기사 본문 영역

상세페이지

Memorial Event
입력 2011.05.23 (17:51) News Today
자동재생
동영상영역 시작
동영상영역 끝
[Anchor Lead]

On the second anniversary of former President Roh Moo-hyun's death, people are visiting his hometown of Bongha Village in Gimhae, South Gyeongsang Province, to pay their respects. The official memorial ceremony was held this afternoon, and was attended by Roh’s family and members of his administration.

[Pkg]

A stage has been placed next to former president Roh Moo-hyun's burial site. The audience sing together remembering the late president. Artists of South Gyeongsang Province have prepared the event to commemorate the second anniversary of Roh's death. The event is named "Back to a liveable world for everyone" to convey his dream. Former Prime Minister Han Myeong-suk and South Chungcheong Provincial governor Ahn Hee-jeong attended the event. Various events were held including traditional percussion and band performances. Around 50,000 people visited Bongha Village to commemorate the late former president. Participants enjoyed the commemorative exhibition and the bust of Roh.

[Soundbite] “I’ve wanted to visit here for a long time and finally came. The empty place he left seems so big; it breaks my heart.”

The ceremony commemorating the second anniversary of Roh's death was held next to his grave site in Bongha Village Monday afternoon. Among those attending were Roh's family including wife Gwon Yang-suk and son Geon-ho, leaders of political parties and members of the former Roh administrations. A film commemorating Roh was screened and visitors paid respect to the late former president.

2. Agent Orange

[Anchor Lead]

Korea and the U.S. have agreed to jointly investigate the alleged burial of the defoliant Agent Orange in Chilgok County, North Gyeongsang Province by American forces stationed here. Civic groups as well as government officials will take part in the study.

[Pkg]

The U.S. Army base Camp Carroll in Chilgok County, North Gyeongsang Province, is where American troops allegedly buried large amounts of a defoliant. Fears are growing among Chilgok residents because the number of Vietnam War victims in Korea suffering from the side effects of defoliants is an estimated 120-thousand.

[Soundbite] “We're worried about food safety; even residence stability is now in question.”

Seoul and Washington have agreed to jointly investigate the allegation. The measure is unprecedentedly swift given that American military camps never allowed trespassing under the Status of Forces Agreement. The U.S. will also submit to Korea documents on the camp's environmental situation. A private investigative team comprising officials from the Environment Ministry and North Gyeongsang Province as well as representatives and environmental activists from the area will survey Camp Carroll from Monday. Separately a probe into dioxin pollution has begun amid yet another allegation that underground water in Chilgok County has been polluted.

3. Pirate Trial

[Anchor Lead]

The trial of four of the five Somali pirates arrested on charges of hijacking the Korean freighter "Samho Jewelry" and shooting its captain begins today in Korea. The trial is the first of its kind here.

[Pkg]

The trial of Somali pirates began when the pirates arrived at the Busan District Court. Twelve jurors have been chosen behind closed doors starting from 9:30 a.m. for the jury trial of somali pirates. The trial officially opened at 11 a.m. local time. The pirates are accused of armed robbery against ships and attempted murder. The trial dealt with four out of the five pirates who were arrested and brought to Korea. One out of the five refused jury trial.

[Soundbite]Jeon Ji-hwan (Spokesperson, Busan District Court): “We can't translate Korean into Somali; we have to translate Korean into English and then into Somali.”

The unprecedented trial will run for five days. The jury will hold a closed session to discuss the proper levels of punishment against the pirates on Friday. The bench will deliver a sentence based on the recommended punishment by the jury. The court has decided to give out admission tickets to citizens and journalists. A screening device will be installed in front of the courtroom to prevent any potential terrorist attack.

4. Fake Liquor

[Anchor Lead]

Criminals are making fake liquor in the country and selling it as expensive imported brands. Here's a look at techniques to see if liquor bottles are authentic or fake.

[Pkg]

A large volume of fake liquor made by mixing in colors has been caught. Fake liquor makers target liquor lovers, causing consumer jitters. Sales of fake liquor on the domestic market scale have reached an estimated 9 million U.S. dollars. So liquor producers are focusing on preventing fabrication.

The blue button goes down on this authentic liquor bottle when opened. A gap forms between the bottleneck and the top and fails to return to its original position.

[Soundbite]Kim Seung-beom (Staff Member, Liquor Company): “If any of the three parts are not in the right position, you can assume the bottle has been opened.”

This device to prevent the cap from being turned the opposite way allows the mark "genuine" to appear just once when the bottle is first opened. A smartphone app can help verify and view records of a liquor product by scanning the chip on the bottle.

[Soundbite]Kang Jin-u (Staff Member, Liquor Company): “The chips contain unique data; such RFID chips can’t be copied.”

But the best way to verify the authenticity of a liquor product is checking authentication and the consumer directly opening a bottle.

5. Tiger Lizards

[Anchor Lead]

Endangered Korean tiger lizards live in sand hills in southern and western coastal regions of Korea. Their numbers have been declining as more sand dunes disappear due to urbanization and development projects. Desperate efforts are being made to protect the animal.

[Pkg]

Early in the morning, a lizard comes out from sand on a beach. It comes out of sand and basks in the sun. The animal is called Korean tiger lizard because of leopard patterns on its back. It is one of animals on the verge of extinction.

[Soundbite]Song Jae-yeong (Korea National Park Research Inst.): “The habitat has been considerably destroyed. The animal used to be found nationwide. But the lizard is now spotted only in few areas.”

It swiftly catches a young mantis. The size of the Korean tiger lizard is no greater than 10 centimeters long. But it preys on insects and spiders. It lays three to four eggs at a time in a place 20-centimeters deep below sand in July and August. A problem is that its egg-laying period coincides with summer vacation season in Korea. Another problem is the disappearing sand dunes, which are their major habitat. The class-two endangered species Korean tiger lizards will go extinct if sand dunes continue to disappear because of the reckless development of coastal areas.

6. Mine Festival

[Anchor Lead]

The Chuncheon International Mime Festival is one of the three biggest events of its kind in the world. The Culture, Sports & Tourism Ministry has designated the event a leading festival for the fifth straight year.

[Pkg]

A mass water fight begins with the beating of drums. Things that can carry water like water guns and pails are used. The opening nanjang "Ah! Surajang" represents Chuncheon, and the so-called city of water heralds the launch of the mime festival.

[Soundbite] “There aren't many chances to have water fights like this in the city. I like it and it was a special experience.”

A performance is held some 10 meters up in the air on a tower crane. Other performances use all kinds of props.

[Soundbite] “We came to show our girls mime shows and let them experience a festival where you blend in with other people.”

The 23rd annual Chuncheon International Mime Festival features more than a 100 world-class teams from 12 countries including Korea, France and Australia.

[Soundbite]Yoo Jin-gyu (Art Director): “We'd like to expand and maximize such nanjangs to develop a new culture.”

The mime festival runs through Sunday.

7. School Gardens

[Anchor Lead]

Backyard gardening at school is growing popular among elementary school students. Children learn about the importance of nature while tending to the vegetables.

[Pkg]

A garden at an elementary school's backyard is crowded with children. Lettuce and pepper are being grown there. Students water the vegetables and remove weeds. They say they get great pleasure in observing and recording the growth of vegetables.

[Soundbite]Kim Geon-u (Elementary School Student): “The peppers were small. But now they’re big enough to eat.”

The organic vegetables are popular among students at lunchtime.

[Soundbite]Kim Dong-gyun (Elementary School Student): “I think the vegetables taste better because we grow them by ourselves. We eat more vegetables.”

Five schools in Seoul have backyard gardens. School gardens have good educational effects for students, such as recognizing the benefits of raising organic agricultural products. The Seoul Metropolitan Office of Education is accordingly encouraging more schools to operate backyard gardens.

[Soundbite]Park Hye-ja (Principal, Nokcheon Elementary School): “Students can understand farmers and will eventually appreciate their hard work.”

Schoolyard gardens offer children the opportunity to learn from nature.

8. Seoul Photos

[Anchor Lead]

A photo exhibition is on to show what Seoul looks like through the eyes of visitors to the city. Let's have a look.

[Pkg]

Every year, Seoul greets seven million and 500 thousand foreign tourists and 260,000 foreigners living in Seoul. Photos of Seoul taken by tourists have been displayed. Seoul is a city where the fading traditions are still respected. The people of Seoul do not mind waiting in a long line to buy hot steaming Korean dumplings called mandu at the marketplace. People spend time together over a glass of drink. Three generations, the grandmother, mother and daughter-in-law, work together making kimchi, while aged men play Korean chess called janggi with friends. People pray for good fortune offering liquor and money to the pig head. Tables are filled with a large, generous meal.

[Soundbite]Daniel Hewitt (1st Prize Winner)

Subway stations are crowded with people getting on and off the train. And the streets are filled with endless lines of cars. At night, the city is lit with bright, glamorous lights.

[Soundbite]Kim Ji-eun (Visitor): “The traditional and humble aspects seem to be interesting to foreigners. All such aspects can be seen here.”

The 40 photos of Seoul taken by foreigners will be shown until Thursday.

9. Smart Shoppers

[Anchor Lead]

There are places where you can get big discounts on certain days of the week. Let's get a closer look.

[Pkg]

This home appliance and furniture store has a swarm of customers every Sunday.

[Soundbite] “I took Sunday off to come here. I have to win!”

[Soundbite] “I came to get something for my home.”

Customers bid for things they want and if they win, they get what they've bid for just 1,000 won, or a bit less than a U.S. dollar.

[Soundbite] “Now let's start the draw!”

[Soundbite] “I won!”

Those who didn't win anything play rock, paper, scissors and the winner can buy appliances or furniture for a fourth of the original price.

[Soundbite] “Wow! This is mine!”

[Soundbite] “This is mine!”

If you’re shopping at these prices, you probably won’t want to shell out for delivery.

[Soundbite] “We knew we would win today so we brought a truck. I'm so happy to take it home with me.”

These people really know how to save.

This store sells furniture that has been displayed in model houses at half of the original price.

[Soundbite] “This furniture originally cost 1,160,000 won (US$1,072). But there's not even a scratch on it.”

This sofa originally cost around 1,500 dollars, but it’s half off. And this bed is more than 50 percent off.

[Soundbite] “I missed a good chance! This one's prettier. I should have come earlier.”

But there’s no need to worry too much, because more furniture comes in every week.

[Soundbite] “I come on weekdays to buy small home appliances. And I come to try out the bidding for bigger ones and buy at the original price if I don't win.”

This store holds discount sales for sheets and blankets every Saturday.

[Soundbite] “I like it! It's comfortable and soft.”

There are discounts of more than 70 percent. Products that originally cost about 150 dollars go for less than 30 and 90-dollar-items now cost under 19. Even though they're cheap, the quality is still good. This goose-down blanket, for example, is cool in the summer and warm in the winter. There’s a reason they can sell things so cheaply.

[Soundbite] “We have our own production plant so we can offer big discounts as we produce and sell directly to consumers.”

The big bundle cost less than 64 dollars.

[Soundbite] “I'm happy to buy three for the price of one. I love Saturdays!”

Now, it’s time for a massage. This is a traditional Thai massage center.

[Soundbite] “I came to relax. I'm so exhausted.”

[Soundbite] “It's too good a chance to miss!”

You can get a massage for half price on Mondays. Customers seem happy they came.

[Soundbite] “It's relaxing!”

[Soundbite] “It's relieving! I love it!”

[Soundbite] “I feel like a queen!”

You also get a hot foot bath and a cup of herbal tea as a bonus. It’s a great way to start off the week.

[Soundbite] “Getting a massage from head to foot and a nice cup of tea makes you feel like a V.I.P at 40,000 won (US$37).”

[Soundbite] “Monday is massage day! We love Monday!”

These great deals are definitely worth watching out for, so keep an eye on your calendar.
  • Memorial Event
    • 입력 2011-05-23 17:51:54
    News Today
[Anchor Lead]

On the second anniversary of former President Roh Moo-hyun's death, people are visiting his hometown of Bongha Village in Gimhae, South Gyeongsang Province, to pay their respects. The official memorial ceremony was held this afternoon, and was attended by Roh’s family and members of his administration.

[Pkg]

A stage has been placed next to former president Roh Moo-hyun's burial site. The audience sing together remembering the late president. Artists of South Gyeongsang Province have prepared the event to commemorate the second anniversary of Roh's death. The event is named "Back to a liveable world for everyone" to convey his dream. Former Prime Minister Han Myeong-suk and South Chungcheong Provincial governor Ahn Hee-jeong attended the event. Various events were held including traditional percussion and band performances. Around 50,000 people visited Bongha Village to commemorate the late former president. Participants enjoyed the commemorative exhibition and the bust of Roh.

[Soundbite] “I’ve wanted to visit here for a long time and finally came. The empty place he left seems so big; it breaks my heart.”

The ceremony commemorating the second anniversary of Roh's death was held next to his grave site in Bongha Village Monday afternoon. Among those attending were Roh's family including wife Gwon Yang-suk and son Geon-ho, leaders of political parties and members of the former Roh administrations. A film commemorating Roh was screened and visitors paid respect to the late former president.

2. Agent Orange

[Anchor Lead]

Korea and the U.S. have agreed to jointly investigate the alleged burial of the defoliant Agent Orange in Chilgok County, North Gyeongsang Province by American forces stationed here. Civic groups as well as government officials will take part in the study.

[Pkg]

The U.S. Army base Camp Carroll in Chilgok County, North Gyeongsang Province, is where American troops allegedly buried large amounts of a defoliant. Fears are growing among Chilgok residents because the number of Vietnam War victims in Korea suffering from the side effects of defoliants is an estimated 120-thousand.

[Soundbite] “We're worried about food safety; even residence stability is now in question.”

Seoul and Washington have agreed to jointly investigate the allegation. The measure is unprecedentedly swift given that American military camps never allowed trespassing under the Status of Forces Agreement. The U.S. will also submit to Korea documents on the camp's environmental situation. A private investigative team comprising officials from the Environment Ministry and North Gyeongsang Province as well as representatives and environmental activists from the area will survey Camp Carroll from Monday. Separately a probe into dioxin pollution has begun amid yet another allegation that underground water in Chilgok County has been polluted.

3. Pirate Trial

[Anchor Lead]

The trial of four of the five Somali pirates arrested on charges of hijacking the Korean freighter "Samho Jewelry" and shooting its captain begins today in Korea. The trial is the first of its kind here.

[Pkg]

The trial of Somali pirates began when the pirates arrived at the Busan District Court. Twelve jurors have been chosen behind closed doors starting from 9:30 a.m. for the jury trial of somali pirates. The trial officially opened at 11 a.m. local time. The pirates are accused of armed robbery against ships and attempted murder. The trial dealt with four out of the five pirates who were arrested and brought to Korea. One out of the five refused jury trial.

[Soundbite]Jeon Ji-hwan (Spokesperson, Busan District Court): “We can't translate Korean into Somali; we have to translate Korean into English and then into Somali.”

The unprecedented trial will run for five days. The jury will hold a closed session to discuss the proper levels of punishment against the pirates on Friday. The bench will deliver a sentence based on the recommended punishment by the jury. The court has decided to give out admission tickets to citizens and journalists. A screening device will be installed in front of the courtroom to prevent any potential terrorist attack.

4. Fake Liquor

[Anchor Lead]

Criminals are making fake liquor in the country and selling it as expensive imported brands. Here's a look at techniques to see if liquor bottles are authentic or fake.

[Pkg]

A large volume of fake liquor made by mixing in colors has been caught. Fake liquor makers target liquor lovers, causing consumer jitters. Sales of fake liquor on the domestic market scale have reached an estimated 9 million U.S. dollars. So liquor producers are focusing on preventing fabrication.

The blue button goes down on this authentic liquor bottle when opened. A gap forms between the bottleneck and the top and fails to return to its original position.

[Soundbite]Kim Seung-beom (Staff Member, Liquor Company): “If any of the three parts are not in the right position, you can assume the bottle has been opened.”

This device to prevent the cap from being turned the opposite way allows the mark "genuine" to appear just once when the bottle is first opened. A smartphone app can help verify and view records of a liquor product by scanning the chip on the bottle.

[Soundbite]Kang Jin-u (Staff Member, Liquor Company): “The chips contain unique data; such RFID chips can’t be copied.”

But the best way to verify the authenticity of a liquor product is checking authentication and the consumer directly opening a bottle.

5. Tiger Lizards

[Anchor Lead]

Endangered Korean tiger lizards live in sand hills in southern and western coastal regions of Korea. Their numbers have been declining as more sand dunes disappear due to urbanization and development projects. Desperate efforts are being made to protect the animal.

[Pkg]

Early in the morning, a lizard comes out from sand on a beach. It comes out of sand and basks in the sun. The animal is called Korean tiger lizard because of leopard patterns on its back. It is one of animals on the verge of extinction.

[Soundbite]Song Jae-yeong (Korea National Park Research Inst.): “The habitat has been considerably destroyed. The animal used to be found nationwide. But the lizard is now spotted only in few areas.”

It swiftly catches a young mantis. The size of the Korean tiger lizard is no greater than 10 centimeters long. But it preys on insects and spiders. It lays three to four eggs at a time in a place 20-centimeters deep below sand in July and August. A problem is that its egg-laying period coincides with summer vacation season in Korea. Another problem is the disappearing sand dunes, which are their major habitat. The class-two endangered species Korean tiger lizards will go extinct if sand dunes continue to disappear because of the reckless development of coastal areas.

6. Mine Festival

[Anchor Lead]

The Chuncheon International Mime Festival is one of the three biggest events of its kind in the world. The Culture, Sports & Tourism Ministry has designated the event a leading festival for the fifth straight year.

[Pkg]

A mass water fight begins with the beating of drums. Things that can carry water like water guns and pails are used. The opening nanjang "Ah! Surajang" represents Chuncheon, and the so-called city of water heralds the launch of the mime festival.

[Soundbite] “There aren't many chances to have water fights like this in the city. I like it and it was a special experience.”

A performance is held some 10 meters up in the air on a tower crane. Other performances use all kinds of props.

[Soundbite] “We came to show our girls mime shows and let them experience a festival where you blend in with other people.”

The 23rd annual Chuncheon International Mime Festival features more than a 100 world-class teams from 12 countries including Korea, France and Australia.

[Soundbite]Yoo Jin-gyu (Art Director): “We'd like to expand and maximize such nanjangs to develop a new culture.”

The mime festival runs through Sunday.

7. School Gardens

[Anchor Lead]

Backyard gardening at school is growing popular among elementary school students. Children learn about the importance of nature while tending to the vegetables.

[Pkg]

A garden at an elementary school's backyard is crowded with children. Lettuce and pepper are being grown there. Students water the vegetables and remove weeds. They say they get great pleasure in observing and recording the growth of vegetables.

[Soundbite]Kim Geon-u (Elementary School Student): “The peppers were small. But now they’re big enough to eat.”

The organic vegetables are popular among students at lunchtime.

[Soundbite]Kim Dong-gyun (Elementary School Student): “I think the vegetables taste better because we grow them by ourselves. We eat more vegetables.”

Five schools in Seoul have backyard gardens. School gardens have good educational effects for students, such as recognizing the benefits of raising organic agricultural products. The Seoul Metropolitan Office of Education is accordingly encouraging more schools to operate backyard gardens.

[Soundbite]Park Hye-ja (Principal, Nokcheon Elementary School): “Students can understand farmers and will eventually appreciate their hard work.”

Schoolyard gardens offer children the opportunity to learn from nature.

8. Seoul Photos

[Anchor Lead]

A photo exhibition is on to show what Seoul looks like through the eyes of visitors to the city. Let's have a look.

[Pkg]

Every year, Seoul greets seven million and 500 thousand foreign tourists and 260,000 foreigners living in Seoul. Photos of Seoul taken by tourists have been displayed. Seoul is a city where the fading traditions are still respected. The people of Seoul do not mind waiting in a long line to buy hot steaming Korean dumplings called mandu at the marketplace. People spend time together over a glass of drink. Three generations, the grandmother, mother and daughter-in-law, work together making kimchi, while aged men play Korean chess called janggi with friends. People pray for good fortune offering liquor and money to the pig head. Tables are filled with a large, generous meal.

[Soundbite]Daniel Hewitt (1st Prize Winner)

Subway stations are crowded with people getting on and off the train. And the streets are filled with endless lines of cars. At night, the city is lit with bright, glamorous lights.

[Soundbite]Kim Ji-eun (Visitor): “The traditional and humble aspects seem to be interesting to foreigners. All such aspects can be seen here.”

The 40 photos of Seoul taken by foreigners will be shown until Thursday.

9. Smart Shoppers

[Anchor Lead]

There are places where you can get big discounts on certain days of the week. Let's get a closer look.

[Pkg]

This home appliance and furniture store has a swarm of customers every Sunday.

[Soundbite] “I took Sunday off to come here. I have to win!”

[Soundbite] “I came to get something for my home.”

Customers bid for things they want and if they win, they get what they've bid for just 1,000 won, or a bit less than a U.S. dollar.

[Soundbite] “Now let's start the draw!”

[Soundbite] “I won!”

Those who didn't win anything play rock, paper, scissors and the winner can buy appliances or furniture for a fourth of the original price.

[Soundbite] “Wow! This is mine!”

[Soundbite] “This is mine!”

If you’re shopping at these prices, you probably won’t want to shell out for delivery.

[Soundbite] “We knew we would win today so we brought a truck. I'm so happy to take it home with me.”

These people really know how to save.

This store sells furniture that has been displayed in model houses at half of the original price.

[Soundbite] “This furniture originally cost 1,160,000 won (US$1,072). But there's not even a scratch on it.”

This sofa originally cost around 1,500 dollars, but it’s half off. And this bed is more than 50 percent off.

[Soundbite] “I missed a good chance! This one's prettier. I should have come earlier.”

But there’s no need to worry too much, because more furniture comes in every week.

[Soundbite] “I come on weekdays to buy small home appliances. And I come to try out the bidding for bigger ones and buy at the original price if I don't win.”

This store holds discount sales for sheets and blankets every Saturday.

[Soundbite] “I like it! It's comfortable and soft.”

There are discounts of more than 70 percent. Products that originally cost about 150 dollars go for less than 30 and 90-dollar-items now cost under 19. Even though they're cheap, the quality is still good. This goose-down blanket, for example, is cool in the summer and warm in the winter. There’s a reason they can sell things so cheaply.

[Soundbite] “We have our own production plant so we can offer big discounts as we produce and sell directly to consumers.”

The big bundle cost less than 64 dollars.

[Soundbite] “I'm happy to buy three for the price of one. I love Saturdays!”

Now, it’s time for a massage. This is a traditional Thai massage center.

[Soundbite] “I came to relax. I'm so exhausted.”

[Soundbite] “It's too good a chance to miss!”

You can get a massage for half price on Mondays. Customers seem happy they came.

[Soundbite] “It's relaxing!”

[Soundbite] “It's relieving! I love it!”

[Soundbite] “I feel like a queen!”

You also get a hot foot bath and a cup of herbal tea as a bonus. It’s a great way to start off the week.

[Soundbite] “Getting a massage from head to foot and a nice cup of tea makes you feel like a V.I.P at 40,000 won (US$37).”

[Soundbite] “Monday is massage day! We love Monday!”

These great deals are definitely worth watching out for, so keep an eye on your calendar.
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