기사 본문 영역

상세페이지

FTA Begins
입력 2012.03.15 (17:04) News Today
자동재생
동영상영역 시작
동영상영역 끝
[Anchor Lead]



Korea’s free trade agreement with the United States has officially taken effect. Here’s a look at what items Korean consumers can expect price cuts in.



[Pkg]



The sector to see the biggest price cuts under Korea’s free trade agreement with the U.S. is agriculture. The 24-percent tariff on cherries has been abolished. High tariffs on oranges, grapefruits, lemons, walnuts and cheese will be gradually removed. Prices of American wine will drop 10 percent due to the lifting of tariffs, putting competitive pressure on European and Chilean rivals. Tariffs on American cars will be cut in half from 8 percent to 4 percent. But Korean customers will see no reductions in the prices of certain well-known clothing brands and manufactured products.



[Soundbite] (Official, Clothing Import Company (Voice Modified)): "They’re not subject to tariff removal, since they’re manufactured in other countries."



Tariff removal will widen the range of product choices for Korean customers. But stiff competition with American rivals could threaten the survival of the Korean agricultural and pharmaceutical industries. Business groups in Korea have issued statements hailing the effectuation of the free trade agreement. But farmers’ organizations have held rallies against the accord.



 Election News



[Anchor Lead]



The ruling Saenuri Party is to announce the results of its eighth round of candidate selections today. Meanwhile, Democratic United Party Chairwoman Han Myung-sook has visited Busan where she criticized the leader of the ruling party, Park Geun-hye.



[Pkg]



The Saenuri Party is to announce the results of the eighth round of candidate selection on Thursday. Sources say the announced candidates will represent the party’s 10 most targeted areas, such as Seocho District in Seoul, as well as Busan and Daegu. The public candidate selection committee is to hold its first meeting on Thursday.



On Wednesday, candidates Park Sang-il and Lee Young-jo representing Gangnam District in Seoul withdrew their candidacies. Park Sang-il sparked a controversy by calling the Korea Independence Army a "small terrorist group," while Lee Young-jo came under fire for calling the May 18 pro-democracy movement in Gwangju a "popular revolt" and the Apr. 3 Jeju Uprising a "communist-led rebellion." The Saenuri Party Emergency Committee’s written statement urging the two to drop out of the race played a decisive role in prompting them to withdraw their candidacies.



Meanwhile, the Democratic United Party has announced the results of its fourth primaries. The party has chosen Nakkomsu producer Kim Yong-min to represent Nowon District in Seoul, which used to be represented by former lawmaker Chung Bong-joo.



The party leader, Han Myung-sook, has visited Busan, where she urged Saenuri Party leader, Park Geun-hye, to keep her promise on the naval base on Jeju Island.



[Soundbite] Han Myung-sook (Chairwoman, Democratic United Party): "She said that the public opinion mattered more than security and economy even if it requires a national referendum. If so, she must keep her promise."



The Democratic Party has also appointed lawmaker Kim Yoo-jung and former Democratic Labor Party spokesman Park Yong-jin as its new spokespeople.



 Disaster Institute



[Anchor Lead]



A new state-run think tank will research the environmental fallout from crises such as nuclear disasters and foot-and-mouth epidemics. The institute will help in the formulation of prevention policies and responses.



[Pkg]



Radiation was leaked after the nuclear meltdown at the Fukushima reactor following Japan’s massive earthquake in March last year. The ensuing detection of xenon and radioactive iodine in Korean waters has fueled worry in Korea over radioactive contamination.



Polluted water might flow in areas where culled animals were buried amid the spread of foot-and-mouth disease.



A new state-run think tank will research such environmental disasters with state-of-the-art technology. Researchers will analyze if earth, water and food are contaminated with radioactive materials and if imported agricultural products contain harmful substances. The institute will also promote measures to deal with environmental problems.



[Soundbite] Park Joon-taik (President, Korea Basic Science Institute): "The government has set up the research group at our institute to improve the quality of life and boost public happiness."



A cutting-edge neurological research center and fingerprint and body fluid analyzers will enable the development of scientific investigation techniques. The government will invest more than 20 million U.S. dollars to support the new institute over five years.



 Illegal Call Vans



[Anchor Lead]



Authorities have launched an intensive crackdown on so-called call vans that often charge tourists excessive fees.



[Pkg]



Crackdown officials follow a call van in Myeongdong, Seoul. Call vans must be loaded with heavy luggage in the trunk but this one is empty, which means it’s illegal. Call vans must be marked as vehicles for transporting freight so foreign tourists don’t mistake them for passenger vans, but this call van is not marked as such.



The Seoul City government has begun devising measures to prevent damage caused by illegal call vans that overcharge their passengers. Before, illegal call vans were suspended from operation for 60 days or levied around 530 U.S. dollars in fine, but from now on their business licenses will be cancelled altogether. The new regulations will also require that all call vans use standard meters to prevent drivers from overcharging their passengers. In April, when the tourism season peaks, crackdown officials will be dispatched to areas frequented by foreign tourists, such as Dongdaemun and Myeongdong, to step up the crackdown.



 Escalator Shock



[Anchor Lead]



A faulty escalator at a Seoul subway station has given a nasty shock to commuters. A worn-out part caused the escalator to suddenly reverse directions, injuring one person.



[Pkg]



Subway passengers hurriedly get off an escalator they were standing on. This is right after the escalator ran in the reverse direction for 15 seconds then stopped. The sudden switch in direction caused a middle-aged woman to fall down.



The accident occurred at Daerim station on Seoul subway line No. 7. The escalator was carrying around 60 passengers upwards when its direction suddenly shifted. This caused seven people to fall. Police say the part that helps the escalator move in a stable manner was broken, so the escalator failed to move up and instead went down. The part was too weak to endure the weight of the passengers. Experts also warn that walking or running up and down escalators can also cause such an accident.



[Soundbite] (Official, Seoul Metropolitan Rapid Transit Corp.): "If you run on the escalator, it will wear out faster."



The Seoul Metropolitan Rapid Transit Corporation has begun urgent inspections on escalators at subway stations. A PR campaign on escalator safety will also be beefed up.



 Yoga Benefits



[Anchor Lead]



Many people practice yoga to keep fit. In addition to helping burn fat, yoga also helps lower blood pressure and improve your metabolism.



[Pkg]



Yoga is a popular indoor exercise that’s combined with meditation. It helps relieve muscle tension, especially in the neck and shoulders. Yoga improves flexibility, eases pain and helps maintain good posture.



A study on the effects of yoga in overweight postmenopausal women showed that after four months of practicing yoga the women lost 2.3 kilograms and saw their waist size decrease by 1.3 centimeters. The women’s blood pressure dropped by eight and the blood sugar level by 6.5 points, while their levels of the bad cholesterol, known as low-density lipoprotein, fell by 10 milligrams per deciliter. Yoga helps train small muscles, which in turn helps the body enhance its insulin resistance and lower blood pressure and the blood sugar level.



[Soundbite] Prof. Park Won-ha (Samsung Medical Center): "It stimulates the range of motion of joints and strengthens muscle. It also activates tiny muscles to improve controllability."



Yoga also improves blood circulation and helps relieve fatigue. But yoga practitioners need to exercise caution against injury because yoga stimulates muscles and joints that are typically not used frequently in everyday life.



 Edu-Robots



[Anchor Lead]



A robot is helping children of parents with language disorders to learn how to speak. Here’s a look at how technology is helping the disabled.



[Pkg]



Both of Yun-jae’s parents have language disorders, but he can learn Korean from a robot.



[Soundbite] "(Dad!) Dad."



He learns how to speak by repeating what the robot says. Yun-jae also listens to an audio storybook by seeing pictures on the screen. His parents say they regret not being able to teach their child to speak, but add they’re happy to have his robot friend at home.



[Soundbite] Jeong Hyeon-gu (Father): "After coming back home at 3 or 4 pm., there’s no one to teach him. I think the robot will be a very helpful friend."



Experts say children whose parents have language disorders are likely to suffer from the same afflictions. So the robot can help such children with development of speech and communication skills.



[Soundbite] Jeon Hye-yeong (Sign Language Interpreter): "It’ll give him the feedback his parents can’t give and help their language development through conversations."



Volunteers say they’ll continue donating educational robots to children of parents with language disorders.



 Octopus Life



[Anchor Lead]



Octopuses are known for their ability to disguise themselves and for their intelligence. We now take you under the sea for a look into their lives.



[Pkg]



The skies above the Dokdo Islets on the easternmost tip of the Korean Peninsula are full of black-tailed gulls. But under the sea surface a completely different world reveals itself. An octopus hides between rocks and waits for its prey. When a fish is caught in the octopus suckers, there’s no way for it to escape. Another octopus hides in seaweeds and snatches a passing-by crab in the blink of an eye. Octopuses have predators as well, such as flatfish. Octopuses have an excellent ability to disguise in order to survive. They can transform themselves to look like part of a coral or seaweed. Octopuses also disguise their legs to look like sea snakes and remain unnoticed by their predators. Octopuses carry clamshells for self-protection. They’re the first invertebrate animal to use tools. After laying eggs, octopuses dedicate their utmost effort to protecting their youngsters. They gather stones to build fortresses to block invaders. When intruders approach, the mother-octopus gathers more stones and blocks the entrance with her own body. When the baby octopuses finally hatch after ten weeks and leave, the starved mother dies silently.



Hallyu Dancers



[Anchor Lead]



The Korean Wave is not only sweeping through sectors like movies, soap operas and pop music. Recently, another wave has been started up by Korean ballet dancers in Japan. Let’s go meet them.



[Pkg]



Many Korean Wave stars have raised global awareness of the country overseas. This time, it’s ballet dancers that are making a sensation.



On the streets of Tokyo, people gather around two Korean dancers to take photos with them. They are Kang Min-woo and Lee Seung-hyun.



At a theater in Tokyo, dancers look busy preparing for the day’s performance. The show is aimed at making ballet more approachable for a wider audience.



[Soundbite] Kang Min-woo (Ballet Dancer): "The piece is very paradoxical and has certain points for laughter. The characters’ compositions could be comical and they shout at each other sometmes. "



Koreans love their portmanteaus, and the two dancers have been given one. They’ve been called balledols, combining the words ballet and idol. They say they’re thankful for the attention but still feel a bit embarassed.



[Soundbite] Lee Seung-hyun (Ballet Dancer): "When I get (gifts,) I feel good but it makes me a little uncomfortable."



Japanese audience members who saw the company’s performance in 2010 have been drawn to the young Korean ballerinos. Last year when they toured three cities in Japan to perform “Giselle” a large number of fans flocked to theaters to see them.



[Soundbite]  "Let’s meet today’s guests, Lee Seung-hyun and Kang Min-woo. Please greet them a big round of applause."



They held a fan meet and greet event in Tokyo in January. They are said to be the world’s first ballerinos to hold such a meeting, and enjoyed getting to know their fans. One Japanese media outlet had a camera following Kang Min-woo everywhere he went.



[Soundbite] Tamura (Official, Japanese Broadcasting Company): "He’s an attractive dancer. His posture is straight and he’s very polite. He has a different charm from celebrities."



They’re popular in Japan not only because of their dancing skills, but also because they’re easy on the eyes.



For their performance on Feb. 28, they do their hair and make-up themselves. They practice to the very last moment before going on stage.



[Soundbite] Nakamura Sam (Official, Japanese Production Company): "You must have world-class skills and charisma to become such a star ballet dancer. If they show kindness and friendliness towards their fans, they can receive great support from them."



Audience members fill the seats and finally, it’s show time.



[Soundbite] "I had a great time watching because the dancers looked so lively and pleasant when dancing."



After the performance, fans line up to get autographs.



[Soundbite] "They looked really great. It was a nice performance."



[Soundbite] Lee Seung-hyun (Ballet Dancer): "I’m happy the response is good; we did okay. We still have more on schedule so I’ll work hard to do my best to the last."



These young dance stars are helping keep the Korean Wave alive.
  • FTA Begins
    • 입력 2012-03-15 17:04:15
    News Today
[Anchor Lead]



Korea’s free trade agreement with the United States has officially taken effect. Here’s a look at what items Korean consumers can expect price cuts in.



[Pkg]



The sector to see the biggest price cuts under Korea’s free trade agreement with the U.S. is agriculture. The 24-percent tariff on cherries has been abolished. High tariffs on oranges, grapefruits, lemons, walnuts and cheese will be gradually removed. Prices of American wine will drop 10 percent due to the lifting of tariffs, putting competitive pressure on European and Chilean rivals. Tariffs on American cars will be cut in half from 8 percent to 4 percent. But Korean customers will see no reductions in the prices of certain well-known clothing brands and manufactured products.



[Soundbite] (Official, Clothing Import Company (Voice Modified)): "They’re not subject to tariff removal, since they’re manufactured in other countries."



Tariff removal will widen the range of product choices for Korean customers. But stiff competition with American rivals could threaten the survival of the Korean agricultural and pharmaceutical industries. Business groups in Korea have issued statements hailing the effectuation of the free trade agreement. But farmers’ organizations have held rallies against the accord.



 Election News



[Anchor Lead]



The ruling Saenuri Party is to announce the results of its eighth round of candidate selections today. Meanwhile, Democratic United Party Chairwoman Han Myung-sook has visited Busan where she criticized the leader of the ruling party, Park Geun-hye.



[Pkg]



The Saenuri Party is to announce the results of the eighth round of candidate selection on Thursday. Sources say the announced candidates will represent the party’s 10 most targeted areas, such as Seocho District in Seoul, as well as Busan and Daegu. The public candidate selection committee is to hold its first meeting on Thursday.



On Wednesday, candidates Park Sang-il and Lee Young-jo representing Gangnam District in Seoul withdrew their candidacies. Park Sang-il sparked a controversy by calling the Korea Independence Army a "small terrorist group," while Lee Young-jo came under fire for calling the May 18 pro-democracy movement in Gwangju a "popular revolt" and the Apr. 3 Jeju Uprising a "communist-led rebellion." The Saenuri Party Emergency Committee’s written statement urging the two to drop out of the race played a decisive role in prompting them to withdraw their candidacies.



Meanwhile, the Democratic United Party has announced the results of its fourth primaries. The party has chosen Nakkomsu producer Kim Yong-min to represent Nowon District in Seoul, which used to be represented by former lawmaker Chung Bong-joo.



The party leader, Han Myung-sook, has visited Busan, where she urged Saenuri Party leader, Park Geun-hye, to keep her promise on the naval base on Jeju Island.



[Soundbite] Han Myung-sook (Chairwoman, Democratic United Party): "She said that the public opinion mattered more than security and economy even if it requires a national referendum. If so, she must keep her promise."



The Democratic Party has also appointed lawmaker Kim Yoo-jung and former Democratic Labor Party spokesman Park Yong-jin as its new spokespeople.



 Disaster Institute



[Anchor Lead]



A new state-run think tank will research the environmental fallout from crises such as nuclear disasters and foot-and-mouth epidemics. The institute will help in the formulation of prevention policies and responses.



[Pkg]



Radiation was leaked after the nuclear meltdown at the Fukushima reactor following Japan’s massive earthquake in March last year. The ensuing detection of xenon and radioactive iodine in Korean waters has fueled worry in Korea over radioactive contamination.



Polluted water might flow in areas where culled animals were buried amid the spread of foot-and-mouth disease.



A new state-run think tank will research such environmental disasters with state-of-the-art technology. Researchers will analyze if earth, water and food are contaminated with radioactive materials and if imported agricultural products contain harmful substances. The institute will also promote measures to deal with environmental problems.



[Soundbite] Park Joon-taik (President, Korea Basic Science Institute): "The government has set up the research group at our institute to improve the quality of life and boost public happiness."



A cutting-edge neurological research center and fingerprint and body fluid analyzers will enable the development of scientific investigation techniques. The government will invest more than 20 million U.S. dollars to support the new institute over five years.



 Illegal Call Vans



[Anchor Lead]



Authorities have launched an intensive crackdown on so-called call vans that often charge tourists excessive fees.



[Pkg]



Crackdown officials follow a call van in Myeongdong, Seoul. Call vans must be loaded with heavy luggage in the trunk but this one is empty, which means it’s illegal. Call vans must be marked as vehicles for transporting freight so foreign tourists don’t mistake them for passenger vans, but this call van is not marked as such.



The Seoul City government has begun devising measures to prevent damage caused by illegal call vans that overcharge their passengers. Before, illegal call vans were suspended from operation for 60 days or levied around 530 U.S. dollars in fine, but from now on their business licenses will be cancelled altogether. The new regulations will also require that all call vans use standard meters to prevent drivers from overcharging their passengers. In April, when the tourism season peaks, crackdown officials will be dispatched to areas frequented by foreign tourists, such as Dongdaemun and Myeongdong, to step up the crackdown.



 Escalator Shock



[Anchor Lead]



A faulty escalator at a Seoul subway station has given a nasty shock to commuters. A worn-out part caused the escalator to suddenly reverse directions, injuring one person.



[Pkg]



Subway passengers hurriedly get off an escalator they were standing on. This is right after the escalator ran in the reverse direction for 15 seconds then stopped. The sudden switch in direction caused a middle-aged woman to fall down.



The accident occurred at Daerim station on Seoul subway line No. 7. The escalator was carrying around 60 passengers upwards when its direction suddenly shifted. This caused seven people to fall. Police say the part that helps the escalator move in a stable manner was broken, so the escalator failed to move up and instead went down. The part was too weak to endure the weight of the passengers. Experts also warn that walking or running up and down escalators can also cause such an accident.



[Soundbite] (Official, Seoul Metropolitan Rapid Transit Corp.): "If you run on the escalator, it will wear out faster."



The Seoul Metropolitan Rapid Transit Corporation has begun urgent inspections on escalators at subway stations. A PR campaign on escalator safety will also be beefed up.



 Yoga Benefits



[Anchor Lead]



Many people practice yoga to keep fit. In addition to helping burn fat, yoga also helps lower blood pressure and improve your metabolism.



[Pkg]



Yoga is a popular indoor exercise that’s combined with meditation. It helps relieve muscle tension, especially in the neck and shoulders. Yoga improves flexibility, eases pain and helps maintain good posture.



A study on the effects of yoga in overweight postmenopausal women showed that after four months of practicing yoga the women lost 2.3 kilograms and saw their waist size decrease by 1.3 centimeters. The women’s blood pressure dropped by eight and the blood sugar level by 6.5 points, while their levels of the bad cholesterol, known as low-density lipoprotein, fell by 10 milligrams per deciliter. Yoga helps train small muscles, which in turn helps the body enhance its insulin resistance and lower blood pressure and the blood sugar level.



[Soundbite] Prof. Park Won-ha (Samsung Medical Center): "It stimulates the range of motion of joints and strengthens muscle. It also activates tiny muscles to improve controllability."



Yoga also improves blood circulation and helps relieve fatigue. But yoga practitioners need to exercise caution against injury because yoga stimulates muscles and joints that are typically not used frequently in everyday life.



 Edu-Robots



[Anchor Lead]



A robot is helping children of parents with language disorders to learn how to speak. Here’s a look at how technology is helping the disabled.



[Pkg]



Both of Yun-jae’s parents have language disorders, but he can learn Korean from a robot.



[Soundbite] "(Dad!) Dad."



He learns how to speak by repeating what the robot says. Yun-jae also listens to an audio storybook by seeing pictures on the screen. His parents say they regret not being able to teach their child to speak, but add they’re happy to have his robot friend at home.



[Soundbite] Jeong Hyeon-gu (Father): "After coming back home at 3 or 4 pm., there’s no one to teach him. I think the robot will be a very helpful friend."



Experts say children whose parents have language disorders are likely to suffer from the same afflictions. So the robot can help such children with development of speech and communication skills.



[Soundbite] Jeon Hye-yeong (Sign Language Interpreter): "It’ll give him the feedback his parents can’t give and help their language development through conversations."



Volunteers say they’ll continue donating educational robots to children of parents with language disorders.



 Octopus Life



[Anchor Lead]



Octopuses are known for their ability to disguise themselves and for their intelligence. We now take you under the sea for a look into their lives.



[Pkg]



The skies above the Dokdo Islets on the easternmost tip of the Korean Peninsula are full of black-tailed gulls. But under the sea surface a completely different world reveals itself. An octopus hides between rocks and waits for its prey. When a fish is caught in the octopus suckers, there’s no way for it to escape. Another octopus hides in seaweeds and snatches a passing-by crab in the blink of an eye. Octopuses have predators as well, such as flatfish. Octopuses have an excellent ability to disguise in order to survive. They can transform themselves to look like part of a coral or seaweed. Octopuses also disguise their legs to look like sea snakes and remain unnoticed by their predators. Octopuses carry clamshells for self-protection. They’re the first invertebrate animal to use tools. After laying eggs, octopuses dedicate their utmost effort to protecting their youngsters. They gather stones to build fortresses to block invaders. When intruders approach, the mother-octopus gathers more stones and blocks the entrance with her own body. When the baby octopuses finally hatch after ten weeks and leave, the starved mother dies silently.



Hallyu Dancers



[Anchor Lead]



The Korean Wave is not only sweeping through sectors like movies, soap operas and pop music. Recently, another wave has been started up by Korean ballet dancers in Japan. Let’s go meet them.



[Pkg]



Many Korean Wave stars have raised global awareness of the country overseas. This time, it’s ballet dancers that are making a sensation.



On the streets of Tokyo, people gather around two Korean dancers to take photos with them. They are Kang Min-woo and Lee Seung-hyun.



At a theater in Tokyo, dancers look busy preparing for the day’s performance. The show is aimed at making ballet more approachable for a wider audience.



[Soundbite] Kang Min-woo (Ballet Dancer): "The piece is very paradoxical and has certain points for laughter. The characters’ compositions could be comical and they shout at each other sometmes. "



Koreans love their portmanteaus, and the two dancers have been given one. They’ve been called balledols, combining the words ballet and idol. They say they’re thankful for the attention but still feel a bit embarassed.



[Soundbite] Lee Seung-hyun (Ballet Dancer): "When I get (gifts,) I feel good but it makes me a little uncomfortable."



Japanese audience members who saw the company’s performance in 2010 have been drawn to the young Korean ballerinos. Last year when they toured three cities in Japan to perform “Giselle” a large number of fans flocked to theaters to see them.



[Soundbite]  "Let’s meet today’s guests, Lee Seung-hyun and Kang Min-woo. Please greet them a big round of applause."



They held a fan meet and greet event in Tokyo in January. They are said to be the world’s first ballerinos to hold such a meeting, and enjoyed getting to know their fans. One Japanese media outlet had a camera following Kang Min-woo everywhere he went.



[Soundbite] Tamura (Official, Japanese Broadcasting Company): "He’s an attractive dancer. His posture is straight and he’s very polite. He has a different charm from celebrities."



They’re popular in Japan not only because of their dancing skills, but also because they’re easy on the eyes.



For their performance on Feb. 28, they do their hair and make-up themselves. They practice to the very last moment before going on stage.



[Soundbite] Nakamura Sam (Official, Japanese Production Company): "You must have world-class skills and charisma to become such a star ballet dancer. If they show kindness and friendliness towards their fans, they can receive great support from them."



Audience members fill the seats and finally, it’s show time.



[Soundbite] "I had a great time watching because the dancers looked so lively and pleasant when dancing."



After the performance, fans line up to get autographs.



[Soundbite] "They looked really great. It was a nice performance."



[Soundbite] Lee Seung-hyun (Ballet Dancer): "I’m happy the response is good; we did okay. We still have more on schedule so I’ll work hard to do my best to the last."



These young dance stars are helping keep the Korean Wave alive.
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