기사 본문 영역

상세페이지

NK Hacked
입력 2011.01.10 (18:34) News Today
자동재생
동영상영역 시작
동영상영역 끝
[Anchor Lead]



A North Korean propaganda Web site has been hacked by critics of the communist regime. Messages blasting North Korean leader Kim Jong-il have been posted on the North’s Twitter account. The messages also appeared on the birthday of North Korea’s heir apparent, Kim Jong-un.



[Pkg]



Several messages criticizing North Korean leader Kim Jong-il and his heir apparent have been posted on the Twitter account of the North Korean Web site "Uriminjokkkiri.” One message urges the expulsion of the ruling Kim family and the creation of a new country. Another implores the North Korean people to point the gun at their government, saying Pyongyang has wasted 1.4 billion U.S. dollars on nuclear weapons and missiles. Other messages lament the impoverished nature of North Koreans. They also press for the execution of Kim Jong-il, saying he throws extravagant parties while 3 million of his people have starved to death. The messages were posted by a user with the English-language moniker "Uriminjok." They were uploaded at 7:20 a.m. Saturday, when North Korea’s heir apparent Kim Jong-un celebrated his birthday. A parody video mocking Kim Jong-un was also posted under the name of the North’s Youtube account. The clip shows him hitting people while driving a sports car and calling North Koreans are useless. The messages and video clip indicate growing resistance to the North’s third-generation father-to-son power succession within the Stalinist country.



2. Defector Aid



[Anchor Lead]



It’s not easy for North Korean defectors to find jobs and settle down in South Korea. Seoul is planning to help them settle here by encouraging them to start their own businesses.



[Pkg]



A North Korean defector, Lee Seong-il, started a small business late last year. He borrowed 36,000 dollars from a Smile Microcredit Bank at the annual interest of two percent. Lee now earns an average of some 1,800 dollars a month.



[Soundbite]Lee Seong-il (NK Defector): “It’s very helpful. It’s a good source of money, isn’t it? That’s the biggest thing.”



Twenty seven North Korean defectors received financial support for starting their own business last year. The government is planning to help North Korean defectors stand on their feet by encouraging them to start their own businesses. Securing the nest money does not ease the problem. Starting a business is difficult for North Korean defectors because they are not familiar with South Korea’s social structure.



[Soundbite] U Yeong-chan (Hyundai Smile Microcredit Bank): “North Korean escapees have completely different ideas about capitalism and trade. We offer more than 80 hours of special education.”



Prejudices over the North Korean defectors are also obstacles.



[Soundbite](NK Defector): “Not everyone is prejudiced, but there are still some biased people.”



Now, there are 20-thousand North Korean defectors in South Korea. The government will employ various methods this year to encourage North Korean escapees to start businesses.



3. Farmer Pensions



[Anchor Lead]



An annuity that provides a monthly pension from farmland mortgages has been launched this year. It’s received a positive response from elderly farmers who’re having a hard time making ends meet.



[Pkg]



Kang Seok-nam has run a farm for about ten years. The 67-year-old farmer will sign up for a farmland annuity.



[Soundbite]Kang Seok-nam (Farmer): “Now I’m too old to keep working and my income is too low.”



He needs another income source to make ends meet. A farmland annuity launched this year has attracted more than 20-thousand phone inquiries from all over the country. Some 280 farmers have signed up. Fields, rice paddies and orchards serve as collateral for the annuity. A farmer can still farm or lend the land while receiving the monthly pension. Farmers aged 65 or older with farmland of 30-thousand square meters or less are eligible for the annuity. The pension amount is calculated according to the farmland’s price and the applicant’s age. But critics call the system unrealistic, saying the official price instead of the market price will be used to appraise the farmland’s value. Nonetheless the farmland annuity holds promise as a safety net for the silver members of the domestic agricultural community.



4. Smart Gadgets



[Anchor Lead]



Home appliances like refrigerators and washing machines can work wonders with everyday chores when combined with smartphone technology and the Internet. Here’s more on smart Korean appliances that were showcased at the latest Consumer Electronics Show.



[Pkg]



The International Consumer Electronics Show is the world’s largest consumer technology trade show that showcases high-tech products. This smart refrigerator has an 8-inch display. Users can watch news on leave messages on the monitor.



[Soundbite]Stasha Toomie (Samsung Electronics America)



Home appliances connected to the Internet via wireless local area networks enable users to connect to the outside world. Every time a user adds new products to the refrigerator, the list of products is updated, while the storage period of each product is displayed on screen. Users can check the content of their refrigerators any time using their smartphones.



[Soundbite]Jeong Dae-hui (Researcher, LG Electronics): “Consumers can see what’s in their fridge while they’re doing their grocery shopping without using a separate shopping list.”



Washing machines are also going smart. They feature more sophisticated functions such as a special function for washing baby clothes. Home appliances are spearheading the "smart revolution" thanks to the Internet and smartphones.



5. Air Force Avatars



[Anchor Lead]



The military is using advanced technology to produce properly fitting uniforms for soldiers. The new method uses 3-D avatars to obtain an ideal fit.



[Pkg]



Soldiers line up to have their body measurements taken. An automated body scanner takes 19 measurements including the wrists, forearms and calves. The measurements are automatically input into a computer to create an avatar for each soldier. The soldiers try on different military uniforms using their avatars. They can adjust the waist and width of pants as they like.



[Soundbite]A1C Park Jae-yeong (Air Force Supply Battalion): “Our soldiers are very satisfied with the results. We have fewer soldiers exchanging their uniforms because they don’t fit.”



Automatically produced patterns of military uniforms are distributed to soldiers and can be used by any custom tailor.



[Soundbite]Maj. Lee Sang-hun (Commander, Air Force Supply Battalion): “Uniforms used to be different depending on the manufacturer. The problem has been solved; the new uniforms fit well.”



The Air Force began producing the avatar-based uniform early this month. The Marines will introduce automated body scanners as early as the first half of this year. The Army has launched a service that measures the dimensions of a uniform based on a soldier’s body size.



6. Waste Solutions



[Anchor Lead]



Fifteen-thousand tons of food are thrown away every day in the Korea. Processing food waste is a big problem. But recently, live organisms have emerged as a natural solution.



[Pkg]



A homemaker buries skin of apples in soil on her balcony. Living inside the soil are worms.



[Soundbite] “Worms eat all kinds of food waste, such as fruits and vegetables.”



More than 70 households in this apartment complex grow worms in their homes to process food waste, which allows to cut food waste by 13 percent annually.



[Soundbite] “It was disgusting in the beginning but after feeding them they’re not that gross anymore. Now I’m very used to them.”



Black Soldier fly larvae are also known as natural sanitary engineers. They process seven tons of food waste in 10 villages in Jeju Island. All by-products are used as compost.



[Soundbite] “It’s proven that natural composing works better than chemical fertilizer for potato growth.”



One of its shortcomings is that the larvae are less active in winter. Warm facilities will help solve the food waste processing problems in small towns.



7. Muscle Workout



[Anchor Lead]



Exercise that builds muscle is as important as aerobic exercise. The secret to longevity may lie in keeping your muscles fit.



[Pkg]



The human body has more than 650 muscles. Muscle mass is reduced with age and replaced by fat. The amount of muscles decreases 1 percent a year in people over age 40. Muscles are an engine that consumes calorie. People with less muscle mass tend to get fat even if they exercise or are just as active as others.



[Soundbite]Park Hyeong-il (Personal Trainer): “Increased muscle tone through exercise stimulates the metabolism and helps reduce fat.”



The same principle also applies to women. Women need muscle building exercises to keep in shape.



[Soundbite]Jo Hyeon-seon (Personal Trainer): “Women have lower muscular strength. Squats and push-ups are recommended.”



Thin people don’t necessarily live longer. All people see their weight and muscles decrease with age. Fat replaces muscles that disappear.



[Soundbite]Prof. Park Won-ha (Samsung Seoul Hospital): “A decrease in muscles and an increase in fat lead to obesity and different adult diseases.”



So the elderly lacking muscles are twice as likely to die than those who have a sufficient amount. To develop muscles in the lower body, sit and get up or lift the hips while leaning against the wall. Push-ups and sit-ups are good for the upper body. Three sets of 15 repetitions each are advised. Building muscles is one secret to leading a healthy and long life.



8. Trout Festival



[Anchor Lead]



Pyeongchang in Gangwon province is hosting a trout festival, attracting hardy tourists willing to brave the freezing winter weather outside.



[Pkg]



The frozen Odae Stream has turned into a giant fishing spot. People make holes on the frozen stream and put fishing poles in them, and they wait for hours.



[Soundbite] “I caught a trout!”



People are excited when they catch an arm-sized, big Masou Salmon.



[Soundbite] “I don’t like fishing. But it’s a special experience to catch trout here.”



Some people in short pants and shirts try to catch trout with bare hands. They forget about the sub-zero weather while picking up trout. Snow sledding awaits for those who got tired of fishing. They go sledding and ride bicycles and mini motorcycles on the ice. The people enjoy the winter activities with their families.



[Soundbite] “I can enjoy the winter. My children had fun while catching fish. It’s a good family outing.”



Pyeongchang is aiming to win the bid to host the 2018 Winter Olympics. The city is heating up with people who want to enjoy the seasonal zest.



9. Yeontan Time



[Anchor Lead]



Charcoal briquettes, known as yeontan in Korea, were once a staple in every home here. Nowadays, they’re fading into the background, but some still rely on them to keep their homes warm or to make a living. Let’s go now to a 43-year-old briquette plant and meet the people who work there.



[Pkg]



Briquettes were the most common fuel in Korea in the ’80s but now they’re mostly become a thing of the past. All of the yeontan factories have shut down except for two in Seoul. The peak season for briquettes is from October to March. Deliveries are in high demand. Even in sub-zero temperatures, those who deliever yeontan to people’s homes are breaking a sweat.



[Soundbite]U Jong-im (Retail Briquette Merchant): “What else can I do? These people need yeonyan, but there’s no one to help them out, and it’s all I know how to do. That’s why I keep doing this.”



This plant has been making yeontan for 43 years. The 20 or so workers have also worked here for dozens of years. The briquettes are delivered to all corners of the country. Just like any other day, the briquettes arrive at Hope Village. Mr. Hong Jong-rok has been running a yeontan shop for over two decades here. He made good money up until 20 years ago because every Korean family used briquettes. He raised his son and daughter with money he made from delivering yeontan. But now, things have changed.



[Soundbite]Hong Jong-rok (Briquette Deliverer): “They don’t sell well. I need to sell about 250 units or maybe 300. This is my first delivery in three days.”



Last year, he injured his ankle in a street cart incident while on a delivery. But he couldn’t stop working because many people at Hope Village wait for daily deliveries.



[Soundbite] “We’re so grateful. Who else would deliver yeontan nowadays?”



The village people serve Mr. Hong tea when he drops off their yeontan.



[Soundbite]Hong Jong-rok (Briquette Deliverer): “The yeontan will keep them warm in the winter, which is very rewarding. There’s really nothing else to it.”



This little restaurant in an alleyway in Incheon sells grilled fish. They cook with yeontan.



[Soundbite]Park In-suk (Restaurant Owner): “Grilling fish in a microwave or on a frying pan doesn’t give the best taste.”



The restaurant has been in business for 45 years and has not given up using briquettes. The yeontan-grilled dishes attract customers who like how they remind them of old times.



[Soundbite] “Yeontan were the best when I was young. Mom used to grill mackerels on them. It was the best.”



The remaining few yeontan plants continue to produce briquettes for needy people who can’t afford other fuel, but also for those who prefer to use briquettes for the nostalgia.
  • NK Hacked
    • 입력 2011-01-10 18:34:31
    News Today
[Anchor Lead]



A North Korean propaganda Web site has been hacked by critics of the communist regime. Messages blasting North Korean leader Kim Jong-il have been posted on the North’s Twitter account. The messages also appeared on the birthday of North Korea’s heir apparent, Kim Jong-un.



[Pkg]



Several messages criticizing North Korean leader Kim Jong-il and his heir apparent have been posted on the Twitter account of the North Korean Web site "Uriminjokkkiri.” One message urges the expulsion of the ruling Kim family and the creation of a new country. Another implores the North Korean people to point the gun at their government, saying Pyongyang has wasted 1.4 billion U.S. dollars on nuclear weapons and missiles. Other messages lament the impoverished nature of North Koreans. They also press for the execution of Kim Jong-il, saying he throws extravagant parties while 3 million of his people have starved to death. The messages were posted by a user with the English-language moniker "Uriminjok." They were uploaded at 7:20 a.m. Saturday, when North Korea’s heir apparent Kim Jong-un celebrated his birthday. A parody video mocking Kim Jong-un was also posted under the name of the North’s Youtube account. The clip shows him hitting people while driving a sports car and calling North Koreans are useless. The messages and video clip indicate growing resistance to the North’s third-generation father-to-son power succession within the Stalinist country.



2. Defector Aid



[Anchor Lead]



It’s not easy for North Korean defectors to find jobs and settle down in South Korea. Seoul is planning to help them settle here by encouraging them to start their own businesses.



[Pkg]



A North Korean defector, Lee Seong-il, started a small business late last year. He borrowed 36,000 dollars from a Smile Microcredit Bank at the annual interest of two percent. Lee now earns an average of some 1,800 dollars a month.



[Soundbite]Lee Seong-il (NK Defector): “It’s very helpful. It’s a good source of money, isn’t it? That’s the biggest thing.”



Twenty seven North Korean defectors received financial support for starting their own business last year. The government is planning to help North Korean defectors stand on their feet by encouraging them to start their own businesses. Securing the nest money does not ease the problem. Starting a business is difficult for North Korean defectors because they are not familiar with South Korea’s social structure.



[Soundbite] U Yeong-chan (Hyundai Smile Microcredit Bank): “North Korean escapees have completely different ideas about capitalism and trade. We offer more than 80 hours of special education.”



Prejudices over the North Korean defectors are also obstacles.



[Soundbite](NK Defector): “Not everyone is prejudiced, but there are still some biased people.”



Now, there are 20-thousand North Korean defectors in South Korea. The government will employ various methods this year to encourage North Korean escapees to start businesses.



3. Farmer Pensions



[Anchor Lead]



An annuity that provides a monthly pension from farmland mortgages has been launched this year. It’s received a positive response from elderly farmers who’re having a hard time making ends meet.



[Pkg]



Kang Seok-nam has run a farm for about ten years. The 67-year-old farmer will sign up for a farmland annuity.



[Soundbite]Kang Seok-nam (Farmer): “Now I’m too old to keep working and my income is too low.”



He needs another income source to make ends meet. A farmland annuity launched this year has attracted more than 20-thousand phone inquiries from all over the country. Some 280 farmers have signed up. Fields, rice paddies and orchards serve as collateral for the annuity. A farmer can still farm or lend the land while receiving the monthly pension. Farmers aged 65 or older with farmland of 30-thousand square meters or less are eligible for the annuity. The pension amount is calculated according to the farmland’s price and the applicant’s age. But critics call the system unrealistic, saying the official price instead of the market price will be used to appraise the farmland’s value. Nonetheless the farmland annuity holds promise as a safety net for the silver members of the domestic agricultural community.



4. Smart Gadgets



[Anchor Lead]



Home appliances like refrigerators and washing machines can work wonders with everyday chores when combined with smartphone technology and the Internet. Here’s more on smart Korean appliances that were showcased at the latest Consumer Electronics Show.



[Pkg]



The International Consumer Electronics Show is the world’s largest consumer technology trade show that showcases high-tech products. This smart refrigerator has an 8-inch display. Users can watch news on leave messages on the monitor.



[Soundbite]Stasha Toomie (Samsung Electronics America)



Home appliances connected to the Internet via wireless local area networks enable users to connect to the outside world. Every time a user adds new products to the refrigerator, the list of products is updated, while the storage period of each product is displayed on screen. Users can check the content of their refrigerators any time using their smartphones.



[Soundbite]Jeong Dae-hui (Researcher, LG Electronics): “Consumers can see what’s in their fridge while they’re doing their grocery shopping without using a separate shopping list.”



Washing machines are also going smart. They feature more sophisticated functions such as a special function for washing baby clothes. Home appliances are spearheading the "smart revolution" thanks to the Internet and smartphones.



5. Air Force Avatars



[Anchor Lead]



The military is using advanced technology to produce properly fitting uniforms for soldiers. The new method uses 3-D avatars to obtain an ideal fit.



[Pkg]



Soldiers line up to have their body measurements taken. An automated body scanner takes 19 measurements including the wrists, forearms and calves. The measurements are automatically input into a computer to create an avatar for each soldier. The soldiers try on different military uniforms using their avatars. They can adjust the waist and width of pants as they like.



[Soundbite]A1C Park Jae-yeong (Air Force Supply Battalion): “Our soldiers are very satisfied with the results. We have fewer soldiers exchanging their uniforms because they don’t fit.”



Automatically produced patterns of military uniforms are distributed to soldiers and can be used by any custom tailor.



[Soundbite]Maj. Lee Sang-hun (Commander, Air Force Supply Battalion): “Uniforms used to be different depending on the manufacturer. The problem has been solved; the new uniforms fit well.”



The Air Force began producing the avatar-based uniform early this month. The Marines will introduce automated body scanners as early as the first half of this year. The Army has launched a service that measures the dimensions of a uniform based on a soldier’s body size.



6. Waste Solutions



[Anchor Lead]



Fifteen-thousand tons of food are thrown away every day in the Korea. Processing food waste is a big problem. But recently, live organisms have emerged as a natural solution.



[Pkg]



A homemaker buries skin of apples in soil on her balcony. Living inside the soil are worms.



[Soundbite] “Worms eat all kinds of food waste, such as fruits and vegetables.”



More than 70 households in this apartment complex grow worms in their homes to process food waste, which allows to cut food waste by 13 percent annually.



[Soundbite] “It was disgusting in the beginning but after feeding them they’re not that gross anymore. Now I’m very used to them.”



Black Soldier fly larvae are also known as natural sanitary engineers. They process seven tons of food waste in 10 villages in Jeju Island. All by-products are used as compost.



[Soundbite] “It’s proven that natural composing works better than chemical fertilizer for potato growth.”



One of its shortcomings is that the larvae are less active in winter. Warm facilities will help solve the food waste processing problems in small towns.



7. Muscle Workout



[Anchor Lead]



Exercise that builds muscle is as important as aerobic exercise. The secret to longevity may lie in keeping your muscles fit.



[Pkg]



The human body has more than 650 muscles. Muscle mass is reduced with age and replaced by fat. The amount of muscles decreases 1 percent a year in people over age 40. Muscles are an engine that consumes calorie. People with less muscle mass tend to get fat even if they exercise or are just as active as others.



[Soundbite]Park Hyeong-il (Personal Trainer): “Increased muscle tone through exercise stimulates the metabolism and helps reduce fat.”



The same principle also applies to women. Women need muscle building exercises to keep in shape.



[Soundbite]Jo Hyeon-seon (Personal Trainer): “Women have lower muscular strength. Squats and push-ups are recommended.”



Thin people don’t necessarily live longer. All people see their weight and muscles decrease with age. Fat replaces muscles that disappear.



[Soundbite]Prof. Park Won-ha (Samsung Seoul Hospital): “A decrease in muscles and an increase in fat lead to obesity and different adult diseases.”



So the elderly lacking muscles are twice as likely to die than those who have a sufficient amount. To develop muscles in the lower body, sit and get up or lift the hips while leaning against the wall. Push-ups and sit-ups are good for the upper body. Three sets of 15 repetitions each are advised. Building muscles is one secret to leading a healthy and long life.



8. Trout Festival



[Anchor Lead]



Pyeongchang in Gangwon province is hosting a trout festival, attracting hardy tourists willing to brave the freezing winter weather outside.



[Pkg]



The frozen Odae Stream has turned into a giant fishing spot. People make holes on the frozen stream and put fishing poles in them, and they wait for hours.



[Soundbite] “I caught a trout!”



People are excited when they catch an arm-sized, big Masou Salmon.



[Soundbite] “I don’t like fishing. But it’s a special experience to catch trout here.”



Some people in short pants and shirts try to catch trout with bare hands. They forget about the sub-zero weather while picking up trout. Snow sledding awaits for those who got tired of fishing. They go sledding and ride bicycles and mini motorcycles on the ice. The people enjoy the winter activities with their families.



[Soundbite] “I can enjoy the winter. My children had fun while catching fish. It’s a good family outing.”



Pyeongchang is aiming to win the bid to host the 2018 Winter Olympics. The city is heating up with people who want to enjoy the seasonal zest.



9. Yeontan Time



[Anchor Lead]



Charcoal briquettes, known as yeontan in Korea, were once a staple in every home here. Nowadays, they’re fading into the background, but some still rely on them to keep their homes warm or to make a living. Let’s go now to a 43-year-old briquette plant and meet the people who work there.



[Pkg]



Briquettes were the most common fuel in Korea in the ’80s but now they’re mostly become a thing of the past. All of the yeontan factories have shut down except for two in Seoul. The peak season for briquettes is from October to March. Deliveries are in high demand. Even in sub-zero temperatures, those who deliever yeontan to people’s homes are breaking a sweat.



[Soundbite]U Jong-im (Retail Briquette Merchant): “What else can I do? These people need yeonyan, but there’s no one to help them out, and it’s all I know how to do. That’s why I keep doing this.”



This plant has been making yeontan for 43 years. The 20 or so workers have also worked here for dozens of years. The briquettes are delivered to all corners of the country. Just like any other day, the briquettes arrive at Hope Village. Mr. Hong Jong-rok has been running a yeontan shop for over two decades here. He made good money up until 20 years ago because every Korean family used briquettes. He raised his son and daughter with money he made from delivering yeontan. But now, things have changed.



[Soundbite]Hong Jong-rok (Briquette Deliverer): “They don’t sell well. I need to sell about 250 units or maybe 300. This is my first delivery in three days.”



Last year, he injured his ankle in a street cart incident while on a delivery. But he couldn’t stop working because many people at Hope Village wait for daily deliveries.



[Soundbite] “We’re so grateful. Who else would deliver yeontan nowadays?”



The village people serve Mr. Hong tea when he drops off their yeontan.



[Soundbite]Hong Jong-rok (Briquette Deliverer): “The yeontan will keep them warm in the winter, which is very rewarding. There’s really nothing else to it.”



This little restaurant in an alleyway in Incheon sells grilled fish. They cook with yeontan.



[Soundbite]Park In-suk (Restaurant Owner): “Grilling fish in a microwave or on a frying pan doesn’t give the best taste.”



The restaurant has been in business for 45 years and has not given up using briquettes. The yeontan-grilled dishes attract customers who like how they remind them of old times.



[Soundbite] “Yeontan were the best when I was young. Mom used to grill mackerels on them. It was the best.”



The remaining few yeontan plants continue to produce briquettes for needy people who can’t afford other fuel, but also for those who prefer to use briquettes for the nostalgia.
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