the Korea-UK free trade agreement as well as stronger cooperation in semiconductor supply chains and nuclear power and cutting edge high-tech sectors. The accord also includes cooperation on artificial intelligence and quantum, as related research, according to the presidential office, will be utilized for advancing military technology. President Yoon will visit a war museum which used to host former British leader Winston Churchill's wartime Cabinet, before heading to Paris to promote South Korea's 2030 World Expo bid.

DOCTORS PROTEST QUOTA RISE

[Anchor Lead]
Following the government's announcement of medical school enrollment expansion survey results, tensions have risen with the medical community. The doctors' association, criticizing the survey as a public opinion tactic, met with government officials yesterday. However, the meeting concluded in discord, with both sides reaffirming their differing positions and no resolution achieved.

[Pkg]
The government and a doctors' organization sat down together for the first time since the government revealed the survey results on the expansion of medical student enrollment quota. The doctors' organization harshly criticized the government from the start of the meeting.

[Soundbite]
Yang Dong-ho (Gwangju Medical Association): Is the Korean medical association just a pawn the gov’t is reluctantly negotiating with for its quota push?

They insisted that they have discussed the quota increase with the government since early this year but the government has damaged trust by unilaterally announcing the survey results. The doctors' association explained that the survey that focused on medical schools' needs and demand for enrollment expansion was not scientific nor objective. The health ministry rebutted by explaining that it was just a basic survey to collect opinions on the desired quota increase. The ministry also countered that a medical school admission quota should be increased in order to ease shortage in essential medical services.

[Soundbite]
Chung Kyung-sil (Ministry of Health and Welfare): Doctors should accept the public demand for more doctors and acknowledge the reality that there are hospitals closing down due to a shortage.

The meeting ended in just 20 short minutes, as the doctors' side walked out. Although the discussions broke down, the health ministry plans to finalize a medical enrollment quota for the 2025 academic year by early next year at the latest and notify the education ministry. The medical sector is more fiercely opposing the government's move to speed up the quota increase. Since last week, member doctors of the Gyeonggi-do Medical Association have been closing down their clinics and holding rallies every Wednesday. The Koran Intern Resident Association also pledged not to sit back and watch if the government pushes ahead with the quota increase unilaterally. The Korean Medical Association will hold a nationwide representatives' meeting on Sunday to discuss future response including the possibility of strikes.

COSTS TO MAKE KIMCHI DROP

[Anchor Lead]
According to a survey by the Korea Agro-Fisheries & Food Trade Corporation, an average of about 190,000 won was needed to make kimchi with 20 napa cabbages for kimjang, the annual kimchi-making season, as of November 20. This is some 11.7 percent down from last year's costs. The corporation explained that prices for eleven out of 14 kimchi ingredients dropped due to the government's increased supply and super market chains' discount events.

TOUGHER DRUG CRACKDOWNS

[Anchor Lead]
In a significant move to combat the misuse of narcotics, including drugs like Propofol, the government has announced an intensification of its crackdown. In a bid to prevent the entry of narcotics into the country, authorities have also declared the introduction of advanced detection equipment capable of identifying even small quantities of drugs at all national airports.

[Pkg]
Doctor A, his face hidden under a cap, showed up for a warrant review. He was investigated by the prosecutors for prescribing propofol to actor Yoo Ah-in and self-injecting the leftover propofol.

[Soundbite]
(Doctor A): (Do you admit to illegally administering propofol?) ...

In the wake of several narcotic drug cases involving doctors, the government decided to overhaul the entire system.

[Soundbite]
Bang Ki-sun (Minister of Gov’t Policy Coordination): A screening procedure will be set up to stop drug-addicted medical professionals from prescribing drugs to patients or themselves.

When determined to be addicted to drugs, a doctor's license will be revoked and obtaining another license later will be strictly limited. A doctor will be mandated to check a patient's prescription and drug administration records to prevent patients from 'drug shopping' or visiting different hospitals to get multiple prescriptions for narcotic drugs. The government will also take measures to stop drug smuggling at the source. All the carry-ons belonging to travelers from countries with high drug-related crimes will be inspected and body scanners capable of searching the entire body in three seconds will be set up at airports and seaports.

[Soundbite]
Han Chang-ryeong (Korea Customs Service): We'll focus mostly on Southeast Asian and European countries. Crime-heavy nations will be designated based on information from intel authorities.

The recidivism rate of drug crimes is 36%, about 1.5 times higher than other crimes. The government also plans to expand treatment and rehab facilities by opening drug addiction treatment centers all across the nation by next year. Currently, there are rehab centers only in Seoul, Busan and Daejeon.

G-DRAGON TAKES LEGAL ACTION

[Anchor Lead]
Singer Kwon Ji-yong is pursuing legal action against malicious online postings against him. The lawyer for the singer, who is more widely known as G-Dragon, said that they are taking legal action against those who posted malicious comments about him, including defamation, insults, sexual harassment, spreading false information and malicious slander. Kwon tested negative in all tests so far.

SCHOOL CAFETERIA ROBOTS

[Anchor Lead]
Concerns over health hazards from cooking fumes, particularly when preparing food with hot oil, have long been an issue for cafeteria workers. In a groundbreaking response, a middle school in Seoul has introduced a 'cafeteria robot' to handle these cooking processes.

[Pkg]
Batter-coated chicken is placed on a stand. Then a long robot arm dips the basket in sizzling oil. It is fried and then extra oil is shaken off and the fried chicken is ready to be served. In another corner, fried rice is being cooked. All of this cooking is done by robots. In a first for South Korea, cafeteria robots were introduced at this middle school from second semester.

[Soundbite]
Jo Hyeong-chan (3rd year, Soonggok Middle School): I thought robot-made food wouldn’t be as tasty but the fries had perfect, consistent crunch.

Four robots divide up roles such as in deep frying, stir frying and making stews. A one billion won budget went into their development and operation. The robots usually take on laborious or dangerous tasks such as those involving high temperature. After the introduction, 83% of cafeteria staff at the school said their working conditions have improved, with many positive reviews particularly on fried dishes.

[Soundbite]
Kim Hye-yeong (Nutritionist, Soonggok Middle School): Workers stay away from cooking fumes. Robots are great in manual, repetitive work. So, the cafeteria staff are happy with it.

Education authorities drew a line against concerns that robots will take over human jobs.

[Soundbite]
Cho Hee-yeon (Superintendent, Seoul Metropolitan Office of Education): The robots will first serve at schools facing staff shortage. Such concern is groundless as the deployment can be adjusted.

The Seoul Metropolitan Office of Education plans to secure funding and expand the robot scheme to other schools, mainly for the cooking of deep or stir-fried dishes.

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