기사 본문 영역

상세페이지

Aftermath
입력 2012.03.06 (16:41) News Today
자동재생
동영상영역 시작
동영상영역 끝
[Anchor Lead]



The ruling and opposition parties are facing strong resistance from those excluded from the candidate lists for the April 11th general elections. Here’s a closer look.



[Pkg]



People protest the ruling Saenuri Party’s candidate nominations for the April general elections around party headquarters. Resistance is especially strong from those who were snubbed, as most of them are from a faction backing President Lee Myung-bak.



[Soundbite] Rep. Chin Soo-hee (Saenuri Party): "We agreed that the nomination results are difficult to understand. The standards for applying the cutoff rule were inconsistent."



The exclusions are considered a form of political revenge by acting ruling party leader Park Geun-hye.



[Soundbite] Rep. Chun Yu-ok (Saenuri Party): "Sadly, this is Chairwoman Park Geun-hye’s capacity and caliber. I think there must be political intentions."



The main opposition Democratic United Party has left out former government officials as candidates for constituencies in the Jeolla provinces. This has made the failed candidates furious. They say supporters of the late former President Roh Moo-hyun excluded them under the pretext of political identity.



[Soundbite] Rep. Choi In-kee (Democratic United Party): "Party chairwoman Han Myeong-sook must take the responsibility for unfair candidacy nominations."



Other unsuccessful candidates have rejected the nomination results, calling the standards vague. Many politicians who failed to win party nominations are expected to run as independents in the April general elections. This could serve as an unpredictable variable on the results.



Political Probe



[Anchor Lead]



Prosecutor Park Eun-jeong, who allegedly received an inappropriate request for an indictment from former lawmaker Na Kyung-won’s husband, submitted her testimony to police on Monday.



[Pkg]



Prosecutors have delivered to police the written testimony of prosecutor Park Eun-jeong, who allegedly had received an inappropriate request to indict someone from judge Kim Jae-ho. Kim also happens to be the husband of former lawmaker Na Kyung-won. The testimony provides clues as to whether Park indeed received the request from Kim. Back in November, Kim denied the accusation in a written statement when the police interrogated him. Both Kim and Park have expressed their stances in writing. Now the two are likely to go head to head over who is telling the truth. Internet radio broadcaster Nakkomsu had previously reported back in October that Na Kyung-won’s husband had asked Park to indict Internet users who were criticizing his wife. In response, Na sued Nakkomsu for defamation caused by the spread of groundless rumors about her. The broadcaster, for its part, has filed a counter-suit. The police will decide soon whether or not it will conduct an additional probe into Park and Kim on the matter.



Turnstile Hopping



[Anchor Lead]



A common site at subway stations in Seoul is passengers jumping the turnstiles. Now, the city government has announced a crackdown.



[Pkg]



A subway station is deserted at 5 a.m. A man who appears to be in his 50s looks around and jumps over the turnstile. A young man next to him also sneaks into the station and heads to the platform. And this man takes something from his pocket, opens the emergency gate, and easily gets in. Other passengers frown in seeing this.



[Soundbite] "Every time I see this, it really doesn’t look good. It’s happening while Seoul is becoming a globalized city."



More than 17,000 cases of turnstile hopping were caught in Seoul subways alone last year, resulting in 430,000 U.S. dollars in fines. In 73 percent of the cases, passengers simply didn’t pay the fare. The remainder tried to use tickets for the disabled and children.



[Soundbite] Sim Jae-u (City Hall Stationmaster (Line 2)): "If you get caught, you have to pay 30 times the fare; that’s a hefty price. You need to change your perception of yourself."



The Seoul Metropolitan Government will launch a crackdown over a one-month period by analyzing surveillance cameras installed at ticket gates.



Phone Addict



[Anchor Lead]



The smartphone is one of the most useful and convenient devices in the world. But addiction to the device is proving to be even more serious than to the Internet.



[Pkg]



This man keeps checking his smartphone while working out in a gym. He chats with someone on his smartphone in his palm while on the bike.



[Soundbite] "I keep holding it in my hands and using it. I keep checking it, sending messages and uploading photos."



A study has found that the addiction rate of smartphones is 8.4 percent, higher than the figure for the Internet of 7.7 percent.



[Soundbite] Prof. Kim Dae-jin (Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital): "The elements of smartphones excite the nucleus accumbens in the brain and promote the secretion of dopamine. So you would spend more time using it and if you don’t, you will feel anxious due to withdrawal symptoms."



Children tend to be more addicted to the Internet than adults. Nearly 8 percent of children between ages 5 and 9 are known to be Web junkies. Addiction has a more devastating effect on the mentality of children. So experts urge adults to be moderate in using smartphones and discourage their children from using them.



Breast Cancer



[Anchor Lead]



It has been found that among breast cancer patients, younger women face a greater risk. Here’s more.



[Pkg]



This 34 year old woman underwent surgery for breast cancer. She had neglected a lump she felt in her breast and was eventually diagnosed with a third stage breast cancer. She had to receive surgery and radiation therapy.



[Soundbite] "I keep holding and using this in my hands. I keep checking, sending messages and uploading photos."



According to results of a study by Severance Hospital, the risk of dying from breast cancer for patients 30 years old or under was 2.4 times higher than those over 35 years old. Meanwhile, for those in the 31 to 35 years old age bracket, the risk of dying is at 1.6 times higher compared to those over 35. The possibility of recurrence was higher for those in the younger age bracket. Younger cancer patients are at a higher risk level since the cancer cells are relatively more aggressive and younger women tend to overlook their health, only to discover the illness later. Among the total breast cancer patients in Korea, those under the age of 40 account for 25 percent. Accordingly, women 30 years old or older should self examine themselves every month.



[Soundbite] Prof. Kim Dae-jin (Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital): "The elements on smartphones excite the nucleus accumbens in the brain and promote the secretion of dopamine. So you would spend more time to using it and if you don’t, you will feel anxious due to withdrawal symptoms."



From the age of 35, one should get examined by a doctor every two years and from the age of 40, one should get chest x-rays taken once a year.



Bad Professors



[Anchor Lead]



Dance professors from provincial state-run universities are suspected to have embezzled money that their students earned for their performances and have even threatened their pupils. Here’s more.



[Pkg]



A dance performance is held on a makeshift stage in a park. The performers are students from a state-run university. They run about ten performances every year, but they have never once received any payments.



An investigation has revealed that the students’ professor has been receiving up to 27,000 dollars per concert from local governments. The finding has led many to suspect the professor of embezzling his students’ money. The Anti-Corruption & Civil Rights Commission has found that three university dance professors had embezzled their students’ money. Victims and their parents say that the embezzled amount exceeds 90,000 dollars.



[Soundbite] (Parent): "I’d rather not send my child to college; How can professors use their own students to make money?"



As KBS TV launched an expose on the issue, the involved professors tried to cover it up by getting help from their colleagues and university graduates to threaten their students. The National Police Agency has received investigation materials from the Anti-Corruption & Civil Rights Commission on the three professors and has launched a probe on the matter.



Activists in Danger



[Anchor Lead]



Several environmental activists have suffered serious injuries and one has even died while doing field work. They’ve worked to promote the public interest but failed to receive government support.



[Pkg]



An environmental activist sought to prevent the building of a golf course on Gulleop Island, which is two hours away from Incheon by ship and considered a rich ecological repository.



[Soundbite] Late Lee Seung-gi (Korea Green Club (Jun. 20, ‘09)): "The island will be shaved, except for cliffs. Ecological system will be destroyed and the topography will be changed."



But he died off the coast of the island in January. His family has submitted a petition to police, calling his death suspicious.



Choe Jong-in is a famous environmental activist who worked to preserve Shihwa Lake. But he has been hospitalized for three months after falling from a cliff while looking for an eagle owl.



The secretary-general of the environmental group Green Korea United, Seo Jae-cheol, fell in a forest and got an injury that took five weeks to recover from. He sought to protect Mount Gariwang, where ski slopes will be built for the 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Olympics.



[Soundbite] Prof. Lee Si-jae (Catholic University of Korea): "Environmental activists are people who work for the public interest. So when they’re in difficulties, they should be protected with the legal and institutional systems."



All of the activists have received no reward for their pro-environment efforts, proving the dire reality facing them.



Peony Tech



[Anchor Lead]



Peonies are commonly used as a medicinal ingredient or for ornamental purposes. Although the flower blooms in April, Korean scientists have developed the world’s first technology to grow the flower in winter.



[Pkg]



Peonies are in full bloom in a green house. Peonies generally blossom naturally outside in April. But the flowers are growing thanks to low-temperature treatments, in-box cultivations and the use of liquid fertilizer.



[Soundbite] Lee Jeong-gil (Farmer): "The low-temperature treatment enables me to produce them any time I want, regardless of whether it’s January, February or March."



Until now, it was impossible to see peonies bloom anywhere during the winter. With winter peonies likely to trade at a price ten times higher than that of roses, the nation has set its eyes on the peonies as a new good to export.



[Soundbite] Lee Jo-won (Regional Agri-Tech Center): "Peonies aren’t produced from January to March around the world. So producing them in the season will greatly help farmers earn more income."



Winter peonies are expected to become a new fruitful exporting item for the nation.



Flower Therapy



[Anchor Lead]



It’s no secret that flowers make people feel good. Some even say that they can be used to treat disease. It’s called “flower therapy.”



[Pkg]



A wide range of flowers are found at this flower market.



[Soundbite] "When I’m depressed, I buy flowers and look at them. Then I feel really refreshed and relaxed."



But flowers also have more surprising effects. KBS talked with horticulture therapist No Eun-sun, who chose the job after she felt the hidden power of flowers for herself.



[Soundbite] No Eun-sun (Horticulture Therapist): "My daughter was very happy when seeing the plants. She couldn’t live much longer. But while taking care of plants, she was really happy and lived longer. So my family practices horticulture therapy as volunteers to help other people in some small way."



She practices floral remedies at various places. Today, she’s visiting a daycare center. The kids look happy to see the flowers.



[Soundbite] "Children have variety of personalities. Flowers with pastel colors, herbs with little scents or small chrysanthemums are good for children who get easily distracted. And red or strong-colored flowers are good for passive or timid children."



Flower therapists say that children’s observation abilities and self confidence are given a boost when they grow plants by themselves. They also feel a sense of achievement when their plants bear fruit.



[Soundbite] U Hui-jin (Daycare Center Teacher): "There’s a child who doesn’t smile often. The child smiles at or talks to plants during the horticulture therapy session. And another child who gets easily distracted also focus on plants during the therapy. "



KBS conducted a study on the effects floral remedies have on adults. This woman is under heavy stress in her daily life. We measured her stress level. Her stress level is measured again after she spent an hour smelling flowers. The figures are distinctly different.



[Soundbite] Lee Jin-hui (Traditional Medicine Doctor): "This woman is basically healthy but some brain waves were awake or depressed. After she received horticulture therapy, she’s in a relaxed state with lots of healthy alpha waves seen."



[Soundbite] Lee Sang-mi (National Inst. of Horticultural & Herbal Science): "Flower arrangement was applied to housewives or final-stage cancer patients and their stress levels have dropped."



It’s easy to give yourself a bit of flower therapy at home.



[Soundbite] No Eun-sun (Horticulture Therapist): "In the kitchen, lots of carbon monoxide is created so ardisia pusilla, little scented freesia or hyacinths are good."



Plants good for children’s rooms include snakeskin plant, which is believed to act as an air purifier, or rosemary and fatsia, which some therapists claim can help your memory. In the bedroom, some plants can help you get a good night’s sleep.



[Soundbite] "Other plants take a rest at night. But succulent plants and moth orchid emit negative ions at night."



Lady palm or English ivy is good in the bathroom because they remove ammonia gas. Flower remedies make use of the various functions of plants to improve your mental and physical health.
  • Aftermath
    • 입력 2012-03-06 16:41:54
    News Today
[Anchor Lead]



The ruling and opposition parties are facing strong resistance from those excluded from the candidate lists for the April 11th general elections. Here’s a closer look.



[Pkg]



People protest the ruling Saenuri Party’s candidate nominations for the April general elections around party headquarters. Resistance is especially strong from those who were snubbed, as most of them are from a faction backing President Lee Myung-bak.



[Soundbite] Rep. Chin Soo-hee (Saenuri Party): "We agreed that the nomination results are difficult to understand. The standards for applying the cutoff rule were inconsistent."



The exclusions are considered a form of political revenge by acting ruling party leader Park Geun-hye.



[Soundbite] Rep. Chun Yu-ok (Saenuri Party): "Sadly, this is Chairwoman Park Geun-hye’s capacity and caliber. I think there must be political intentions."



The main opposition Democratic United Party has left out former government officials as candidates for constituencies in the Jeolla provinces. This has made the failed candidates furious. They say supporters of the late former President Roh Moo-hyun excluded them under the pretext of political identity.



[Soundbite] Rep. Choi In-kee (Democratic United Party): "Party chairwoman Han Myeong-sook must take the responsibility for unfair candidacy nominations."



Other unsuccessful candidates have rejected the nomination results, calling the standards vague. Many politicians who failed to win party nominations are expected to run as independents in the April general elections. This could serve as an unpredictable variable on the results.



Political Probe



[Anchor Lead]



Prosecutor Park Eun-jeong, who allegedly received an inappropriate request for an indictment from former lawmaker Na Kyung-won’s husband, submitted her testimony to police on Monday.



[Pkg]



Prosecutors have delivered to police the written testimony of prosecutor Park Eun-jeong, who allegedly had received an inappropriate request to indict someone from judge Kim Jae-ho. Kim also happens to be the husband of former lawmaker Na Kyung-won. The testimony provides clues as to whether Park indeed received the request from Kim. Back in November, Kim denied the accusation in a written statement when the police interrogated him. Both Kim and Park have expressed their stances in writing. Now the two are likely to go head to head over who is telling the truth. Internet radio broadcaster Nakkomsu had previously reported back in October that Na Kyung-won’s husband had asked Park to indict Internet users who were criticizing his wife. In response, Na sued Nakkomsu for defamation caused by the spread of groundless rumors about her. The broadcaster, for its part, has filed a counter-suit. The police will decide soon whether or not it will conduct an additional probe into Park and Kim on the matter.



Turnstile Hopping



[Anchor Lead]



A common site at subway stations in Seoul is passengers jumping the turnstiles. Now, the city government has announced a crackdown.



[Pkg]



A subway station is deserted at 5 a.m. A man who appears to be in his 50s looks around and jumps over the turnstile. A young man next to him also sneaks into the station and heads to the platform. And this man takes something from his pocket, opens the emergency gate, and easily gets in. Other passengers frown in seeing this.



[Soundbite] "Every time I see this, it really doesn’t look good. It’s happening while Seoul is becoming a globalized city."



More than 17,000 cases of turnstile hopping were caught in Seoul subways alone last year, resulting in 430,000 U.S. dollars in fines. In 73 percent of the cases, passengers simply didn’t pay the fare. The remainder tried to use tickets for the disabled and children.



[Soundbite] Sim Jae-u (City Hall Stationmaster (Line 2)): "If you get caught, you have to pay 30 times the fare; that’s a hefty price. You need to change your perception of yourself."



The Seoul Metropolitan Government will launch a crackdown over a one-month period by analyzing surveillance cameras installed at ticket gates.



Phone Addict



[Anchor Lead]



The smartphone is one of the most useful and convenient devices in the world. But addiction to the device is proving to be even more serious than to the Internet.



[Pkg]



This man keeps checking his smartphone while working out in a gym. He chats with someone on his smartphone in his palm while on the bike.



[Soundbite] "I keep holding it in my hands and using it. I keep checking it, sending messages and uploading photos."



A study has found that the addiction rate of smartphones is 8.4 percent, higher than the figure for the Internet of 7.7 percent.



[Soundbite] Prof. Kim Dae-jin (Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital): "The elements of smartphones excite the nucleus accumbens in the brain and promote the secretion of dopamine. So you would spend more time using it and if you don’t, you will feel anxious due to withdrawal symptoms."



Children tend to be more addicted to the Internet than adults. Nearly 8 percent of children between ages 5 and 9 are known to be Web junkies. Addiction has a more devastating effect on the mentality of children. So experts urge adults to be moderate in using smartphones and discourage their children from using them.



Breast Cancer



[Anchor Lead]



It has been found that among breast cancer patients, younger women face a greater risk. Here’s more.



[Pkg]



This 34 year old woman underwent surgery for breast cancer. She had neglected a lump she felt in her breast and was eventually diagnosed with a third stage breast cancer. She had to receive surgery and radiation therapy.



[Soundbite] "I keep holding and using this in my hands. I keep checking, sending messages and uploading photos."



According to results of a study by Severance Hospital, the risk of dying from breast cancer for patients 30 years old or under was 2.4 times higher than those over 35 years old. Meanwhile, for those in the 31 to 35 years old age bracket, the risk of dying is at 1.6 times higher compared to those over 35. The possibility of recurrence was higher for those in the younger age bracket. Younger cancer patients are at a higher risk level since the cancer cells are relatively more aggressive and younger women tend to overlook their health, only to discover the illness later. Among the total breast cancer patients in Korea, those under the age of 40 account for 25 percent. Accordingly, women 30 years old or older should self examine themselves every month.



[Soundbite] Prof. Kim Dae-jin (Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital): "The elements on smartphones excite the nucleus accumbens in the brain and promote the secretion of dopamine. So you would spend more time to using it and if you don’t, you will feel anxious due to withdrawal symptoms."



From the age of 35, one should get examined by a doctor every two years and from the age of 40, one should get chest x-rays taken once a year.



Bad Professors



[Anchor Lead]



Dance professors from provincial state-run universities are suspected to have embezzled money that their students earned for their performances and have even threatened their pupils. Here’s more.



[Pkg]



A dance performance is held on a makeshift stage in a park. The performers are students from a state-run university. They run about ten performances every year, but they have never once received any payments.



An investigation has revealed that the students’ professor has been receiving up to 27,000 dollars per concert from local governments. The finding has led many to suspect the professor of embezzling his students’ money. The Anti-Corruption & Civil Rights Commission has found that three university dance professors had embezzled their students’ money. Victims and their parents say that the embezzled amount exceeds 90,000 dollars.



[Soundbite] (Parent): "I’d rather not send my child to college; How can professors use their own students to make money?"



As KBS TV launched an expose on the issue, the involved professors tried to cover it up by getting help from their colleagues and university graduates to threaten their students. The National Police Agency has received investigation materials from the Anti-Corruption & Civil Rights Commission on the three professors and has launched a probe on the matter.



Activists in Danger



[Anchor Lead]



Several environmental activists have suffered serious injuries and one has even died while doing field work. They’ve worked to promote the public interest but failed to receive government support.



[Pkg]



An environmental activist sought to prevent the building of a golf course on Gulleop Island, which is two hours away from Incheon by ship and considered a rich ecological repository.



[Soundbite] Late Lee Seung-gi (Korea Green Club (Jun. 20, ‘09)): "The island will be shaved, except for cliffs. Ecological system will be destroyed and the topography will be changed."



But he died off the coast of the island in January. His family has submitted a petition to police, calling his death suspicious.



Choe Jong-in is a famous environmental activist who worked to preserve Shihwa Lake. But he has been hospitalized for three months after falling from a cliff while looking for an eagle owl.



The secretary-general of the environmental group Green Korea United, Seo Jae-cheol, fell in a forest and got an injury that took five weeks to recover from. He sought to protect Mount Gariwang, where ski slopes will be built for the 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Olympics.



[Soundbite] Prof. Lee Si-jae (Catholic University of Korea): "Environmental activists are people who work for the public interest. So when they’re in difficulties, they should be protected with the legal and institutional systems."



All of the activists have received no reward for their pro-environment efforts, proving the dire reality facing them.



Peony Tech



[Anchor Lead]



Peonies are commonly used as a medicinal ingredient or for ornamental purposes. Although the flower blooms in April, Korean scientists have developed the world’s first technology to grow the flower in winter.



[Pkg]



Peonies are in full bloom in a green house. Peonies generally blossom naturally outside in April. But the flowers are growing thanks to low-temperature treatments, in-box cultivations and the use of liquid fertilizer.



[Soundbite] Lee Jeong-gil (Farmer): "The low-temperature treatment enables me to produce them any time I want, regardless of whether it’s January, February or March."



Until now, it was impossible to see peonies bloom anywhere during the winter. With winter peonies likely to trade at a price ten times higher than that of roses, the nation has set its eyes on the peonies as a new good to export.



[Soundbite] Lee Jo-won (Regional Agri-Tech Center): "Peonies aren’t produced from January to March around the world. So producing them in the season will greatly help farmers earn more income."



Winter peonies are expected to become a new fruitful exporting item for the nation.



Flower Therapy



[Anchor Lead]



It’s no secret that flowers make people feel good. Some even say that they can be used to treat disease. It’s called “flower therapy.”



[Pkg]



A wide range of flowers are found at this flower market.



[Soundbite] "When I’m depressed, I buy flowers and look at them. Then I feel really refreshed and relaxed."



But flowers also have more surprising effects. KBS talked with horticulture therapist No Eun-sun, who chose the job after she felt the hidden power of flowers for herself.



[Soundbite] No Eun-sun (Horticulture Therapist): "My daughter was very happy when seeing the plants. She couldn’t live much longer. But while taking care of plants, she was really happy and lived longer. So my family practices horticulture therapy as volunteers to help other people in some small way."



She practices floral remedies at various places. Today, she’s visiting a daycare center. The kids look happy to see the flowers.



[Soundbite] "Children have variety of personalities. Flowers with pastel colors, herbs with little scents or small chrysanthemums are good for children who get easily distracted. And red or strong-colored flowers are good for passive or timid children."



Flower therapists say that children’s observation abilities and self confidence are given a boost when they grow plants by themselves. They also feel a sense of achievement when their plants bear fruit.



[Soundbite] U Hui-jin (Daycare Center Teacher): "There’s a child who doesn’t smile often. The child smiles at or talks to plants during the horticulture therapy session. And another child who gets easily distracted also focus on plants during the therapy. "



KBS conducted a study on the effects floral remedies have on adults. This woman is under heavy stress in her daily life. We measured her stress level. Her stress level is measured again after she spent an hour smelling flowers. The figures are distinctly different.



[Soundbite] Lee Jin-hui (Traditional Medicine Doctor): "This woman is basically healthy but some brain waves were awake or depressed. After she received horticulture therapy, she’s in a relaxed state with lots of healthy alpha waves seen."



[Soundbite] Lee Sang-mi (National Inst. of Horticultural & Herbal Science): "Flower arrangement was applied to housewives or final-stage cancer patients and their stress levels have dropped."



It’s easy to give yourself a bit of flower therapy at home.



[Soundbite] No Eun-sun (Horticulture Therapist): "In the kitchen, lots of carbon monoxide is created so ardisia pusilla, little scented freesia or hyacinths are good."



Plants good for children’s rooms include snakeskin plant, which is believed to act as an air purifier, or rosemary and fatsia, which some therapists claim can help your memory. In the bedroom, some plants can help you get a good night’s sleep.



[Soundbite] "Other plants take a rest at night. But succulent plants and moth orchid emit negative ions at night."



Lady palm or English ivy is good in the bathroom because they remove ammonia gas. Flower remedies make use of the various functions of plants to improve your mental and physical health.
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