기사 본문 영역

상세페이지

Pollack Return
입력 2011.05.13 (19:46) News Today
자동재생
동영상영역 시작
동영상영역 끝
[Anchor Lead]

Walleye pollack is being caught by the hundreds every days lately after having disappeared from waters off the east coast. The fish had rarely been seen over the past decade, and so it’s fetching high prices.

[Pkg]

Carts filled with walleye pollack are taken to an auction site. The fish were caught overnight in waters off Goseong County, Gangwon Province. They are mid-sized at 30-35 centimeters in length.

[Soundbite](Clerk, Federation of Fisheries Cooperatives): “Twenty three walleye pollack for 129,000 won ($119). It's number 72.”

The walleye pollack was thought to have disappeared but suddenly reappeared in nets in waters off the east coast from Sunday. The first day saw four fishing boats catching 162 of the fish and the next day saw 12 boats caught 360. The fish have been caught for the fifth day. Only one or two had been occasionally caught before. This is the first time in ten years to see catches amounting to hundreds of walleye pollack.

[Soundbite]Park Yeong-seon (Fisherman): “Some caught ten and others even caught 40 to 50.”

The auction price of a single walleye pollack is around five dollars 16 cents. This is three times more than the price of Russian imports of frozen walleye pollack.

[Soundbite]Park Jong-hwa (National Fisheries R&D Institute): “It’s below minus five degrees Celsius in waters 200 meters below sea level. So, walleye pollack can survive.”

Fishery authorities will keep close watch to see if the reappearance of walleye pollack is temporary or permanent.

2. Roh Exhibit

[Anchor Lead]

Two years have passed since the late former President Roh Moo-hyun passed away. A photography exhibition is being held to commemorate him. Let's take a look.

[Pkg]

While campaigning at a market place, the candidate, late Roh Moo-hyun sits down for Korean chess, Jangi. Here's a picture of Roh cheering for the national soccer team during the World Cup games with young Koreans. Though he was president, he puts on his shoes just like any other average Korean middle-aged men. The commemorative exhibition showcases 20 unpublicized photos of Roh's simple and humble life. It also features the bicycles he and his grand daughter rode together after his resignation.

[Soundbite]Moon Jae-in (Chair, Roh Moo-hyun Foundation): “You can see the dreams, challenges and tough times of politician Rho Moo-hyun.”

Former members of the Roh administration remembered his political faith and aim to make a world worth living for everyone. Various events commemorating Roh including exhibitions and cultural events are to be held through May 23rd nationwide including Roh's hometown Bongha and Gwangju.

[Soundbite] “We love you, President Roh Moo-hyun!”

3. Content Market

[Anchor Lead]

The Busan Contents Market, which is becoming the largest broadcast content fair in Asia, opened on Thursday. We take you there now.

[Pkg]

Foreign buyers are crowded at booths selling Korean television shows. The KBS drama 'Bread, Love and Dreams' which aired last year was sold to eleven countries at over three million dollars.

[Soundbite](Chinese Buyer): “Many Chinese love Korean dramas and 70% of dramas approved in China in the past two years have been KBS works.”

With the rising popularity of Korean programs, the Busan Contents Market plays an increasingly significant role. Even broadcasters from the Middle East are participating in this year's event, which is in its fifth year. Participation is also growing each year with 500 companies from 40 countries taking part. Since the Busan market is emerging as the hub of Asian visual content, the transaction volume has also surged.

[Soundbite]Koo Jong-sang (Chairman, Executive Committee): “Transactions are expected to jump from $31 million last year to $51 million this year.”

The market is a venue for not only sales but also for investment and production of TV contents.

[Soundbite]Geum Dong-su (President, KBS Media): “This year's market seeks to expand the Korean Wave through joint investment and productions.”

Different events such as smart media display and documentary screening are held on the sidelines of the fair which continues until tomorrow.

4. Warming Up

[Anchor Lead]

World-class athletes have posted season bests at the Daegu Pre-Championships Meeting in the country's third-largest city. The tournament is a prelude to the World Championships in Athletics that Daegu will host in August.

[Pkg]

The world's best in the women's 200 meters Allyson Felix speeds down the track. She narrows the distance with other runners on the straight section. Felix wins with the season's fastest time of 22.38 seconds, also a record for the Pre-Championships Meeting. She says she's acclimated to the Daegu track in preparation for the IAAF World Championships in August. She dominated the track and seeks her fourth straight world title, the first of which was won in the 2005 Helsinki tournament.

[Soundbite]Allyson Felix (U.S. Splinter)

The world No. 1 in the men's hurdles David Oliver has also joined the battle of the stars. He posts a season-best 13.14 seconds.

Korean pole vaulter Choi Yun-hee brings attention to the host country's athletes by setting a season high of 4.2 meters.

The stadium has been revamped with state-of-the-art tracks to be used in next year's London Summer Olympics. Precision recording devices have also ensured smooth tournament management. Daegu's successful hosting of the preliminary tournament has made the city confident of hosting the IAAF World Championships 107 days later.

5. Fighting Arthritis

[Anchor Lead]

Korean doctors have begun treating the early stages of arthritis using patients’ growth factor, a substance that stimulates cell growth. The new method has proven to be quite effective.

[Pkg]

This 50-something woman has undergone medical treatment because her knees hurt when she goes down a staircase. Her growth factor has been extracted from her blood and inserted into her joints. The growth factor restores the damaged cartilage in joints when inserted into damaged joints through arthroendoscopy. This in turn helps reduce inflammation and alleviate pain.

[Soundbite]Kim Yeong-sil (Early Arthritis Patient): “I'm glad that I can wear shoes now. I couldn't wear them because my knees hurt.”

The method has proved effective in treating the early stages of arthritis in middle-aged patients as well as injury.

[Soundbite]Koh Yong-gon (Director, Yonsei Sarang Hospital): “It can be used at the early and mid-stages of arthritis, when cartilage damage begins. For young patients, it can be used to treat ligament injuries caused by exercise.”

A study conducted by a hospital specializing in joints has shown that 80 percent of patients with early arthritis can be cured by inserting their growth factor into their joints. The effectiveness of this treatment method is especially high because the growth factor is inserted directly into the damaged cartilage through arthroendoscopy. The effect lasts for about a year, which is longer than that of medicine.

6. Digital Tradition

[Anchor Lead]

In traditional Korean medicine, a person's physical constitution is read through the facial features. Now, a device that measures the shape of the face has been approved by the Korea Food and Drug Administration. It's the first digital piece of equipment for traditional medicine to obtain approval.

[Pkg]

A three dimensional scanner scans a patient's face. The distance, angle and surface area in between facial features are automatically measured on the scanned images. Based on the measurements, the patient's physical constitution is diagnosed. A slim face and a big nose represent the constitution of "gallbladder." These people have a high level of body heat but not enough moist. On the other hand, a wide face and thick lips point to the "bladder" constitution. These people are low in stamina and high in moist.

[Soundbite]Prof. Kim Jong-won (Dong-eui University): “The gallbladder constitution needs medication to lower heat or replenish yin-blood. For the bladder constitution, we use drugs that help recharge energy and remove moisture.”

Oriental medicine has been criticized for relying too much on the doctors' subjective point of view. This system will help standardize the traditional medicine.

[Soundbite]Jeong Hui-gyo (Korea Food and Drug Administration): “There's been a lot of talk about developing Korean medicine based on science. It's the first time traditional medical skills has been computerize via clinical testing.”

The Korean medicine industry plans to support development of more medical equipment.

7. Car Trouble

[Anchor Lead]

More than 100-thousand foreign cars have been sold in Korea per year since the domestic market was opened to them 20 years ago. But problems like the high of repairs and costs, services have seen little progress.

[Pkg]

This consumer bought an imported car two months ago. The vehicle suddenly stopped while driving the first day and was rendered useless. The lack of replaceable parts delayed repair. Eventually, the entire transmission was replaced.

[Soundbite]Bang Man-seong (Consumer): “Who'd like to drive a new car that had to have its transmission replaced from the beginning?”

The service center says certain parts are no longer produced. This means no parts exist for car models on sale.

[Soundbite](Staff Member, Service Center (Voice Modified)): “We can't say for sure but the German headquarters said the parts aren't produced any more and advised to replacing the transmission.”

Imported cars accounted for just 1 percent of the domestic car market in 2002. But more than 90-thousand units were sold in Korea last year. The quality of service has not improved a bit and has even worsened in certain cases. BMW is known to have the most service centers in Korea with just 30. This means a one center has to handle an average of 2-thousand to 3-thousand cars. Expensive repair costs are another problem. The costs to replace parts for imported cars are nearly 5.5 times that of domestic cars and those for panel beating and painting are also far more expensive for foreign cars. The hourly labor cost for mechanics is also higher.

[Soundbite]Park Sang-yong (Consumer): “The center charged more than 2 million won (US$1,838) just for replacing a bumper. But I'm paying only 500 thousand won (US$460) here for fixing and reusing the old bumper.”

Mercedes Benz and BMW raked in a combined 919 million dollars last year in sales. Mercedes is known to send 90 percent of its profits to headquarters and BMW 62.5 percent.

8. One of the Gang

[Anchor Lead]

A high school teacher in Bonghwa County, North Gyeongsang Province is drawing the spotlight for wearing a school uniform just like his students. Let's go meet him.

[Pkg]

This math teacher is wearing a school uniform just like his students. He is also in charge of student guidance.

[Soundbite]Jeon Ji-hye (Student): “I was surprised and amazed to see our teacher wearing the same uniform as us. It gives me the feeling that he can understand us more.”

He began wearing the school uniform in March. He wears it all day at school. He says he wanted to get closer to the students.

[Soundbite]Lee Mu-yeong (Teacher): “I wanted to blend in among the students to draw out their potential and spontaneity. I think I have done that.”

Understanding the teacher's good will, the students are also changing; they keep the hallway clean and follow rules voluntarily without the teacher's
directions.

[Soundbite]Lee Dong-hun (Student): “Seeing our teacher try so hard, we wanted to return his love for us.”

The teacher's efforts have torn down the wall between teacher and student and has created a positive new campus culture.

9. Future Maestros

[Anchor Lead]

El Sistema is the Venezuelan national symphonic orchestra's program for children from underprivileged families. It was adopted in Korea this year. Thanks to the program, students from a small countryside school in South Gyeongsang Province are getting a chance to reach for new dreams. Let's get a closer look.

[Pkg]

Children from seventeen villages gather at a mountainside elementary school in Uiryeong County, South Gyeongsang Province. The school's total population is a mere 20 kids. The children suddenly break into cheers. It's because of these violins.

[Soundbite]Park Ji-yeon (Teacher): “We're happy too to see the kids so happy to get violins.”

Venezuela's national orchestra has a program for making children from poor neighborhoods into musicians. It’s called El Sistema, an educational revolution through music. The system has been adopted in Korea for young students in rural areas.

[Soundbite] “It's awesome! I like it.”

[Soundbite] “I'm going to practice hard!”

The kids are about to meet their violin teacher.

[Soundbite]Jeon Hyeon-so (Jinju Symphonic Orchestra): “Nice to meet you everyone. I’m Jeon Hyeon-so and I'm here to give you violin lessons starting today.”

This is the first time the kids have laid their hands on musical instruments. Now, they're getting lessons to point them in the right musical direction. Right after school gets out, Hae-jin hurries off to the greenhouse where her parents are working. She happily shows off her new violin. She plays the tune she’s just learned, a private recital for mom and dad.

[Soundbite]Sin Yun-mi (Parent): “It's so hard to find a place to get lessons. I'm thankful see to our daughter play.”

As Hae-jin carefully takes out her violin from its case at home, her little sisters rush in to get a closer look. She does her best to guard it from them so they can’t break it. Eventually, she falls asleep with the violin carefully laid beside her. The children gather to practice before class and after school. A couple of teachers quietly sneak in to learn too.

[Soundbite] “Show me how you do it.”

[Soundbite] “You shouldn't hold it so sideways like that!”

The roles sometimes get switched in these practice sessions.

Today, three schools have gathered for practice.

[Soundbite] “Just wait and see us play!”

They have a bit of a way to go before they become professionals.

[Soundbite]Jo Jae-ho (Teacher): “They're not culturally privileged and they didn't have much time to practice. I'm proud of them.”

[Soundbite] “I want to become a violin teacher.”

[Soundbite] “I want to become the Beethoven of Korea.”

[Soundbite] “I want to become a good violinist.”

This program is helping give kids from the countryside new heights to reach for.
  • Pollack Return
    • 입력 2011-05-13 19:46:31
    News Today
[Anchor Lead]

Walleye pollack is being caught by the hundreds every days lately after having disappeared from waters off the east coast. The fish had rarely been seen over the past decade, and so it’s fetching high prices.

[Pkg]

Carts filled with walleye pollack are taken to an auction site. The fish were caught overnight in waters off Goseong County, Gangwon Province. They are mid-sized at 30-35 centimeters in length.

[Soundbite](Clerk, Federation of Fisheries Cooperatives): “Twenty three walleye pollack for 129,000 won ($119). It's number 72.”

The walleye pollack was thought to have disappeared but suddenly reappeared in nets in waters off the east coast from Sunday. The first day saw four fishing boats catching 162 of the fish and the next day saw 12 boats caught 360. The fish have been caught for the fifth day. Only one or two had been occasionally caught before. This is the first time in ten years to see catches amounting to hundreds of walleye pollack.

[Soundbite]Park Yeong-seon (Fisherman): “Some caught ten and others even caught 40 to 50.”

The auction price of a single walleye pollack is around five dollars 16 cents. This is three times more than the price of Russian imports of frozen walleye pollack.

[Soundbite]Park Jong-hwa (National Fisheries R&D Institute): “It’s below minus five degrees Celsius in waters 200 meters below sea level. So, walleye pollack can survive.”

Fishery authorities will keep close watch to see if the reappearance of walleye pollack is temporary or permanent.

2. Roh Exhibit

[Anchor Lead]

Two years have passed since the late former President Roh Moo-hyun passed away. A photography exhibition is being held to commemorate him. Let's take a look.

[Pkg]

While campaigning at a market place, the candidate, late Roh Moo-hyun sits down for Korean chess, Jangi. Here's a picture of Roh cheering for the national soccer team during the World Cup games with young Koreans. Though he was president, he puts on his shoes just like any other average Korean middle-aged men. The commemorative exhibition showcases 20 unpublicized photos of Roh's simple and humble life. It also features the bicycles he and his grand daughter rode together after his resignation.

[Soundbite]Moon Jae-in (Chair, Roh Moo-hyun Foundation): “You can see the dreams, challenges and tough times of politician Rho Moo-hyun.”

Former members of the Roh administration remembered his political faith and aim to make a world worth living for everyone. Various events commemorating Roh including exhibitions and cultural events are to be held through May 23rd nationwide including Roh's hometown Bongha and Gwangju.

[Soundbite] “We love you, President Roh Moo-hyun!”

3. Content Market

[Anchor Lead]

The Busan Contents Market, which is becoming the largest broadcast content fair in Asia, opened on Thursday. We take you there now.

[Pkg]

Foreign buyers are crowded at booths selling Korean television shows. The KBS drama 'Bread, Love and Dreams' which aired last year was sold to eleven countries at over three million dollars.

[Soundbite](Chinese Buyer): “Many Chinese love Korean dramas and 70% of dramas approved in China in the past two years have been KBS works.”

With the rising popularity of Korean programs, the Busan Contents Market plays an increasingly significant role. Even broadcasters from the Middle East are participating in this year's event, which is in its fifth year. Participation is also growing each year with 500 companies from 40 countries taking part. Since the Busan market is emerging as the hub of Asian visual content, the transaction volume has also surged.

[Soundbite]Koo Jong-sang (Chairman, Executive Committee): “Transactions are expected to jump from $31 million last year to $51 million this year.”

The market is a venue for not only sales but also for investment and production of TV contents.

[Soundbite]Geum Dong-su (President, KBS Media): “This year's market seeks to expand the Korean Wave through joint investment and productions.”

Different events such as smart media display and documentary screening are held on the sidelines of the fair which continues until tomorrow.

4. Warming Up

[Anchor Lead]

World-class athletes have posted season bests at the Daegu Pre-Championships Meeting in the country's third-largest city. The tournament is a prelude to the World Championships in Athletics that Daegu will host in August.

[Pkg]

The world's best in the women's 200 meters Allyson Felix speeds down the track. She narrows the distance with other runners on the straight section. Felix wins with the season's fastest time of 22.38 seconds, also a record for the Pre-Championships Meeting. She says she's acclimated to the Daegu track in preparation for the IAAF World Championships in August. She dominated the track and seeks her fourth straight world title, the first of which was won in the 2005 Helsinki tournament.

[Soundbite]Allyson Felix (U.S. Splinter)

The world No. 1 in the men's hurdles David Oliver has also joined the battle of the stars. He posts a season-best 13.14 seconds.

Korean pole vaulter Choi Yun-hee brings attention to the host country's athletes by setting a season high of 4.2 meters.

The stadium has been revamped with state-of-the-art tracks to be used in next year's London Summer Olympics. Precision recording devices have also ensured smooth tournament management. Daegu's successful hosting of the preliminary tournament has made the city confident of hosting the IAAF World Championships 107 days later.

5. Fighting Arthritis

[Anchor Lead]

Korean doctors have begun treating the early stages of arthritis using patients’ growth factor, a substance that stimulates cell growth. The new method has proven to be quite effective.

[Pkg]

This 50-something woman has undergone medical treatment because her knees hurt when she goes down a staircase. Her growth factor has been extracted from her blood and inserted into her joints. The growth factor restores the damaged cartilage in joints when inserted into damaged joints through arthroendoscopy. This in turn helps reduce inflammation and alleviate pain.

[Soundbite]Kim Yeong-sil (Early Arthritis Patient): “I'm glad that I can wear shoes now. I couldn't wear them because my knees hurt.”

The method has proved effective in treating the early stages of arthritis in middle-aged patients as well as injury.

[Soundbite]Koh Yong-gon (Director, Yonsei Sarang Hospital): “It can be used at the early and mid-stages of arthritis, when cartilage damage begins. For young patients, it can be used to treat ligament injuries caused by exercise.”

A study conducted by a hospital specializing in joints has shown that 80 percent of patients with early arthritis can be cured by inserting their growth factor into their joints. The effectiveness of this treatment method is especially high because the growth factor is inserted directly into the damaged cartilage through arthroendoscopy. The effect lasts for about a year, which is longer than that of medicine.

6. Digital Tradition

[Anchor Lead]

In traditional Korean medicine, a person's physical constitution is read through the facial features. Now, a device that measures the shape of the face has been approved by the Korea Food and Drug Administration. It's the first digital piece of equipment for traditional medicine to obtain approval.

[Pkg]

A three dimensional scanner scans a patient's face. The distance, angle and surface area in between facial features are automatically measured on the scanned images. Based on the measurements, the patient's physical constitution is diagnosed. A slim face and a big nose represent the constitution of "gallbladder." These people have a high level of body heat but not enough moist. On the other hand, a wide face and thick lips point to the "bladder" constitution. These people are low in stamina and high in moist.

[Soundbite]Prof. Kim Jong-won (Dong-eui University): “The gallbladder constitution needs medication to lower heat or replenish yin-blood. For the bladder constitution, we use drugs that help recharge energy and remove moisture.”

Oriental medicine has been criticized for relying too much on the doctors' subjective point of view. This system will help standardize the traditional medicine.

[Soundbite]Jeong Hui-gyo (Korea Food and Drug Administration): “There's been a lot of talk about developing Korean medicine based on science. It's the first time traditional medical skills has been computerize via clinical testing.”

The Korean medicine industry plans to support development of more medical equipment.

7. Car Trouble

[Anchor Lead]

More than 100-thousand foreign cars have been sold in Korea per year since the domestic market was opened to them 20 years ago. But problems like the high of repairs and costs, services have seen little progress.

[Pkg]

This consumer bought an imported car two months ago. The vehicle suddenly stopped while driving the first day and was rendered useless. The lack of replaceable parts delayed repair. Eventually, the entire transmission was replaced.

[Soundbite]Bang Man-seong (Consumer): “Who'd like to drive a new car that had to have its transmission replaced from the beginning?”

The service center says certain parts are no longer produced. This means no parts exist for car models on sale.

[Soundbite](Staff Member, Service Center (Voice Modified)): “We can't say for sure but the German headquarters said the parts aren't produced any more and advised to replacing the transmission.”

Imported cars accounted for just 1 percent of the domestic car market in 2002. But more than 90-thousand units were sold in Korea last year. The quality of service has not improved a bit and has even worsened in certain cases. BMW is known to have the most service centers in Korea with just 30. This means a one center has to handle an average of 2-thousand to 3-thousand cars. Expensive repair costs are another problem. The costs to replace parts for imported cars are nearly 5.5 times that of domestic cars and those for panel beating and painting are also far more expensive for foreign cars. The hourly labor cost for mechanics is also higher.

[Soundbite]Park Sang-yong (Consumer): “The center charged more than 2 million won (US$1,838) just for replacing a bumper. But I'm paying only 500 thousand won (US$460) here for fixing and reusing the old bumper.”

Mercedes Benz and BMW raked in a combined 919 million dollars last year in sales. Mercedes is known to send 90 percent of its profits to headquarters and BMW 62.5 percent.

8. One of the Gang

[Anchor Lead]

A high school teacher in Bonghwa County, North Gyeongsang Province is drawing the spotlight for wearing a school uniform just like his students. Let's go meet him.

[Pkg]

This math teacher is wearing a school uniform just like his students. He is also in charge of student guidance.

[Soundbite]Jeon Ji-hye (Student): “I was surprised and amazed to see our teacher wearing the same uniform as us. It gives me the feeling that he can understand us more.”

He began wearing the school uniform in March. He wears it all day at school. He says he wanted to get closer to the students.

[Soundbite]Lee Mu-yeong (Teacher): “I wanted to blend in among the students to draw out their potential and spontaneity. I think I have done that.”

Understanding the teacher's good will, the students are also changing; they keep the hallway clean and follow rules voluntarily without the teacher's
directions.

[Soundbite]Lee Dong-hun (Student): “Seeing our teacher try so hard, we wanted to return his love for us.”

The teacher's efforts have torn down the wall between teacher and student and has created a positive new campus culture.

9. Future Maestros

[Anchor Lead]

El Sistema is the Venezuelan national symphonic orchestra's program for children from underprivileged families. It was adopted in Korea this year. Thanks to the program, students from a small countryside school in South Gyeongsang Province are getting a chance to reach for new dreams. Let's get a closer look.

[Pkg]

Children from seventeen villages gather at a mountainside elementary school in Uiryeong County, South Gyeongsang Province. The school's total population is a mere 20 kids. The children suddenly break into cheers. It's because of these violins.

[Soundbite]Park Ji-yeon (Teacher): “We're happy too to see the kids so happy to get violins.”

Venezuela's national orchestra has a program for making children from poor neighborhoods into musicians. It’s called El Sistema, an educational revolution through music. The system has been adopted in Korea for young students in rural areas.

[Soundbite] “It's awesome! I like it.”

[Soundbite] “I'm going to practice hard!”

The kids are about to meet their violin teacher.

[Soundbite]Jeon Hyeon-so (Jinju Symphonic Orchestra): “Nice to meet you everyone. I’m Jeon Hyeon-so and I'm here to give you violin lessons starting today.”

This is the first time the kids have laid their hands on musical instruments. Now, they're getting lessons to point them in the right musical direction. Right after school gets out, Hae-jin hurries off to the greenhouse where her parents are working. She happily shows off her new violin. She plays the tune she’s just learned, a private recital for mom and dad.

[Soundbite]Sin Yun-mi (Parent): “It's so hard to find a place to get lessons. I'm thankful see to our daughter play.”

As Hae-jin carefully takes out her violin from its case at home, her little sisters rush in to get a closer look. She does her best to guard it from them so they can’t break it. Eventually, she falls asleep with the violin carefully laid beside her. The children gather to practice before class and after school. A couple of teachers quietly sneak in to learn too.

[Soundbite] “Show me how you do it.”

[Soundbite] “You shouldn't hold it so sideways like that!”

The roles sometimes get switched in these practice sessions.

Today, three schools have gathered for practice.

[Soundbite] “Just wait and see us play!”

They have a bit of a way to go before they become professionals.

[Soundbite]Jo Jae-ho (Teacher): “They're not culturally privileged and they didn't have much time to practice. I'm proud of them.”

[Soundbite] “I want to become a violin teacher.”

[Soundbite] “I want to become the Beethoven of Korea.”

[Soundbite] “I want to become a good violinist.”

This program is helping give kids from the countryside new heights to reach for.
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