기사 본문 영역

상세페이지

Radio Address
입력 2010.07.12 (17:04) News Today
자동재생
동영상영역 시작
동영상영역 끝
[Anchor Lead]

President Lee Myung-bak says he’s determined to create jobs and stabilize people’s livelihoods. He’s also defended the delayed transfer of wartime operational control as a sovereign choice.



[Pkg]

President Lee has described the results of his visits to North and Central America in a radio address. He says many countries are working to create jobs and stabilize their people’s livelihood.



[Soundbite] Lee Myung-bak (President) : “In the second half of this year, the top priority is to create jobs and stabilize the people’s livelihoods.”



The president says Seoul’s hosting of the G20 summit in November is closely related to improving national interests and public life. He forecasts an economic benefit of four-point-two billion U.S. dollars if Korea’s premium rises just one percent.



[Soundbite]

“Such additional economic benefits will help create jobs and improve people’s lives.”



The president also defends the delayed transfer of wartime operational control as a substantial and sovereign decision that will serve national interests.



[Soundbite]

“The government will work to enhance the nation’s war deterrent and get back wartime operational control by December 2015.”



He calls U.S. President Barack Obama’s strong will to ratify the bilateral free trade agreement an unexpected achievement. President Lee also says his summits with Central American countries have produced a bridgehead for Korean companies eyeing the Central American market.



2. Rain Damage



[Anchor Lead]

The southern region of the nation was hit by heavy rain on Sunday. Precipitation of over 200 millimeters submerged houses and farmland.



[Pkg]

A road in a downtown area is flooded after heavy rain hits the area. Cars drive through the flooded street. This old man tried to prevent his house from being flooded, but he has given up when the water rushed all the way into the garden. In a village in Namwon, North Jeolla Province, 20 percent of houses were flooded.



[Soundbite]

“I’m so scared. Our salt was dissolved in water. Now, we have only half a sack of salt.”



The heavy rain have wreaked havoc on vegetables and fruit farmed in green houses. Some 20 green houses were flooded in the region.



[Soundbite]

“We have to throw out the fruit if it’s too soaked.”



Beehives near a stream were also swept away by rising water. The bee farmer is frustrated.



[Soundbite]

“May be we can save bees in the upper floor, but I doubt that bees from the lower floor can survive.”



A flood warning was issued for three regions near the Yeongsan River in South Jeolla Province. And more than 16-hundred hectares of farming land were submerged in the province. With a high wave warning in effect, passenger ships were banned from leaving port in Busan. Flights in Gimhae Airport were canceled due to fog and strong winds.



3. New Corps



[Anchor Lead]

Jeju Island is considered to be the region most affected by global warming in Korea. But the island is trying to take advantage of climate change by creating business opportunities.



[Pkg]

The shores of Seogwipo is famous for beautiful walking paths along the shores. The paths are usually submerged for about four hours a day, but now stay up to eight hours underwater. This is because the sea water level has risen nearly 23 centimeters over the past four decades, or an average of five millimeters a year.



[Soundbite] Hyeon Won-hak (Jeju Eco Education Inst.) : “If the waters continue to rise around Jeju, the famous tourist sites will be submerged and it’ll eventually be invisible.”



Climate change is also affecting plants and animals around Mount Halla. The world’s only natural habitat for Korean fir trees has moved up 300 meters to an altitude of 1-thousand-600 meters. The trees could disappear from the mountain in 100 years at this pace. But this farm that used to grow vegetables is earning more in revenue after switching to the subtropical fruit mango.



[Soundbite] Gang Cheol-jun (Mango Farmer) : “I expect to see 20 ~30% more profits than growing tomatoes.”



Twenty-three other types of subtropical crops are being test grown and will soon be distributed to farms. Jeju has also bred northern bluefin tuna in its waters. The resort island is using global warming as an opportunity to create new revenue sources.



4. Coastal Wetland



[Anchor Lead]

Sand in the Saemangeum Seawall area has been gradually turning into a wetland. Urgent measures are needed to prepare for topographical changes.



[Pkg]

The Korea Ocean Research and Development Institute installed a maritime observation tower last August to monitor the water quality and topographical changes in waters off the Saemangeum Seawall. The tower automatically checks the speed, temperature and salinity of water in real time. After a year of observation, authorities have found that the speed of water in the first 10 kilometers from the seawall is half the speed it used to be before the seawall’s construction.



[Soundbite] Korea Ocean R&D Inst. Official (Voice Modified) : “Now the sand contains mud as well. Someday things will become balanced. But I’m not sure whether it’s still progressing or not.”



Signs of a forming wetland were found in marine creatures as well. Short-necked clams used to be found only in the gravel field of a nearby island, but over the past few years they’ve been found in the wetland as well. Currently, three times as many clams are found here as in the past. Recently, a mudskipper was found on a sand coastland 1.5 kilometers away from the seawall. The mudskipper serves as a telltale sign of a wetland and had never been found in the area before.



[Soundbite] Prof. Choi Yun (Kunsan National University) : “We found mudskippers here. If their population continues to grow each year, it’ll be a sign that the sand is turning into a wetland.”



Measures are needed to prepare for topographical changes in waters off the Saemangeum Seawall.



5. Heart Help



[Anchor Lead]

A Korean adoptee is repaying the kindness he got from the White House in the 1980s. He received free heart surgery and now helps children with heart disease around the world.



[Pkg]

U.S. President Ronald Reagan visited Korea in 1983. He took two Korean children back home. First Lady Nancy Reagan helped the two children get free heart surgery in the U.S. Korean adoptee Brett Halvorson was one of the two children. He is now an international aid worker to help children suffering from heart disease worldwide.



[Soundbite] Brett Halvorson (31, Korean-American)



Halvorson has brought two Salvadoran children with heart disease to Korea for free surgery and medical treatment.



[Soundbite] Catherine (11, El Salvadoran) : “I’m going to go to school and do everything I couldn’t do before. I’ll study and play sports.”



The two children get short of breath so easily, they can hardly walk. But thanks to Halvorson’s help, they’ve gained new life through heart surgery.



[Soundbite] Brett Halvorson (31, Korean-American)



Halvorson was given a second chance in life 27 years ago with a foreigner’s help. He is now repaying that kindness by helping needy children around the world.



6. Dog Retirement



[Anchor Lead]

Dogs play a major role in detecting hidden drugs. One of Korea’s best drug detecting dogs has retired with honor.



[Pkg]

Drug detecting dog Neo roams amid mail. This is his last day at work which he had been doing for the past eight years. Neo breathes hard but never stops working. The mail is classified only after Neo’s inspection. Neo is as old as humans in their 60s but is his skills have not rusted yet. Neo detects drug in no time after roaming through mannequins and luggage. Neo’s sense of smell is more than 100 times stronger than that of humans.



[Soundbite] Choi Dong-gwon (Detector Dogs Training Center) : “Neo is a very rare fellow. You can find it probably only once every ten years.”



Over the past eight years, Neo has detected a total of 68 cases of drug smuggling and has been approved as Korea’s best drug detecting dog. He had played a major role in finding smuggled drug worth around 167,000 dollars in April.



[Soundbite] Jin Seong-chae (Neo’s Managing Agent) : “I’m really sad to send him away, but now he needs to relax a little bit.”



Neo has finished his term as a drug detection dog successfully. It’s handed over his position to his son Gyeore.



7. Busan Tour



[Anchor Lead]

A Latin American family has been traveling around the world for ten years. The Zapps are from Argentina and have arrived in Korea’s largest port city of Busan.



[Pkg]

An old car appears in downtown Busan. An Argentine couple and their four children are onboard. The family has been touring the world for ten years. They arrived in Busan on the first leg of their two-year visit to Asia. The Zapps visit museums to learn about the history and culture of Korea’s largest port city.



[Soundbite] Herman Zapp (Argentinean)



Herman Zapp takes his wife Candelaria and his four children on a bus tour of Busan. They also relax on the beach. The Argentine family has visited hundreds of world cities over the past ten years. They soon find the unique appeal of Busan. The Zapps’ biggest challenge is their children’s education, but manage through traveling and cyber education.



[Soundbite] Candelaria Zapp (Argentinean)



They publish and sell travelogues to fund their trips. They will tour Korea and other Asian nations over the next two years. The Zapps’ journey is an exploration of the passion, freedom and dream of life.



8. Brand Melons



[Anchor Lead]

Watermelons costing ten times more than ordinary ones are drawing attention. Let’s see how watermelons with a price tag of over 140 U.S. dollars are grown.



[Pkg]

This is a watermelon judging contest held at a department store in Busan. Korea’s most expensive watermelon has been selected out of 36,000 watermelons. This watermelon grown in Gochang, North Jeolla Province was sold at around 142 dollars, a price about 10 times higher than normal watermelons.



[Soundbite] Jeong Byeong-cheol (Watermelon Farmer) : “I’ve grown watermelons for nearly 30 years, but this is the first time that such a thing happened to me.”



The best watermelon is ripe, has clear stripes and very thin skin. The fruit offers a delicate taste and a mildly crispy texture. While an average watermelon’s sweetness is around 10 degree Brix, its sweetness is over 13 degree Brix, It’s because the fruit is planted in yellow mud soil that is strong against pests, and the sea breeze.



[Soundbite] Sin Geon-seung (Gochang Watermelon R&D Center) : “Leaving produce exposed to the minerals in the sea winds is a commonly used method. You dont’ need to do much about it.”



Installing waterways and ventilation systems to supply nutrition to the soil and maintain the appropriate humidity also played a major role.



[Soundbite] Song Jin-ui (Gochang Agricultural Technology Center) : “Soils were maintained in nutritious conditions and a large amount of hay was added to keep the air in the best condition for the fruit.”



Farmers say hard work and special care are the key to good quality produce.



9. Summer Sun



[Anchor Lead]

People head to the mountains or the sea to beat the summer heat. But there are also places in the city where you can spend the summer as if it were winter. Today, we’ll take you to an ice sculpture gallery, an indoor ski resort, and an ice climbing wall.



[Pkg]

In the peak of summer, it’s freezing in here. This is an ice-themed exhibition. The temperature is minus five degrees Celsius, so guests need to bundle up. The spectacle consists of ice pieces twinkling under colorful lights. People looking to cool down can reach out and touch the frozen works. The ice slide is the most popular among children.



[Soundbite]

“It’s been so hot lately, but it’s so cool here and I had a lot of fun. I feel great.”



Famous landmarks are also sculpted of ice. Works include the Dabo Pagoda at Bulguk Temple and Korea’s National Treasure No. 1, the Sungnyemun gate, which is currently being restored after being destroyed by arson. Visitors can try making ice cups and bowls. They drink juice and eat fruit from the cups they made and scoop up watermelon with an ice spoon.



[Soundbite]

“It’s so cool and delicious.”



[Soundbite]

“It’s very good.”



[Soundbite]

“It’s so fun. I want to come back again.”



This is an indoor ski slope. Here, skiers and boarders don’t need to wait for winter.



[Soundbite]

“It’s cool here and really great to see snow in the summer.”



[Soundbite]

“The snow experience beats the heat away.”



This is the only place in the country where you can ski and snowboard in the summer. Many professionals come here to train in the off season.



[Soundbite] Lee Mi-yeong (Skiboard Athlete) : “I come here often when training abroad is difficult financially and time-wise.”



There’s a huge ice wall at this sports center in Seoul. You can go ice climbing here, which is a rare experience for many, even in winter.



[Soundbite]

“You have fun and also get to work out in the cool place.”



[Soundbite]

“It’s thrilling to enjoy winter sports in summer. Ice climbing is really exhilarating.”



The same equipment for outdoor mountain climbing is used. Safety precautions are a must on the ice wall. The climbing looks tough, but if you’re equipped with the right gear and properly trained, there’s no need to worry about safety. Some people are going against the grain by making the most of winter in the middle of summer.
  • Radio Address
    • 입력 2010-07-12 17:04:38
    News Today
[Anchor Lead]

President Lee Myung-bak says he’s determined to create jobs and stabilize people’s livelihoods. He’s also defended the delayed transfer of wartime operational control as a sovereign choice.



[Pkg]

President Lee has described the results of his visits to North and Central America in a radio address. He says many countries are working to create jobs and stabilize their people’s livelihood.



[Soundbite] Lee Myung-bak (President) : “In the second half of this year, the top priority is to create jobs and stabilize the people’s livelihoods.”



The president says Seoul’s hosting of the G20 summit in November is closely related to improving national interests and public life. He forecasts an economic benefit of four-point-two billion U.S. dollars if Korea’s premium rises just one percent.



[Soundbite]

“Such additional economic benefits will help create jobs and improve people’s lives.”



The president also defends the delayed transfer of wartime operational control as a substantial and sovereign decision that will serve national interests.



[Soundbite]

“The government will work to enhance the nation’s war deterrent and get back wartime operational control by December 2015.”



He calls U.S. President Barack Obama’s strong will to ratify the bilateral free trade agreement an unexpected achievement. President Lee also says his summits with Central American countries have produced a bridgehead for Korean companies eyeing the Central American market.



2. Rain Damage



[Anchor Lead]

The southern region of the nation was hit by heavy rain on Sunday. Precipitation of over 200 millimeters submerged houses and farmland.



[Pkg]

A road in a downtown area is flooded after heavy rain hits the area. Cars drive through the flooded street. This old man tried to prevent his house from being flooded, but he has given up when the water rushed all the way into the garden. In a village in Namwon, North Jeolla Province, 20 percent of houses were flooded.



[Soundbite]

“I’m so scared. Our salt was dissolved in water. Now, we have only half a sack of salt.”



The heavy rain have wreaked havoc on vegetables and fruit farmed in green houses. Some 20 green houses were flooded in the region.



[Soundbite]

“We have to throw out the fruit if it’s too soaked.”



Beehives near a stream were also swept away by rising water. The bee farmer is frustrated.



[Soundbite]

“May be we can save bees in the upper floor, but I doubt that bees from the lower floor can survive.”



A flood warning was issued for three regions near the Yeongsan River in South Jeolla Province. And more than 16-hundred hectares of farming land were submerged in the province. With a high wave warning in effect, passenger ships were banned from leaving port in Busan. Flights in Gimhae Airport were canceled due to fog and strong winds.



3. New Corps



[Anchor Lead]

Jeju Island is considered to be the region most affected by global warming in Korea. But the island is trying to take advantage of climate change by creating business opportunities.



[Pkg]

The shores of Seogwipo is famous for beautiful walking paths along the shores. The paths are usually submerged for about four hours a day, but now stay up to eight hours underwater. This is because the sea water level has risen nearly 23 centimeters over the past four decades, or an average of five millimeters a year.



[Soundbite] Hyeon Won-hak (Jeju Eco Education Inst.) : “If the waters continue to rise around Jeju, the famous tourist sites will be submerged and it’ll eventually be invisible.”



Climate change is also affecting plants and animals around Mount Halla. The world’s only natural habitat for Korean fir trees has moved up 300 meters to an altitude of 1-thousand-600 meters. The trees could disappear from the mountain in 100 years at this pace. But this farm that used to grow vegetables is earning more in revenue after switching to the subtropical fruit mango.



[Soundbite] Gang Cheol-jun (Mango Farmer) : “I expect to see 20 ~30% more profits than growing tomatoes.”



Twenty-three other types of subtropical crops are being test grown and will soon be distributed to farms. Jeju has also bred northern bluefin tuna in its waters. The resort island is using global warming as an opportunity to create new revenue sources.



4. Coastal Wetland



[Anchor Lead]

Sand in the Saemangeum Seawall area has been gradually turning into a wetland. Urgent measures are needed to prepare for topographical changes.



[Pkg]

The Korea Ocean Research and Development Institute installed a maritime observation tower last August to monitor the water quality and topographical changes in waters off the Saemangeum Seawall. The tower automatically checks the speed, temperature and salinity of water in real time. After a year of observation, authorities have found that the speed of water in the first 10 kilometers from the seawall is half the speed it used to be before the seawall’s construction.



[Soundbite] Korea Ocean R&D Inst. Official (Voice Modified) : “Now the sand contains mud as well. Someday things will become balanced. But I’m not sure whether it’s still progressing or not.”



Signs of a forming wetland were found in marine creatures as well. Short-necked clams used to be found only in the gravel field of a nearby island, but over the past few years they’ve been found in the wetland as well. Currently, three times as many clams are found here as in the past. Recently, a mudskipper was found on a sand coastland 1.5 kilometers away from the seawall. The mudskipper serves as a telltale sign of a wetland and had never been found in the area before.



[Soundbite] Prof. Choi Yun (Kunsan National University) : “We found mudskippers here. If their population continues to grow each year, it’ll be a sign that the sand is turning into a wetland.”



Measures are needed to prepare for topographical changes in waters off the Saemangeum Seawall.



5. Heart Help



[Anchor Lead]

A Korean adoptee is repaying the kindness he got from the White House in the 1980s. He received free heart surgery and now helps children with heart disease around the world.



[Pkg]

U.S. President Ronald Reagan visited Korea in 1983. He took two Korean children back home. First Lady Nancy Reagan helped the two children get free heart surgery in the U.S. Korean adoptee Brett Halvorson was one of the two children. He is now an international aid worker to help children suffering from heart disease worldwide.



[Soundbite] Brett Halvorson (31, Korean-American)



Halvorson has brought two Salvadoran children with heart disease to Korea for free surgery and medical treatment.



[Soundbite] Catherine (11, El Salvadoran) : “I’m going to go to school and do everything I couldn’t do before. I’ll study and play sports.”



The two children get short of breath so easily, they can hardly walk. But thanks to Halvorson’s help, they’ve gained new life through heart surgery.



[Soundbite] Brett Halvorson (31, Korean-American)



Halvorson was given a second chance in life 27 years ago with a foreigner’s help. He is now repaying that kindness by helping needy children around the world.



6. Dog Retirement



[Anchor Lead]

Dogs play a major role in detecting hidden drugs. One of Korea’s best drug detecting dogs has retired with honor.



[Pkg]

Drug detecting dog Neo roams amid mail. This is his last day at work which he had been doing for the past eight years. Neo breathes hard but never stops working. The mail is classified only after Neo’s inspection. Neo is as old as humans in their 60s but is his skills have not rusted yet. Neo detects drug in no time after roaming through mannequins and luggage. Neo’s sense of smell is more than 100 times stronger than that of humans.



[Soundbite] Choi Dong-gwon (Detector Dogs Training Center) : “Neo is a very rare fellow. You can find it probably only once every ten years.”



Over the past eight years, Neo has detected a total of 68 cases of drug smuggling and has been approved as Korea’s best drug detecting dog. He had played a major role in finding smuggled drug worth around 167,000 dollars in April.



[Soundbite] Jin Seong-chae (Neo’s Managing Agent) : “I’m really sad to send him away, but now he needs to relax a little bit.”



Neo has finished his term as a drug detection dog successfully. It’s handed over his position to his son Gyeore.



7. Busan Tour



[Anchor Lead]

A Latin American family has been traveling around the world for ten years. The Zapps are from Argentina and have arrived in Korea’s largest port city of Busan.



[Pkg]

An old car appears in downtown Busan. An Argentine couple and their four children are onboard. The family has been touring the world for ten years. They arrived in Busan on the first leg of their two-year visit to Asia. The Zapps visit museums to learn about the history and culture of Korea’s largest port city.



[Soundbite] Herman Zapp (Argentinean)



Herman Zapp takes his wife Candelaria and his four children on a bus tour of Busan. They also relax on the beach. The Argentine family has visited hundreds of world cities over the past ten years. They soon find the unique appeal of Busan. The Zapps’ biggest challenge is their children’s education, but manage through traveling and cyber education.



[Soundbite] Candelaria Zapp (Argentinean)



They publish and sell travelogues to fund their trips. They will tour Korea and other Asian nations over the next two years. The Zapps’ journey is an exploration of the passion, freedom and dream of life.



8. Brand Melons



[Anchor Lead]

Watermelons costing ten times more than ordinary ones are drawing attention. Let’s see how watermelons with a price tag of over 140 U.S. dollars are grown.



[Pkg]

This is a watermelon judging contest held at a department store in Busan. Korea’s most expensive watermelon has been selected out of 36,000 watermelons. This watermelon grown in Gochang, North Jeolla Province was sold at around 142 dollars, a price about 10 times higher than normal watermelons.



[Soundbite] Jeong Byeong-cheol (Watermelon Farmer) : “I’ve grown watermelons for nearly 30 years, but this is the first time that such a thing happened to me.”



The best watermelon is ripe, has clear stripes and very thin skin. The fruit offers a delicate taste and a mildly crispy texture. While an average watermelon’s sweetness is around 10 degree Brix, its sweetness is over 13 degree Brix, It’s because the fruit is planted in yellow mud soil that is strong against pests, and the sea breeze.



[Soundbite] Sin Geon-seung (Gochang Watermelon R&D Center) : “Leaving produce exposed to the minerals in the sea winds is a commonly used method. You dont’ need to do much about it.”



Installing waterways and ventilation systems to supply nutrition to the soil and maintain the appropriate humidity also played a major role.



[Soundbite] Song Jin-ui (Gochang Agricultural Technology Center) : “Soils were maintained in nutritious conditions and a large amount of hay was added to keep the air in the best condition for the fruit.”



Farmers say hard work and special care are the key to good quality produce.



9. Summer Sun



[Anchor Lead]

People head to the mountains or the sea to beat the summer heat. But there are also places in the city where you can spend the summer as if it were winter. Today, we’ll take you to an ice sculpture gallery, an indoor ski resort, and an ice climbing wall.



[Pkg]

In the peak of summer, it’s freezing in here. This is an ice-themed exhibition. The temperature is minus five degrees Celsius, so guests need to bundle up. The spectacle consists of ice pieces twinkling under colorful lights. People looking to cool down can reach out and touch the frozen works. The ice slide is the most popular among children.



[Soundbite]

“It’s been so hot lately, but it’s so cool here and I had a lot of fun. I feel great.”



Famous landmarks are also sculpted of ice. Works include the Dabo Pagoda at Bulguk Temple and Korea’s National Treasure No. 1, the Sungnyemun gate, which is currently being restored after being destroyed by arson. Visitors can try making ice cups and bowls. They drink juice and eat fruit from the cups they made and scoop up watermelon with an ice spoon.



[Soundbite]

“It’s so cool and delicious.”



[Soundbite]

“It’s very good.”



[Soundbite]

“It’s so fun. I want to come back again.”



This is an indoor ski slope. Here, skiers and boarders don’t need to wait for winter.



[Soundbite]

“It’s cool here and really great to see snow in the summer.”



[Soundbite]

“The snow experience beats the heat away.”



This is the only place in the country where you can ski and snowboard in the summer. Many professionals come here to train in the off season.



[Soundbite] Lee Mi-yeong (Skiboard Athlete) : “I come here often when training abroad is difficult financially and time-wise.”



There’s a huge ice wall at this sports center in Seoul. You can go ice climbing here, which is a rare experience for many, even in winter.



[Soundbite]

“You have fun and also get to work out in the cool place.”



[Soundbite]

“It’s thrilling to enjoy winter sports in summer. Ice climbing is really exhilarating.”



The same equipment for outdoor mountain climbing is used. Safety precautions are a must on the ice wall. The climbing looks tough, but if you’re equipped with the right gear and properly trained, there’s no need to worry about safety. Some people are going against the grain by making the most of winter in the middle of summer.
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