기사 본문 영역

상세페이지

Drill Finishes
입력 2010.07.28 (17:19) News Today
자동재생
동영상영역 시작
동영상영역 끝
[Anchor Lead]

South Korean and U.S. forces have ended a four-day joint military drill. They’ve held live ammunition drills for intensified attacks on submarines using.



[Pkg]

South Korean and U.S. forces conduct an exercise for attacking submarines as if in a real battle. Lynx helicopters track down and attack submarines. The cutting-edge Korean torpedo named Blue Shark is fired to destroy the enemy. Training for attacks by naval guns and jet fighters are conducted along with base exercises for protection against an enemy invasion.



[Soundbite] Rear Adm. Lower Half Son Cha-su (Head, Military Exercise) : “Our soldiers are training to intensify skills and capabilities in joint operations and battles.”



The two allies practiced drills on avoiding attacks from underwater, at sea and from the air on their joint drill’s final day Wednesday. Naval and air forces received training on attacking and defending against multiple threats. Attack and defend drills were conducted, as well as those for refueling at sea and transporting supplies. Key South Korean and U.S. fighters also continued drills in air-to-land attacks Tuesday. The four-day exercise was called "Invincible Spirit" and constituted the largest military drill held in the East Sea.



2. Armistice Day



[Anchor Lead]

Korea marked the 57th anniversary of the ceasefire of the Korean War yesterday. Civic groups organized various events to mark the occasion.



[Pkg]

Balloons containing a hundred thousand leaflets criticizing North Korea for the Korean War and sinking of the Navy corvette Cheonan fly into the sky. This event was organized by three civic groups, including a community of North Korean defectors.



[Soundbite] Park Sang-hak (Fighters for Free North Korea) : “North Korea celebrates their victory every July 27th. We want them to know the truth about the war.”



Korean War veterans and the bereaved families of perished soldiers prayed for peace and national reunification near the inter-Korean border. They also walked along the 250-kilometer truce line, which still bears the painful scars of war. The U.N. Forces Command, which participated in the signing of the Korean War armistice, also organized an event.



[Soundbite] General Walter Sharp (Commander, U.N. Command)



However, the Korean government didn’t hold any special events to mark the anniversary of the cease-fire. It only marked the 60th anniversary of the breakout of the Korean War.



3. WiFi Network



[Anchor Lead]

The rapid spread of smartphones has raised competition in the wireless Internet market. Service providers are vying for the lead in the domestic market by attracting customers with new marketing strategies.



[Pkg]

Two and a half million people use smartphones in Korea. That figure keeps growing and has increased the use of wireless Internet. But the number of free Wi-Fi areas is limited.



[Soundbite]

“There are limited Wi-Fi zones. I have to look for them and it’s such a hassle.”



KT will resolve this inconvenience by raising the number of Wi-Fi spots to 100-thousand by the end of next year. Large expansion of the wireless broadband network, or WiBro, will come next. After this is completed, Net users can go online in major cities and on expressways across the country. Investment in the project has reached 4.3 billion U.S. dollars.



[Soundbite] Pyo Hyun-myung (CEO, KT Corp.) : “A total revolution of both fixed and wireless networks is necessary.”



KT’s move follows that of rival SK Telecom, which has allowed unlimited use of Wi-Fi on the existing 3G network. The surging competition is hoped to ease the use of Wi-Fi and make it more affordable.



4. Jeju Geopark



[Anchor Lead]

Jeju Island, already a Unesco natural heritage site, is now seeking a Unesco global geological park designation. On-field inspection for park status approval is now underway.



[Pkg]

Officials from the UNESCO Global Network of National Geoparks have visited the lava cave Manjang in Jeju. The group of experts showed interest in the cave’s intact preservation and geological value. They also toured the Jeju Stone Park where 10,000 Jeju stones are displayed. They noted the fact that geological relics combined with local mythologies were made into an educational site.



[Soundbite]

Global Network of National Geoparks Official



A world geological park is a site with high value in terms of earth science and where education and tourism join hands to contribute to the local economy. 64 sites of 19 countries have so far been registered on the UNESCO geopark list.



[Soundbite] Lee Su-jae (Korea Environment Institute) : “They focus on the use and preservation of geological assets, their contribution to the economy and local education on the natural properties.”



Jeju has applied for the designation on nine candidate sites including Mount Halla and the Seongsan Sunrise Peak. The final decision will come by the year-end.



5. Chinese Visas



[Anchor Lead]

Chinese tourists will find it easier to enter Korea starting next month. The easing of visa regulations is expected to significantly raise the number of visitors from China.



[Pkg]

Around 1.3 million Chinese visited Korea last year. This was second only to the number of Japanese tourists. But Chinese must undergo a stricter immigration process, needing to show employment or business certification and identification. So sweeping changes in visa policy will simplify things to attract more Chinese to Korea. Chinese eligible for a multi-entry visa to Korea include university professors or the wealthy. This will be expanded Sunday to include those with professional licenses, staff from China’s top 500 companies, and graduates of leading Chinese universities. The multi-entry visa allows unlimited visits to Korea over three years. The eligibility of families will also be expanded to attract more family tourists. The double-entry visa has also been introduced.



[Soundbite] Seok Dong-hyeon (Ministry of Justice) : “This is to achieve the government’s goal to attract more than three million Chinese tourists a year by 2012.”



Korea is competing with Japan to attract Chinese tourists. Japan loosened entry-visa rules for Chinese July 1st.



6. Green Points



[Anchor Lead]

In an effort to reduce trash at national parks, people who pick up litter will receive reward points. The points can redeemed at park facilities.



[Pkg]

The Mount Bukhan National Park is crowded with people in the summer vacation season. Park staff give out plastic bags at the entrance.



[Soundbite]

“If you pick up your garbage from the mountain, you get points according to the weight.”



Each bag filled with garbage will be weighed and documented when climbers bring them down when leaving the park. This is called the national park green point system. People can pick up others’ trash as well and will be given points according to the weight. One point is equivalent to four grams of regular trash and ten grams for recycled articles such as bottles.



[Soundbite]

“It’s great to get points for picking up trash. I’ll do it again next time.”



[Soundbite]

“We receive points just for picking up trash.”



The cumulated points can be used as cash at parking lots, camp site or lodges.



[Soundbite] Lee Seong-gwan (Korea National Park Service) : “For 500 points, you get a coupon for free use of the campsite and parking lot. For 700 points, you can use lodges for free.”



The Korea National Park Service expects the point system to cut 15-hundred tons of garbage per year.



7. Play Reborn



[Anchor Lead]

The Korean play "Ogu" will return to the stage for the first time in six years. The term "ogu" refers to a shamanistic ritual for the living. Ogu had been performed in small theaters over the past 22 years, but will make its debut on the big stage.



[Pkg]

The angel of death comes for an 80-year-old lady who’s taking a nap. She refuses to go with all of her body. The lady wakes up and senses her days are numbered. She asks her son to perform an exorcism ritual for the living. The performance reaches the climax as the lady shuts her eyes and the supplicatory event turns into a funeral. This play premiered in 1989 and has since been staged 12-hundred times in front of a combined 350-thousand people. Ogu will return to the stage in Seoul after a six-year hiatus. Actress Kang Bu-ja will play the heroine for the 13th year.



[Soundbite] Gang Bu-ja (Actress, "Ogu") : “Playing this role is like living a new life. I feel like my body has been purified.”



The ritual represents life and the funeral death. But both are depicted in a familiar way not much different from normal life. The play also sends the message of communication between life and death.



[Soundbite] Lee Yun-taek (Director, "Ogu") : “Korean culture deals with both life and death. It’s a highly spiritual and sophisticated culture.”



How the play will connect with the audience after a six-year absence is attracting attention.



8. Watermelon Fest



[Anchor Lead]

Watermelons are among the most popular summer fruits. Here’s a look at an exhibition showcasing the world’s most rare kinds.



[Pkg]

There are many different unique watermelons including football-shaped ones and those as small as a baseball. The skilled hands of the sculptor unveil the insides of the golden watermelon. There’s also a yellow watermelon that seems as if it had been colored artificially. Watermelons of various colors, shapes and flavor draw the eyes of visitors.



[Soundbite]

“It’s interesting to see rare melons you can’t see in Korea. They taste different from Korean watermelons as well.”



Indigenous watermelons grown with seeds from some 30 countries worldwide including Africa and Russia are being exhibited. There are over 90 different kinds on display including the yellow, black and white melons.



[Soundbite]

“The yellow one didn’t look good, but it’s very sweet and delicious.”



Watermelons which are composed more than 90 percent of water, helps with urination. It also has anti-oxidant properties which are good for anti-aging and cancer prevention.



[Soundbite] No Jae-jong (N. Jeolla Agricultural Research & Extension Services) : “We’re gathering such resources to develop watermelons that are good to eat for consumers and easy to grow for farms.”



Healthy and nutritious watermelons make perfect summer snacks.



9. Teen Efforts



[Anchor Lead]

Despite the sweltering weather, some teenagers are working hard to realize their dreams. Some devote themselves to singing and dancing with a goal of becoming singers. And some are pushing themselves to become traditional vocalists in the Korean musical storytelling genre of "pansori." Let’s meet these passionate teens.



[Pkg]

These adolescents sing, dance and rap. They are making a demo reel for auditions.



[Soundbite] Eum Chae-ri (16, Prospective Singer) : “I think I’m still not good enough. I need to work harder.”



Oh Byeong-hyeon used to be a baseball player. But he belatedly realized that he wants to become a singer. He’s doing his best, but sometimes feels uncertain about his future.



[Soundbite] O Byeong-Hyeon (18, Prospective Singer) : “I often wonder if this is my limit. I’m not really sure about my future. I’m discouraged when he scolds me.”



He shares his worries with other hopefuls. They understand each other since they’re in the same boat.



[Soundbite] Cheon Su-jin (19, Prospective Singer ) : “My peers are preparing for the college entrance exam. Sometimes, I’m not sure about my choice. I’m not getting better and chances never come.”



When they get discouraged, they go see a concert to strengthen their determination. Sometimes, they are able to receive advice directly from popular singers.



[Soundbite]

“How do you get out of a slump?”



[Soundbite] Sung-min (Super Junior Member) : “You should always stay grounded. Think again about why you decided to become a singer.”



The advice helps them soldier on. Voices resound by Mt. Jiri. Girls are practicing pansori by a waterfall.



[Soundbite] Kim Hui-jin (Pansori Apprentice) : “I came her to learn pansori for 20 days during the summer vacation.”



A valley is a perfect place for a pansori class. The teacher gives an example and the pupils follow suit during the class. Then, the students practice individually by the falls.



[Soundbite] Lee Bo-yeon (Pansori Apprentice) : “I practice listening to my own voice that the teacher recorded during the class.”



They are working hard with a concert scheduled. But in the water, their playfulness shows that they are still just teenage girls. They keep practicing at their residence. The girls are told off when they fail to meet the teacher’s expectations.



[Soundbite] Nam Hye-seong (Pansori Master) : “I feel sorry that they’re apart from their parents and going through hard times. But I need to be tough, if necessary. I often pamper them, too.”



[Soundbite] Lee Myeong-hak (Pansori Apprentice) : “Sometimes, my eyes are filled with tears. I feel like crying, but the teacher disciplines me because he wants me to do better.”



Their families and friends have tried to persuade them to give up on their dreams, telling them they can’t make a good living from being a pansori singer. But the girls still cling to their passion for pansori.



[Soundbite] An Jin-yeong (Pansori Apprentice) : “I want to become a pansory master with various talents and skills.”



These teenagers are doing best to make their dreams come true. They hope that they will be able to reap the benefits of their efforts in the future.
  • Drill Finishes
    • 입력 2010-07-28 17:19:18
    News Today
[Anchor Lead]

South Korean and U.S. forces have ended a four-day joint military drill. They’ve held live ammunition drills for intensified attacks on submarines using.



[Pkg]

South Korean and U.S. forces conduct an exercise for attacking submarines as if in a real battle. Lynx helicopters track down and attack submarines. The cutting-edge Korean torpedo named Blue Shark is fired to destroy the enemy. Training for attacks by naval guns and jet fighters are conducted along with base exercises for protection against an enemy invasion.



[Soundbite] Rear Adm. Lower Half Son Cha-su (Head, Military Exercise) : “Our soldiers are training to intensify skills and capabilities in joint operations and battles.”



The two allies practiced drills on avoiding attacks from underwater, at sea and from the air on their joint drill’s final day Wednesday. Naval and air forces received training on attacking and defending against multiple threats. Attack and defend drills were conducted, as well as those for refueling at sea and transporting supplies. Key South Korean and U.S. fighters also continued drills in air-to-land attacks Tuesday. The four-day exercise was called "Invincible Spirit" and constituted the largest military drill held in the East Sea.



2. Armistice Day



[Anchor Lead]

Korea marked the 57th anniversary of the ceasefire of the Korean War yesterday. Civic groups organized various events to mark the occasion.



[Pkg]

Balloons containing a hundred thousand leaflets criticizing North Korea for the Korean War and sinking of the Navy corvette Cheonan fly into the sky. This event was organized by three civic groups, including a community of North Korean defectors.



[Soundbite] Park Sang-hak (Fighters for Free North Korea) : “North Korea celebrates their victory every July 27th. We want them to know the truth about the war.”



Korean War veterans and the bereaved families of perished soldiers prayed for peace and national reunification near the inter-Korean border. They also walked along the 250-kilometer truce line, which still bears the painful scars of war. The U.N. Forces Command, which participated in the signing of the Korean War armistice, also organized an event.



[Soundbite] General Walter Sharp (Commander, U.N. Command)



However, the Korean government didn’t hold any special events to mark the anniversary of the cease-fire. It only marked the 60th anniversary of the breakout of the Korean War.



3. WiFi Network



[Anchor Lead]

The rapid spread of smartphones has raised competition in the wireless Internet market. Service providers are vying for the lead in the domestic market by attracting customers with new marketing strategies.



[Pkg]

Two and a half million people use smartphones in Korea. That figure keeps growing and has increased the use of wireless Internet. But the number of free Wi-Fi areas is limited.



[Soundbite]

“There are limited Wi-Fi zones. I have to look for them and it’s such a hassle.”



KT will resolve this inconvenience by raising the number of Wi-Fi spots to 100-thousand by the end of next year. Large expansion of the wireless broadband network, or WiBro, will come next. After this is completed, Net users can go online in major cities and on expressways across the country. Investment in the project has reached 4.3 billion U.S. dollars.



[Soundbite] Pyo Hyun-myung (CEO, KT Corp.) : “A total revolution of both fixed and wireless networks is necessary.”



KT’s move follows that of rival SK Telecom, which has allowed unlimited use of Wi-Fi on the existing 3G network. The surging competition is hoped to ease the use of Wi-Fi and make it more affordable.



4. Jeju Geopark



[Anchor Lead]

Jeju Island, already a Unesco natural heritage site, is now seeking a Unesco global geological park designation. On-field inspection for park status approval is now underway.



[Pkg]

Officials from the UNESCO Global Network of National Geoparks have visited the lava cave Manjang in Jeju. The group of experts showed interest in the cave’s intact preservation and geological value. They also toured the Jeju Stone Park where 10,000 Jeju stones are displayed. They noted the fact that geological relics combined with local mythologies were made into an educational site.



[Soundbite]

Global Network of National Geoparks Official



A world geological park is a site with high value in terms of earth science and where education and tourism join hands to contribute to the local economy. 64 sites of 19 countries have so far been registered on the UNESCO geopark list.



[Soundbite] Lee Su-jae (Korea Environment Institute) : “They focus on the use and preservation of geological assets, their contribution to the economy and local education on the natural properties.”



Jeju has applied for the designation on nine candidate sites including Mount Halla and the Seongsan Sunrise Peak. The final decision will come by the year-end.



5. Chinese Visas



[Anchor Lead]

Chinese tourists will find it easier to enter Korea starting next month. The easing of visa regulations is expected to significantly raise the number of visitors from China.



[Pkg]

Around 1.3 million Chinese visited Korea last year. This was second only to the number of Japanese tourists. But Chinese must undergo a stricter immigration process, needing to show employment or business certification and identification. So sweeping changes in visa policy will simplify things to attract more Chinese to Korea. Chinese eligible for a multi-entry visa to Korea include university professors or the wealthy. This will be expanded Sunday to include those with professional licenses, staff from China’s top 500 companies, and graduates of leading Chinese universities. The multi-entry visa allows unlimited visits to Korea over three years. The eligibility of families will also be expanded to attract more family tourists. The double-entry visa has also been introduced.



[Soundbite] Seok Dong-hyeon (Ministry of Justice) : “This is to achieve the government’s goal to attract more than three million Chinese tourists a year by 2012.”



Korea is competing with Japan to attract Chinese tourists. Japan loosened entry-visa rules for Chinese July 1st.



6. Green Points



[Anchor Lead]

In an effort to reduce trash at national parks, people who pick up litter will receive reward points. The points can redeemed at park facilities.



[Pkg]

The Mount Bukhan National Park is crowded with people in the summer vacation season. Park staff give out plastic bags at the entrance.



[Soundbite]

“If you pick up your garbage from the mountain, you get points according to the weight.”



Each bag filled with garbage will be weighed and documented when climbers bring them down when leaving the park. This is called the national park green point system. People can pick up others’ trash as well and will be given points according to the weight. One point is equivalent to four grams of regular trash and ten grams for recycled articles such as bottles.



[Soundbite]

“It’s great to get points for picking up trash. I’ll do it again next time.”



[Soundbite]

“We receive points just for picking up trash.”



The cumulated points can be used as cash at parking lots, camp site or lodges.



[Soundbite] Lee Seong-gwan (Korea National Park Service) : “For 500 points, you get a coupon for free use of the campsite and parking lot. For 700 points, you can use lodges for free.”



The Korea National Park Service expects the point system to cut 15-hundred tons of garbage per year.



7. Play Reborn



[Anchor Lead]

The Korean play "Ogu" will return to the stage for the first time in six years. The term "ogu" refers to a shamanistic ritual for the living. Ogu had been performed in small theaters over the past 22 years, but will make its debut on the big stage.



[Pkg]

The angel of death comes for an 80-year-old lady who’s taking a nap. She refuses to go with all of her body. The lady wakes up and senses her days are numbered. She asks her son to perform an exorcism ritual for the living. The performance reaches the climax as the lady shuts her eyes and the supplicatory event turns into a funeral. This play premiered in 1989 and has since been staged 12-hundred times in front of a combined 350-thousand people. Ogu will return to the stage in Seoul after a six-year hiatus. Actress Kang Bu-ja will play the heroine for the 13th year.



[Soundbite] Gang Bu-ja (Actress, "Ogu") : “Playing this role is like living a new life. I feel like my body has been purified.”



The ritual represents life and the funeral death. But both are depicted in a familiar way not much different from normal life. The play also sends the message of communication between life and death.



[Soundbite] Lee Yun-taek (Director, "Ogu") : “Korean culture deals with both life and death. It’s a highly spiritual and sophisticated culture.”



How the play will connect with the audience after a six-year absence is attracting attention.



8. Watermelon Fest



[Anchor Lead]

Watermelons are among the most popular summer fruits. Here’s a look at an exhibition showcasing the world’s most rare kinds.



[Pkg]

There are many different unique watermelons including football-shaped ones and those as small as a baseball. The skilled hands of the sculptor unveil the insides of the golden watermelon. There’s also a yellow watermelon that seems as if it had been colored artificially. Watermelons of various colors, shapes and flavor draw the eyes of visitors.



[Soundbite]

“It’s interesting to see rare melons you can’t see in Korea. They taste different from Korean watermelons as well.”



Indigenous watermelons grown with seeds from some 30 countries worldwide including Africa and Russia are being exhibited. There are over 90 different kinds on display including the yellow, black and white melons.



[Soundbite]

“The yellow one didn’t look good, but it’s very sweet and delicious.”



Watermelons which are composed more than 90 percent of water, helps with urination. It also has anti-oxidant properties which are good for anti-aging and cancer prevention.



[Soundbite] No Jae-jong (N. Jeolla Agricultural Research & Extension Services) : “We’re gathering such resources to develop watermelons that are good to eat for consumers and easy to grow for farms.”



Healthy and nutritious watermelons make perfect summer snacks.



9. Teen Efforts



[Anchor Lead]

Despite the sweltering weather, some teenagers are working hard to realize their dreams. Some devote themselves to singing and dancing with a goal of becoming singers. And some are pushing themselves to become traditional vocalists in the Korean musical storytelling genre of "pansori." Let’s meet these passionate teens.



[Pkg]

These adolescents sing, dance and rap. They are making a demo reel for auditions.



[Soundbite] Eum Chae-ri (16, Prospective Singer) : “I think I’m still not good enough. I need to work harder.”



Oh Byeong-hyeon used to be a baseball player. But he belatedly realized that he wants to become a singer. He’s doing his best, but sometimes feels uncertain about his future.



[Soundbite] O Byeong-Hyeon (18, Prospective Singer) : “I often wonder if this is my limit. I’m not really sure about my future. I’m discouraged when he scolds me.”



He shares his worries with other hopefuls. They understand each other since they’re in the same boat.



[Soundbite] Cheon Su-jin (19, Prospective Singer ) : “My peers are preparing for the college entrance exam. Sometimes, I’m not sure about my choice. I’m not getting better and chances never come.”



When they get discouraged, they go see a concert to strengthen their determination. Sometimes, they are able to receive advice directly from popular singers.



[Soundbite]

“How do you get out of a slump?”



[Soundbite] Sung-min (Super Junior Member) : “You should always stay grounded. Think again about why you decided to become a singer.”



The advice helps them soldier on. Voices resound by Mt. Jiri. Girls are practicing pansori by a waterfall.



[Soundbite] Kim Hui-jin (Pansori Apprentice) : “I came her to learn pansori for 20 days during the summer vacation.”



A valley is a perfect place for a pansori class. The teacher gives an example and the pupils follow suit during the class. Then, the students practice individually by the falls.



[Soundbite] Lee Bo-yeon (Pansori Apprentice) : “I practice listening to my own voice that the teacher recorded during the class.”



They are working hard with a concert scheduled. But in the water, their playfulness shows that they are still just teenage girls. They keep practicing at their residence. The girls are told off when they fail to meet the teacher’s expectations.



[Soundbite] Nam Hye-seong (Pansori Master) : “I feel sorry that they’re apart from their parents and going through hard times. But I need to be tough, if necessary. I often pamper them, too.”



[Soundbite] Lee Myeong-hak (Pansori Apprentice) : “Sometimes, my eyes are filled with tears. I feel like crying, but the teacher disciplines me because he wants me to do better.”



Their families and friends have tried to persuade them to give up on their dreams, telling them they can’t make a good living from being a pansori singer. But the girls still cling to their passion for pansori.



[Soundbite] An Jin-yeong (Pansori Apprentice) : “I want to become a pansory master with various talents and skills.”



These teenagers are doing best to make their dreams come true. They hope that they will be able to reap the benefits of their efforts in the future.
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