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Grocery Hikes
입력 2010.10.08 (17:34) News Today
자동재생
동영상영역 시작
동영상영역 끝
[Anchor Lead]

Many Koreans fear going to the market lately due to surging prices. Inflation on groceries has posted the steepest growth in two years. Eighteen of the 20 items with the highest price hikes are agricultural or marine products.



[Pkg]

People line up at markets where cabbage is sold at a discount.



[Soundbite] I’ll share this with my children and grandchildren.



[Soundbite] (Aren’t you throwing away some of the leaves?) / It’s so expensive. There’s nothing to throw away.



Large supermarket chains have also begun to give a discount on cabbage. But the purchasing limit is six heads of cabbage per person.



[Soundbite] I need many cabbages to share with relatives and many others.



The prices of other fresh vegetables have also surged, with groceries seeing their highest inflation in two years. Prices last month grew 4.1 percent year-on-year, the highest since 4.8 percent in October 2008. The prices of 116 out of 152 items have risen, or 76 percent. Conspicuous among those items are lettuce, zucchini and radish, whose prices have shot up more than 150 percent. Fruit prices also rank 18th in inflation among groceries. So all agricultural and fishery products are seeing higher prices. The Strategy and Finance Ministry says unusual weather conditions led to a poor harvest this year. The government is also devising measures to secure a stable supply of agro-fisheries products.



2. Animal Damage



[Anchor Lead]

As vegetable prices go through the roof, cabbages now cost nearly nine U.S. dollars each. So protecting vegetable fields has become critical for farmers. They are on high alert, as wild animals often destroy their coprs.



[Pkg]

This cabbage was destroyed with its leaves torn apart. Other unrooted cabbages are withering. A fourth of cabbages in this field was destroyed by boars and water deer, which often appear in this area recently.



[Soundbite] Im Sang-gyun (Cabbage Farmer): We’re so disappointed. The damage is so huge.



The situation is the same at nearby radish fields. Water deer intruded into the field and ate up radish leaves. Farmers have been expecting greater profit from soaring vegetable prices in recent days. But the uninvited wild animals are posing a threat to their business. Farmers are desperate to protect their fields and products. They install electric wired fences and traps around their fields to chase away wild animals.



[Soundbite] Hwang Yong-ha (Agricultural Tech & Extension Center): The production of vegetables is expected to drop by over 20 percent due to frequent heavy rains during the summer and damage by water deer.



Farmers are concerned about damage caused by wild animals ahead of the harvest season.



3. Lack of Exercise



[Anchor Lead]

A study has found that nearly half of 30-something employees in Korea rarely exercise. Twenty minutes of daily exercise is an important part of good health. Never exercising can lead to heightened vulnerability to adult diseases.



[Pkg]

A park is bustling with people who exercise early in the morning. Most of them are in their 50s or 60s. Younger people are hardly seen. Seoul Asan Medical Center says 48 percent of 30-something people who received physicals admitted that they never exercise.



[Soundbite] I sometimes think that I need to exercise. But I’m overwhelmed by work and house chores. It’s hard to get some time to exercise.



Lack of exercise is a health hazard. Many of those surveyed were obese and had hypertension. These are the initial signs of adult diseases. Becoming obese in your 30s due to lack of exercise can lead to high blood pressure, diabetes and hyperlipemia. The threat of cerebral hemorrhage or heart disease between the ages of 50 and 60 also rises.



[Soundbite] Prof. Choi Jae-won (Asan Medical Center): Everyone can squeeze out 10 or 20 minutes a day to exercise. It is the best to exercise until you sweat.



People in their 40s should retain their muscle mass by doing simple exercises such as push-ups. The tangible effects of exercise can be felt in just three months. So not giving up halfway is important.



4. Rescue Bikes



[Anchor Lead]

A motorcycle ambulance has been introduced. Motorbikes can make their way through alleys and avoid traffic and will therefore greatly help to save lives.



[Pkg]

[Soundbite] We’ve got a call from Sejongno Street. Emergency squads start now.



Report of a heart attack patient comes in. The motorcycle and the ambulance car both set out. They cannot lose one second. But the ambulance is stuck in traffic... while the motorbike drives through alleyways and in between cars. It took four minutes to reach the patient, but the ambulance arrived four minutes later.



[Soundbite] Lee Yong (Motorcycle Rescue Squad): Motorbikes work better on narrow streets so we expect to save many more patients.



These emergency motorcycles will be operated at ten fire stations in Seoul on a trial basis to quicken rescue operations. They will run in areas where there are particularly many alleyways and chronic congestion. If the results are successful, the motorbikes will be placed at all 22 fire stations in Seoul. So-called medic-helicopters which carry doctors for rescue work at mountains have also been introduced on a trial basis.



[Soundbite] Dr. Kwak Young-ho (Seoul National University): The medic-helicopters are gaining importance in rescuing emergency and critical patients from far away.



The motorcycles that began service on Friday are expected to sharply raise the rescue rate of extra emergency patients in the capital city.



5. Talking Elephant



[Anchor Lead]

A Korean saying goes that even a dog that goes to school for three years will learn to read. Now, an elephant at a Korean zoo can mimic human speech after ten years of training. Foreign scientists are intrigued by the talking pachyderm and have visited the zoo to find out more.



[Pkg]

The star at this zoo in Gyeonggi Province is a talking elephant.



[Soundbite] Trainer: Hi? / Elephant: Hi?



The visitors are amazed.



[Soundbite] It says good. It’s really amazing.



Elephants have no tongues or vocal cords so they can only make simple sounds. But this elephant repeats human words by sticking and curling his nose inside his mouth like a tongue.



[Soundbite] Good.



The elephant can pronounce several words. The words are those mainly used by its trainer. The elephant is the only mammal known to mimic human speech. Foreign scientists have studied an elephant mimicking the sound of a truck engine and published their findings in Nature magazine in 2005. They’ve visited Korea to study the elephant at the Gyeonggi zoo.



[Soundbite] Prof. Angela Stoeger Horwath (University of Vienna)



They plan to publish their research results in magazines such as Nature or Science. The talking Korean elephant is set for global stardom.



6. PIFF Opening



[Anchor Lead]

This year’s Pusan International Film Festival opened on Thursday evening for a nine-day run. The festival attracts cineastes from around the world to the Korean port city. Busan will be teeming with the energy of the movies until October 15th.



[Pkg]

The 15th Pusan International Film Festival opened on Thursday evening. The audience give enthusiastic applause, as some 200 Korean and foreign movie stars appear on the red carpet. The five-thousand seats are filled with viewers. The opening movie is "Under the Hawthorn Tree" directed by Zhang Yimou of China. The film depict innocent love between a young couple against backdrop of the Cultural Revolution. Three-hundred and six films from 67 countries around the world will be shown during the festival. The total number of films is down from last year. But half of the films shown will be world premieres. And fifty-two movies will be shown on foreign soil for the first time. Unknown films from unfamiliar regions, including a Kurdish movie, will also be introduced. Old movies by renowned Korean directors will take people on time travel to the past.



[Soundbite] Kim Dong-ho (Executive Chairman, PIFF): I can say that the Pusan International Film Festival is now a globally renowned film festival. It offers a wide variety of movies and events.



The PIFF will run for nine days until October 15th.



7. College Festival



[Anchor Lead]

Most university festivals are held on campus for students only. But a provincial college has offered city residents a popular spicy rice dish called bibimbap to encourage them to participate.



[Pkg]

A bowl 3.3 meters in diameter is unveiled and seasoned greens are shown. Fifteen types of green picked from Mount Sokri including aster have been cooked and seasoned. Steaming hot rice is mixed in with a large paddle as tall as an adult. This dish is bibimbap, a traditional favorite in Korea. More than 760 people eat together under the warm autumn sun, making it more delicious.



[Soundbite] It has mushroom, greens and sesame oil in it. Everything’s good including the red pepper sauce.



The Seowon University fall event even introduced the rice dish to foreigners.



[Soundbite] German Tourist



The university has faced internal trouble for years due to foundation issues. But the school prepared the event to get residents to participate in the festival.



[Soundbite] Hong Yo-sep (V. President, Student Council): The 700 stands for the 7,000 students and 60 means the 600,000 citizens of Cheongju. That’s why we went for 760 servings.



The Seowon student body has also delivered rice to more than 300 lower-income senior citizens.



8. Show Screenings



[Anchor Lead]

Enjoying opera or orchestra performances at movie theaters is becoming a global trend these days. The audience can more affordably enjoy the shows and the performance groups can also attract new viewers.



[Pkg]

This is a concert screening of the world renowned U.S. Metropolitan Opera. Actual ticket prices to their performance are very high, but audiences only pay the ticket price for a movie. With screen resolution four times clearer than high definition and high-tech sound system, you can get a glimpse of the back stage scene. Metropolitan Opera performances are screened at movie theaters in 44 countries.



[Soundbite] Live is still better than on screen but at least I can watch it this way. It’s great.



More performances groups including the Berlin Philharmonic and the British National Theater are following suit. Also in Korea, singer Wheesung’s concert has been screened in theaters. It’s the first of its kind as a performance content made for a theater. It will likely be screened in other countries as well. Cultural performances on the movie screen is reaching out to new audiences as a new global trend.



9. Stress Relief



[Anchor Lead]

Studying is a job for students. As such, they also need a break so they can let of some steam and then go back to the books feeling refreshed. Some schools are changing their outlook to provide more fun for students. One encourages students to set records in fields such as hacky sack and Rubik’s cube.



[Pkg]

Classes must be in full swing at other schools around this time. But at this school, students are preparing for a special event. They’re taking part in a school record-setting competition.



[Soundbite] Yang Ga-hun (Teacher): Students can participate in fields that they’re good at. They can ease their stress while taking part in the competition.



This Korean form of hacky sack is called jaegi, and uses a shuttlecock. Students show off their skills as they improve with practice. This student has already bounced the shuttlecock 50 times.



[Soundbite] Let me announce the result. The winner is Kim Gi-seok from room number 4.



The record-setter gets a certificate. The school began holding the contest last year, and it’s drawn an enthusiastic response from students. Here is another chance to show off their talent. It’s a Rubik’s cube contest. The student who solves the puzzle in the shortest time will win the competition. The students pour all their focus into their cubes.



[Soundbite] Jeong Gi-yeol (Student): Solving the puzzle helps stimulate my brain and improve critical thinking skills and creativity.





This time, an economic quiz is being held. Students proposed the quiz themselves. They want to become economists when they grow up. The problems were selected and posed by students. The atmosphere heats up as the problems get more difficult. Only one student can be the winner.



[Soundbite] Choi Won-ho (Student): We can get to know each other better while solving probelms together. I can have more contests like this Economic Guinness Test.



A truck pulls into a high school in Seoul in the morning.



[Soundbite] Kim Dong-hun (Supplier): We supply fruits to the school cafeteria.



In Seoul, ten high schools sell fruit at their cafeterias. This school began sales in September. The cafeteria is crowded with students who want to buy fruit. Fresh fruit costs less than one U.S. dollar apiece.



[Soundbite] Give me some fruit.



Teachers also come in to pick up some fruit for their students.



[Soundbite] Eat this fruit and study harder this morning. / (Yes, I will.)



The students are moved by the gift from their teacher.



[Soundbite] Seo Dong-hyeon (Student): I feel refreshed after eating some fruit. Now I can really concentrate.



High schools are embracing bold changes to show that they care about their students.
  • Grocery Hikes
    • 입력 2010-10-08 17:34:36
    News Today
[Anchor Lead]

Many Koreans fear going to the market lately due to surging prices. Inflation on groceries has posted the steepest growth in two years. Eighteen of the 20 items with the highest price hikes are agricultural or marine products.



[Pkg]

People line up at markets where cabbage is sold at a discount.



[Soundbite] I’ll share this with my children and grandchildren.



[Soundbite] (Aren’t you throwing away some of the leaves?) / It’s so expensive. There’s nothing to throw away.



Large supermarket chains have also begun to give a discount on cabbage. But the purchasing limit is six heads of cabbage per person.



[Soundbite] I need many cabbages to share with relatives and many others.



The prices of other fresh vegetables have also surged, with groceries seeing their highest inflation in two years. Prices last month grew 4.1 percent year-on-year, the highest since 4.8 percent in October 2008. The prices of 116 out of 152 items have risen, or 76 percent. Conspicuous among those items are lettuce, zucchini and radish, whose prices have shot up more than 150 percent. Fruit prices also rank 18th in inflation among groceries. So all agricultural and fishery products are seeing higher prices. The Strategy and Finance Ministry says unusual weather conditions led to a poor harvest this year. The government is also devising measures to secure a stable supply of agro-fisheries products.



2. Animal Damage



[Anchor Lead]

As vegetable prices go through the roof, cabbages now cost nearly nine U.S. dollars each. So protecting vegetable fields has become critical for farmers. They are on high alert, as wild animals often destroy their coprs.



[Pkg]

This cabbage was destroyed with its leaves torn apart. Other unrooted cabbages are withering. A fourth of cabbages in this field was destroyed by boars and water deer, which often appear in this area recently.



[Soundbite] Im Sang-gyun (Cabbage Farmer): We’re so disappointed. The damage is so huge.



The situation is the same at nearby radish fields. Water deer intruded into the field and ate up radish leaves. Farmers have been expecting greater profit from soaring vegetable prices in recent days. But the uninvited wild animals are posing a threat to their business. Farmers are desperate to protect their fields and products. They install electric wired fences and traps around their fields to chase away wild animals.



[Soundbite] Hwang Yong-ha (Agricultural Tech & Extension Center): The production of vegetables is expected to drop by over 20 percent due to frequent heavy rains during the summer and damage by water deer.



Farmers are concerned about damage caused by wild animals ahead of the harvest season.



3. Lack of Exercise



[Anchor Lead]

A study has found that nearly half of 30-something employees in Korea rarely exercise. Twenty minutes of daily exercise is an important part of good health. Never exercising can lead to heightened vulnerability to adult diseases.



[Pkg]

A park is bustling with people who exercise early in the morning. Most of them are in their 50s or 60s. Younger people are hardly seen. Seoul Asan Medical Center says 48 percent of 30-something people who received physicals admitted that they never exercise.



[Soundbite] I sometimes think that I need to exercise. But I’m overwhelmed by work and house chores. It’s hard to get some time to exercise.



Lack of exercise is a health hazard. Many of those surveyed were obese and had hypertension. These are the initial signs of adult diseases. Becoming obese in your 30s due to lack of exercise can lead to high blood pressure, diabetes and hyperlipemia. The threat of cerebral hemorrhage or heart disease between the ages of 50 and 60 also rises.



[Soundbite] Prof. Choi Jae-won (Asan Medical Center): Everyone can squeeze out 10 or 20 minutes a day to exercise. It is the best to exercise until you sweat.



People in their 40s should retain their muscle mass by doing simple exercises such as push-ups. The tangible effects of exercise can be felt in just three months. So not giving up halfway is important.



4. Rescue Bikes



[Anchor Lead]

A motorcycle ambulance has been introduced. Motorbikes can make their way through alleys and avoid traffic and will therefore greatly help to save lives.



[Pkg]

[Soundbite] We’ve got a call from Sejongno Street. Emergency squads start now.



Report of a heart attack patient comes in. The motorcycle and the ambulance car both set out. They cannot lose one second. But the ambulance is stuck in traffic... while the motorbike drives through alleyways and in between cars. It took four minutes to reach the patient, but the ambulance arrived four minutes later.



[Soundbite] Lee Yong (Motorcycle Rescue Squad): Motorbikes work better on narrow streets so we expect to save many more patients.



These emergency motorcycles will be operated at ten fire stations in Seoul on a trial basis to quicken rescue operations. They will run in areas where there are particularly many alleyways and chronic congestion. If the results are successful, the motorbikes will be placed at all 22 fire stations in Seoul. So-called medic-helicopters which carry doctors for rescue work at mountains have also been introduced on a trial basis.



[Soundbite] Dr. Kwak Young-ho (Seoul National University): The medic-helicopters are gaining importance in rescuing emergency and critical patients from far away.



The motorcycles that began service on Friday are expected to sharply raise the rescue rate of extra emergency patients in the capital city.



5. Talking Elephant



[Anchor Lead]

A Korean saying goes that even a dog that goes to school for three years will learn to read. Now, an elephant at a Korean zoo can mimic human speech after ten years of training. Foreign scientists are intrigued by the talking pachyderm and have visited the zoo to find out more.



[Pkg]

The star at this zoo in Gyeonggi Province is a talking elephant.



[Soundbite] Trainer: Hi? / Elephant: Hi?



The visitors are amazed.



[Soundbite] It says good. It’s really amazing.



Elephants have no tongues or vocal cords so they can only make simple sounds. But this elephant repeats human words by sticking and curling his nose inside his mouth like a tongue.



[Soundbite] Good.



The elephant can pronounce several words. The words are those mainly used by its trainer. The elephant is the only mammal known to mimic human speech. Foreign scientists have studied an elephant mimicking the sound of a truck engine and published their findings in Nature magazine in 2005. They’ve visited Korea to study the elephant at the Gyeonggi zoo.



[Soundbite] Prof. Angela Stoeger Horwath (University of Vienna)



They plan to publish their research results in magazines such as Nature or Science. The talking Korean elephant is set for global stardom.



6. PIFF Opening



[Anchor Lead]

This year’s Pusan International Film Festival opened on Thursday evening for a nine-day run. The festival attracts cineastes from around the world to the Korean port city. Busan will be teeming with the energy of the movies until October 15th.



[Pkg]

The 15th Pusan International Film Festival opened on Thursday evening. The audience give enthusiastic applause, as some 200 Korean and foreign movie stars appear on the red carpet. The five-thousand seats are filled with viewers. The opening movie is "Under the Hawthorn Tree" directed by Zhang Yimou of China. The film depict innocent love between a young couple against backdrop of the Cultural Revolution. Three-hundred and six films from 67 countries around the world will be shown during the festival. The total number of films is down from last year. But half of the films shown will be world premieres. And fifty-two movies will be shown on foreign soil for the first time. Unknown films from unfamiliar regions, including a Kurdish movie, will also be introduced. Old movies by renowned Korean directors will take people on time travel to the past.



[Soundbite] Kim Dong-ho (Executive Chairman, PIFF): I can say that the Pusan International Film Festival is now a globally renowned film festival. It offers a wide variety of movies and events.



The PIFF will run for nine days until October 15th.



7. College Festival



[Anchor Lead]

Most university festivals are held on campus for students only. But a provincial college has offered city residents a popular spicy rice dish called bibimbap to encourage them to participate.



[Pkg]

A bowl 3.3 meters in diameter is unveiled and seasoned greens are shown. Fifteen types of green picked from Mount Sokri including aster have been cooked and seasoned. Steaming hot rice is mixed in with a large paddle as tall as an adult. This dish is bibimbap, a traditional favorite in Korea. More than 760 people eat together under the warm autumn sun, making it more delicious.



[Soundbite] It has mushroom, greens and sesame oil in it. Everything’s good including the red pepper sauce.



The Seowon University fall event even introduced the rice dish to foreigners.



[Soundbite] German Tourist



The university has faced internal trouble for years due to foundation issues. But the school prepared the event to get residents to participate in the festival.



[Soundbite] Hong Yo-sep (V. President, Student Council): The 700 stands for the 7,000 students and 60 means the 600,000 citizens of Cheongju. That’s why we went for 760 servings.



The Seowon student body has also delivered rice to more than 300 lower-income senior citizens.



8. Show Screenings



[Anchor Lead]

Enjoying opera or orchestra performances at movie theaters is becoming a global trend these days. The audience can more affordably enjoy the shows and the performance groups can also attract new viewers.



[Pkg]

This is a concert screening of the world renowned U.S. Metropolitan Opera. Actual ticket prices to their performance are very high, but audiences only pay the ticket price for a movie. With screen resolution four times clearer than high definition and high-tech sound system, you can get a glimpse of the back stage scene. Metropolitan Opera performances are screened at movie theaters in 44 countries.



[Soundbite] Live is still better than on screen but at least I can watch it this way. It’s great.



More performances groups including the Berlin Philharmonic and the British National Theater are following suit. Also in Korea, singer Wheesung’s concert has been screened in theaters. It’s the first of its kind as a performance content made for a theater. It will likely be screened in other countries as well. Cultural performances on the movie screen is reaching out to new audiences as a new global trend.



9. Stress Relief



[Anchor Lead]

Studying is a job for students. As such, they also need a break so they can let of some steam and then go back to the books feeling refreshed. Some schools are changing their outlook to provide more fun for students. One encourages students to set records in fields such as hacky sack and Rubik’s cube.



[Pkg]

Classes must be in full swing at other schools around this time. But at this school, students are preparing for a special event. They’re taking part in a school record-setting competition.



[Soundbite] Yang Ga-hun (Teacher): Students can participate in fields that they’re good at. They can ease their stress while taking part in the competition.



This Korean form of hacky sack is called jaegi, and uses a shuttlecock. Students show off their skills as they improve with practice. This student has already bounced the shuttlecock 50 times.



[Soundbite] Let me announce the result. The winner is Kim Gi-seok from room number 4.



The record-setter gets a certificate. The school began holding the contest last year, and it’s drawn an enthusiastic response from students. Here is another chance to show off their talent. It’s a Rubik’s cube contest. The student who solves the puzzle in the shortest time will win the competition. The students pour all their focus into their cubes.



[Soundbite] Jeong Gi-yeol (Student): Solving the puzzle helps stimulate my brain and improve critical thinking skills and creativity.





This time, an economic quiz is being held. Students proposed the quiz themselves. They want to become economists when they grow up. The problems were selected and posed by students. The atmosphere heats up as the problems get more difficult. Only one student can be the winner.



[Soundbite] Choi Won-ho (Student): We can get to know each other better while solving probelms together. I can have more contests like this Economic Guinness Test.



A truck pulls into a high school in Seoul in the morning.



[Soundbite] Kim Dong-hun (Supplier): We supply fruits to the school cafeteria.



In Seoul, ten high schools sell fruit at their cafeterias. This school began sales in September. The cafeteria is crowded with students who want to buy fruit. Fresh fruit costs less than one U.S. dollar apiece.



[Soundbite] Give me some fruit.



Teachers also come in to pick up some fruit for their students.



[Soundbite] Eat this fruit and study harder this morning. / (Yes, I will.)



The students are moved by the gift from their teacher.



[Soundbite] Seo Dong-hyeon (Student): I feel refreshed after eating some fruit. Now I can really concentrate.



High schools are embracing bold changes to show that they care about their students.
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