기사 본문 영역

상세페이지

Final Stretch
입력 2011.05.18 (18:02) News Today
자동재생
동영상영역 시작
동영상영역 끝
[Anchor Lead]

Pyeongchang's final presentation for its bid to host the 2018 Winter Olympics is to take place in Lausanne, Switzerland on Wednesday. Figure skating superstar Kim Yu-na is among the dignitaries lined up to promote Korea's bid.

[Pkg]

This is the headquarters of the International Olympic Committee, where candidate cities will give their final presentations to host the 2018 Winter Olympics. They will be the first and last presentations given in front of all IOC members, who number around 100. Pyeongchang's presentation will be given by the bidding committee chairman Cho Yang-ho, Korean Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan and figure skating star Kim Yu-na. Kim Yu-na will stress Pyeongchang's master plan to provide the best environment for athletes, such as the close proximity of competition sites.

[Soundbite]Kim Yu-na (Figure Skater): “I was worried and felt a lot of pressure because I’m afraid of making a mistake. But I kept practicing and I feel well-prepared.”

Pyeongchang's third bid for the Winter Olympics pledges to show the world a new horizon in winter sports and comprehensive preparation including in stadiums, accommodation and transportation. The drive also has the full backing of the Korean people. Pyeongchang will also invest 500 million U.S. dollars to develop winter sports. Pyeongchang is competing for the bid against Munich and Annecy, France. The IOC will announce the host city of the 2018 Winter Olympics in July in South Africa.

2. Michelin Korea

[Anchor Lead]

The renowned Michelin Guide, a rating system of exceptional restaurants and tourist sites worldwide, has published its first Korea edition. It awarded its highest score to 23 Korean sites, which has raised hopes for a boost in tourism.

[Pkg]

An annual international guide book, the Michelin Guide, is sold in over fifty nations. Its first Korean edition has been published. The guide says that Korea has posted a 243 fold growth in national income in 38 years since the Korean War. It also describes Korea as the world's second heaviest drinker following Russia, and Korean dinner gatherings never fail to include the distilled liquor "soju." On Koreans' consumption of dog meat, the guide says it used to be a tradition of farmers in order to consume protein in summer. Korean public sauna called "Jjimjilbang" has also been introduced as a multi-function cultural complex with rooms of varying temperatures for relaxation. The guide also introduces 110 cultural and historical sites in Korea. Three-star sites include twenty-three places including the Gyeongbok and Changdeok palaces, the Hwaseong Fortress in Suwon and the Hahoi Folk Village in Andong. A three-star Michelin ranking is highly rare. 107 restaurants are also introduced ranging from famous Korean restaurants to local eateries.

[Soundbite]Bernard Delmas (Pres., Michelin Far East)

The 450-page Korean edition is based on survey results gathered by five French agents. The Korea edition is the fourth Michelin guide in Asia. It hit bookstores in Seoul and Paris simultaneously.

3. May 18 Uprising

[Anchor Lead]

Wednesday marks the 31st anniversary of the 1980 pro-democracy uprising in Gwangju. A documentary about activists who received little attention back then has highlighted their contributions to the country's democratization.

[Pkg]

The 1980 attack on people protesting martial law in Gwangju is considered a major tragedy in modern Korean history. Mothers gave rice balls to pro-democracy fighters who risked their lives.

[Soundbite] “We gave those because they were starving to death; we wanted them to carry on.”

High school girls were in charge of cooking at the main office of South Jeolla Province until the very last moment.

[Soundbite] “We all wrote notes in case we died. We wanted to say something to our parents before we died.”

Young people back then were determined to spread the truth amid tight censorship. Neighbors took care of the bodies of activists who were killed.

[Soundbite] “We identified them, informed the parents and sent them to the makeshift morgue. We did that until the very last day.”

A documentary titled "No Name Stars" is about the pro-democracy uprising and life in Korea at the time.

[Soundbite]Kim Tae-il (Director, "No Name Stars"): “Women played so many roles. Their stories are not frequently dealt with and remain in the shadows.”

The pro-democracy fighters did not confront government troops but wrote a new chapter in Korean history. Thirty-one years have passed since the incident, but the memory and legacy of the Gwangju uprising remain strong.

4. Tidal Experience

[Anchor Lead]

An ecology experience venue has opened at the Muan tidal flats in South Jeolla Province, which is the first coastal wetland in the country to be designated a protection zone. The natural education site is aimed at teaching kids the value of tidal flats.

[Pkg]

An ecological experience center has opened in the middle of a wide mud flat area. Children are looking inside the water tank with a model of the open sea and learn about the tidal flow.

[Soundbite] “What do you see after it (the water) goes out? (Tidal flats.) Right, tidal flats.”

They do tidal experiments and learn about the formation of tidal flats.

[Soundbite] “It looks so real and alive; it helps me understand it better.”

In an outdoor eco park, the children observe different wildlife such as crabs and salt plants. The Muan tidal flats in South Jeolla Province were the first coastal wetland in the country to be designated as protected areas in 2001.

[Soundbite]Park Jong-ju (Wetland Guide): “Unlike other places where you do activities like catching things, we allow limited visitors to come here for research and analysis.”

The flats will be used for educational and interactive purposes.

5. Urgent Service

[Anchor Lead]

Emergency rescue teams in Korea often get non-urgent requests, such as from people who have locked themselves out of their cars. But rescue staff will soon have the right to reject such calls to focus on more urgent situations.

[Pkg]

A cat is trapped at a ventilation hole in a restaurant. An emergency rescue team tries to rescue it but the cat won't budge.

Emergency workers also put bird nests back onto tree branches and sometimes catch iguanas that have been accidentally shipped with imported goods. They also climb ladders to open locked doors. But such non-urgent tasks are the duty of animal organizations or locksmiths.

[Soundbite]Jo Jeong-min (Sr. Firefighter, Jongno Fire Department): “It's frustrating and we waste a lot of precious time.”

More than 66-thousand emergency calls last year requested the rescue of animals or the opening of locked doors, accounting for 24 percent of all emergency calls. But new laws will allow the rejection of such non-urgent requests by emergency rescue workers.

[Soundbite]Kang Tae-seok (National Emergency Management Agency): “We’ll cut rescues for relatively less urgent situations short, so we can serve people in real emergency situations.”

Dangerous work like removing beehives, capturing wild hogs, or rescuing children locked inside alone will remain categorized as emergencies. But calls asking to drive a drunk person home or a ride to the hospital for a non-emergency can be rejected. The National Emergency Management Agency will review conditions for rejecting non-emergency calls and have the new laws take effect from September 9th.

6. Men at Home

[Anchor Lead]

In some Korean homes these days, the wife is the breadwinner and the husband is the homemaker. More men are also taking paternity leave, although the numbers remain tiny. The system needs improvement as many are still hesitant to break from tradition, worrying what others will think.

[Pkg]

O Seong-geun prepares breakfast for his wife and child. He sets the table, helps his daughter with her assignments and does laundry. He quit his job 13 years ago and has managed childcare and household chores instead of his working wife.

Yang Du-hui is on paternity leave. He cleans and dresses up the two children and does all the house chores.

[Soundbite]Yang Ga-on-sol (Son): “He takes me for a walk and we eat together. It's great.”

The number of men working as full-time homemakers has increased 70 percent for the past seven years. 819 men took paternity leave in 2010. This is a significant hike from only two in 2001 when the system was first introduced. But men still account for only 1.9 percent of total childcare leaves. Office worker Kim Jong-cheol chose to work from home. People give up taking leaves because they fear disadvantage in promotions or discontinuation of their career.

[Soundbite]Kim Jong-cheol (Home-based Worker): “After the break, I'll fall behind in terms of my work skills, information and social networks. I feel uneasy about it.”

Korea has yet to foster a social atmosphere that accepts men raising children as a norm.

7. Hero's Death

[Anchor Lead]

An elementary school is reeling from the death of its baseball coach. The coach sacrificed his life to save the lives of students and parents as a bus went out of control. The school's team has dedicated its championship trophy to the hero.

[Pkg]

An elementary school baseball team hardly looks happy despite winning the championship. Parents even burst into tears.

[Soundbite] “Coach!”

The team's coach Jeon In-taek had been killed in an accident on Teachers Day three days earlier. A bus sliding down a steep hill was about to hit students and parents. Jeon opened the bus door and tried to stop the bus. The vehicle eventually crashed into the school fence wall, killing him.

[Soundbite](Witness): “He tried to stop it as hard as he could. Two parents, students and kids were coming up this way.”

The coach chose to give his life to save others in just ten seconds. He was known for his great passion for baseball and caring about students.

[Soundbite]Jang Gi-gap (Principal, Younhyun Elementary School): “He loved his students very much. He was a very strong leader; students followed what he said.”

The team's victory is the school's final gift to the late coach.

8. Host Cop

[Anchor Lead]

Song Hae, the host of one of Korea's longest-running TV shows, KBS’s “Nationwide Singing Contest”, has become a police chief for a day. He patrolled the Jongno Area, including the slate house district and Tapgol Park, meeting the locals.

[Pkg]

[Soundbite] “This is the Nationwide Singing Contest!”

Song Hae has been hosting a well-known TV show called the Nationwide Singing Contest for nearly three decades. He's become a one-day chief of the Jongjo police station.

[Soundbite] “I'm song-hae! The host of the Nationwide Singing Contest!”

Song is now 84 years old. He has lived in Jongno for thirty years since leaving his hometown in Hwanghae Province in North Korea. So Jongno is like his secondary hometown. He makes people on the street smile with his signature sense of humor.

[Soundbite] “Is everything okay? (No.) All right then, I'll come back later with a bunch of my friends.”

He makes friends with seniors resting at the Tapgol Park. He visits homes of the under-priviledged to encourage the neighbors. People who've met him say they feel re-energized.

[Soundbite]Lee Yeong-ja (Merchant): “He's healthy. He's old but he's energetic like a young man and very comforting.”

After spending a day as the police chief, Song advised the police to try to be more understanding to the public.

9. Special Hotels

[Anchor Lead]

When planning a trip, where you stay when you get there is just as important as where you’re going. Today, we're going to show you some extra special places to stay for the night.

[Pkg]

A picturesque building stands on a hill beside the sea. It was built by an artist couple. The entire hotel is like an art museum. The hotel boasts picturesque views of the sea. Crowds of people swarm in to get a look at the famous hotel. The garden is full of small surprises. Visitors enjoy themselves looking for pieces of art work hidden amid the woods.

[Soundbite] “The air is clean thanks to the trees and the artworks make the place better.”

There are lots of things to see.

[Soundbite] “These are all made of cow droppings!”

[Soundbite] “I used to rake and clean up cow droppings when I was little. It's amazing to see artworks made with it.”

And don't forget to look below your feet. This giant duck at the sculpture park is made of tokens left behind by visitors.

[Soundbite] “We carved our names and hung it here hoping for our relationship to last forever and to make memories.”

Now it’s time to explore a tunnel that’s an art piece in itself.

[Soundbite] “It's amazing, wonderful and fantastic!”

This hotel is especially appealing to children.

[Soundbite] “There’s Thomas!”

It’s decked out with children's favorite characters. The hotel rarely has an unsatisfied child customer.

[Soundbite] “I’m Mickey!”

[Soundbite] “I’m Spiderman!”

[Soundbite] “I'm Cinderella!”

Costumes of favorite characters are available for the young visitors. Dad helps this little guy get into the spirit of Spiderman.

[Soundbite] “I came with the kids and we're all having a fun time.”

And there’s a mini golf course right outside. Not everyone feels the need to follow official golfing rules here. There’s also an amusement park train.

[Soundbite] “The train ride is fun!”

Visitors can also try out lots of different activities related to porcelain, which is a local specialty of Icheon. You can try spinning the wheel or paint your own piece.

[Soundbite] “I think it’s educational to let kids make something useful with clay.”

Next up is a place for people who like to take pictures. The hotel room is decorated with a four seasons theme. Even before unpacking, the guests get busy taking pictures.

[Soundbite] “Peek-a-boo!”

It's set up like a photo studio.

[Soundbite] “I was surprised as the hotel is so beautiful. I love it as we can take pictures of our babies and sleep as well.”

[Soundbite] “The dresses are a special service.”

On a trip to this place, most of the photos get shot right in your room.

[Soundbite] “Pose beautifully!”

The hotel owner is an experienced photographer himself.

[Soundbite] “It's like taking wedding pictures.”

With the number of photos guests take here, they’re not likely to soon forget their visit.

[Soundbite] “We just came to stay for a night. I'm surprised and happy to be able to take pictures wearing a dress.”

Checking into one of these places makes the hotel just as much a part of the trip as the place you’re visiting.
  • Final Stretch
    • 입력 2011-05-18 18:02:31
    News Today
[Anchor Lead]

Pyeongchang's final presentation for its bid to host the 2018 Winter Olympics is to take place in Lausanne, Switzerland on Wednesday. Figure skating superstar Kim Yu-na is among the dignitaries lined up to promote Korea's bid.

[Pkg]

This is the headquarters of the International Olympic Committee, where candidate cities will give their final presentations to host the 2018 Winter Olympics. They will be the first and last presentations given in front of all IOC members, who number around 100. Pyeongchang's presentation will be given by the bidding committee chairman Cho Yang-ho, Korean Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan and figure skating star Kim Yu-na. Kim Yu-na will stress Pyeongchang's master plan to provide the best environment for athletes, such as the close proximity of competition sites.

[Soundbite]Kim Yu-na (Figure Skater): “I was worried and felt a lot of pressure because I’m afraid of making a mistake. But I kept practicing and I feel well-prepared.”

Pyeongchang's third bid for the Winter Olympics pledges to show the world a new horizon in winter sports and comprehensive preparation including in stadiums, accommodation and transportation. The drive also has the full backing of the Korean people. Pyeongchang will also invest 500 million U.S. dollars to develop winter sports. Pyeongchang is competing for the bid against Munich and Annecy, France. The IOC will announce the host city of the 2018 Winter Olympics in July in South Africa.

2. Michelin Korea

[Anchor Lead]

The renowned Michelin Guide, a rating system of exceptional restaurants and tourist sites worldwide, has published its first Korea edition. It awarded its highest score to 23 Korean sites, which has raised hopes for a boost in tourism.

[Pkg]

An annual international guide book, the Michelin Guide, is sold in over fifty nations. Its first Korean edition has been published. The guide says that Korea has posted a 243 fold growth in national income in 38 years since the Korean War. It also describes Korea as the world's second heaviest drinker following Russia, and Korean dinner gatherings never fail to include the distilled liquor "soju." On Koreans' consumption of dog meat, the guide says it used to be a tradition of farmers in order to consume protein in summer. Korean public sauna called "Jjimjilbang" has also been introduced as a multi-function cultural complex with rooms of varying temperatures for relaxation. The guide also introduces 110 cultural and historical sites in Korea. Three-star sites include twenty-three places including the Gyeongbok and Changdeok palaces, the Hwaseong Fortress in Suwon and the Hahoi Folk Village in Andong. A three-star Michelin ranking is highly rare. 107 restaurants are also introduced ranging from famous Korean restaurants to local eateries.

[Soundbite]Bernard Delmas (Pres., Michelin Far East)

The 450-page Korean edition is based on survey results gathered by five French agents. The Korea edition is the fourth Michelin guide in Asia. It hit bookstores in Seoul and Paris simultaneously.

3. May 18 Uprising

[Anchor Lead]

Wednesday marks the 31st anniversary of the 1980 pro-democracy uprising in Gwangju. A documentary about activists who received little attention back then has highlighted their contributions to the country's democratization.

[Pkg]

The 1980 attack on people protesting martial law in Gwangju is considered a major tragedy in modern Korean history. Mothers gave rice balls to pro-democracy fighters who risked their lives.

[Soundbite] “We gave those because they were starving to death; we wanted them to carry on.”

High school girls were in charge of cooking at the main office of South Jeolla Province until the very last moment.

[Soundbite] “We all wrote notes in case we died. We wanted to say something to our parents before we died.”

Young people back then were determined to spread the truth amid tight censorship. Neighbors took care of the bodies of activists who were killed.

[Soundbite] “We identified them, informed the parents and sent them to the makeshift morgue. We did that until the very last day.”

A documentary titled "No Name Stars" is about the pro-democracy uprising and life in Korea at the time.

[Soundbite]Kim Tae-il (Director, "No Name Stars"): “Women played so many roles. Their stories are not frequently dealt with and remain in the shadows.”

The pro-democracy fighters did not confront government troops but wrote a new chapter in Korean history. Thirty-one years have passed since the incident, but the memory and legacy of the Gwangju uprising remain strong.

4. Tidal Experience

[Anchor Lead]

An ecology experience venue has opened at the Muan tidal flats in South Jeolla Province, which is the first coastal wetland in the country to be designated a protection zone. The natural education site is aimed at teaching kids the value of tidal flats.

[Pkg]

An ecological experience center has opened in the middle of a wide mud flat area. Children are looking inside the water tank with a model of the open sea and learn about the tidal flow.

[Soundbite] “What do you see after it (the water) goes out? (Tidal flats.) Right, tidal flats.”

They do tidal experiments and learn about the formation of tidal flats.

[Soundbite] “It looks so real and alive; it helps me understand it better.”

In an outdoor eco park, the children observe different wildlife such as crabs and salt plants. The Muan tidal flats in South Jeolla Province were the first coastal wetland in the country to be designated as protected areas in 2001.

[Soundbite]Park Jong-ju (Wetland Guide): “Unlike other places where you do activities like catching things, we allow limited visitors to come here for research and analysis.”

The flats will be used for educational and interactive purposes.

5. Urgent Service

[Anchor Lead]

Emergency rescue teams in Korea often get non-urgent requests, such as from people who have locked themselves out of their cars. But rescue staff will soon have the right to reject such calls to focus on more urgent situations.

[Pkg]

A cat is trapped at a ventilation hole in a restaurant. An emergency rescue team tries to rescue it but the cat won't budge.

Emergency workers also put bird nests back onto tree branches and sometimes catch iguanas that have been accidentally shipped with imported goods. They also climb ladders to open locked doors. But such non-urgent tasks are the duty of animal organizations or locksmiths.

[Soundbite]Jo Jeong-min (Sr. Firefighter, Jongno Fire Department): “It's frustrating and we waste a lot of precious time.”

More than 66-thousand emergency calls last year requested the rescue of animals or the opening of locked doors, accounting for 24 percent of all emergency calls. But new laws will allow the rejection of such non-urgent requests by emergency rescue workers.

[Soundbite]Kang Tae-seok (National Emergency Management Agency): “We’ll cut rescues for relatively less urgent situations short, so we can serve people in real emergency situations.”

Dangerous work like removing beehives, capturing wild hogs, or rescuing children locked inside alone will remain categorized as emergencies. But calls asking to drive a drunk person home or a ride to the hospital for a non-emergency can be rejected. The National Emergency Management Agency will review conditions for rejecting non-emergency calls and have the new laws take effect from September 9th.

6. Men at Home

[Anchor Lead]

In some Korean homes these days, the wife is the breadwinner and the husband is the homemaker. More men are also taking paternity leave, although the numbers remain tiny. The system needs improvement as many are still hesitant to break from tradition, worrying what others will think.

[Pkg]

O Seong-geun prepares breakfast for his wife and child. He sets the table, helps his daughter with her assignments and does laundry. He quit his job 13 years ago and has managed childcare and household chores instead of his working wife.

Yang Du-hui is on paternity leave. He cleans and dresses up the two children and does all the house chores.

[Soundbite]Yang Ga-on-sol (Son): “He takes me for a walk and we eat together. It's great.”

The number of men working as full-time homemakers has increased 70 percent for the past seven years. 819 men took paternity leave in 2010. This is a significant hike from only two in 2001 when the system was first introduced. But men still account for only 1.9 percent of total childcare leaves. Office worker Kim Jong-cheol chose to work from home. People give up taking leaves because they fear disadvantage in promotions or discontinuation of their career.

[Soundbite]Kim Jong-cheol (Home-based Worker): “After the break, I'll fall behind in terms of my work skills, information and social networks. I feel uneasy about it.”

Korea has yet to foster a social atmosphere that accepts men raising children as a norm.

7. Hero's Death

[Anchor Lead]

An elementary school is reeling from the death of its baseball coach. The coach sacrificed his life to save the lives of students and parents as a bus went out of control. The school's team has dedicated its championship trophy to the hero.

[Pkg]

An elementary school baseball team hardly looks happy despite winning the championship. Parents even burst into tears.

[Soundbite] “Coach!”

The team's coach Jeon In-taek had been killed in an accident on Teachers Day three days earlier. A bus sliding down a steep hill was about to hit students and parents. Jeon opened the bus door and tried to stop the bus. The vehicle eventually crashed into the school fence wall, killing him.

[Soundbite](Witness): “He tried to stop it as hard as he could. Two parents, students and kids were coming up this way.”

The coach chose to give his life to save others in just ten seconds. He was known for his great passion for baseball and caring about students.

[Soundbite]Jang Gi-gap (Principal, Younhyun Elementary School): “He loved his students very much. He was a very strong leader; students followed what he said.”

The team's victory is the school's final gift to the late coach.

8. Host Cop

[Anchor Lead]

Song Hae, the host of one of Korea's longest-running TV shows, KBS’s “Nationwide Singing Contest”, has become a police chief for a day. He patrolled the Jongno Area, including the slate house district and Tapgol Park, meeting the locals.

[Pkg]

[Soundbite] “This is the Nationwide Singing Contest!”

Song Hae has been hosting a well-known TV show called the Nationwide Singing Contest for nearly three decades. He's become a one-day chief of the Jongjo police station.

[Soundbite] “I'm song-hae! The host of the Nationwide Singing Contest!”

Song is now 84 years old. He has lived in Jongno for thirty years since leaving his hometown in Hwanghae Province in North Korea. So Jongno is like his secondary hometown. He makes people on the street smile with his signature sense of humor.

[Soundbite] “Is everything okay? (No.) All right then, I'll come back later with a bunch of my friends.”

He makes friends with seniors resting at the Tapgol Park. He visits homes of the under-priviledged to encourage the neighbors. People who've met him say they feel re-energized.

[Soundbite]Lee Yeong-ja (Merchant): “He's healthy. He's old but he's energetic like a young man and very comforting.”

After spending a day as the police chief, Song advised the police to try to be more understanding to the public.

9. Special Hotels

[Anchor Lead]

When planning a trip, where you stay when you get there is just as important as where you’re going. Today, we're going to show you some extra special places to stay for the night.

[Pkg]

A picturesque building stands on a hill beside the sea. It was built by an artist couple. The entire hotel is like an art museum. The hotel boasts picturesque views of the sea. Crowds of people swarm in to get a look at the famous hotel. The garden is full of small surprises. Visitors enjoy themselves looking for pieces of art work hidden amid the woods.

[Soundbite] “The air is clean thanks to the trees and the artworks make the place better.”

There are lots of things to see.

[Soundbite] “These are all made of cow droppings!”

[Soundbite] “I used to rake and clean up cow droppings when I was little. It's amazing to see artworks made with it.”

And don't forget to look below your feet. This giant duck at the sculpture park is made of tokens left behind by visitors.

[Soundbite] “We carved our names and hung it here hoping for our relationship to last forever and to make memories.”

Now it’s time to explore a tunnel that’s an art piece in itself.

[Soundbite] “It's amazing, wonderful and fantastic!”

This hotel is especially appealing to children.

[Soundbite] “There’s Thomas!”

It’s decked out with children's favorite characters. The hotel rarely has an unsatisfied child customer.

[Soundbite] “I’m Mickey!”

[Soundbite] “I’m Spiderman!”

[Soundbite] “I'm Cinderella!”

Costumes of favorite characters are available for the young visitors. Dad helps this little guy get into the spirit of Spiderman.

[Soundbite] “I came with the kids and we're all having a fun time.”

And there’s a mini golf course right outside. Not everyone feels the need to follow official golfing rules here. There’s also an amusement park train.

[Soundbite] “The train ride is fun!”

Visitors can also try out lots of different activities related to porcelain, which is a local specialty of Icheon. You can try spinning the wheel or paint your own piece.

[Soundbite] “I think it’s educational to let kids make something useful with clay.”

Next up is a place for people who like to take pictures. The hotel room is decorated with a four seasons theme. Even before unpacking, the guests get busy taking pictures.

[Soundbite] “Peek-a-boo!”

It's set up like a photo studio.

[Soundbite] “I was surprised as the hotel is so beautiful. I love it as we can take pictures of our babies and sleep as well.”

[Soundbite] “The dresses are a special service.”

On a trip to this place, most of the photos get shot right in your room.

[Soundbite] “Pose beautifully!”

The hotel owner is an experienced photographer himself.

[Soundbite] “It's like taking wedding pictures.”

With the number of photos guests take here, they’re not likely to soon forget their visit.

[Soundbite] “We just came to stay for a night. I'm surprised and happy to be able to take pictures wearing a dress.”

Checking into one of these places makes the hotel just as much a part of the trip as the place you’re visiting.
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