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Campaigns Begin
입력 2012.03.22 (17:35) News Today
자동재생
동영상영역 시작
동영상영역 끝
[Anchor Lead]



The ruling and main opposition parties have launched their campaign committees for next month’s elections. Here’s a look at the situation for each side.



[Pkg]



The ruling Saenuri Party has launched a campaign committee chaired by acting party leader Park Geun-hye. Park has pledged victory in next month’s general elections, adding she’ll bet everything on the elections following her resolution to change politics and save the nation.



[Soundbite] Rep. Park Geun-hye (Chairwoman, Saenuri Party Campaign Committee): "How can you put your life in the hands of forces who deny the past and change the promises they made to the public?"



Park even canceled the candidate nomination of Korea Health and Welfare Information Service chief Lee Bong-hwa after the party’s emergency leadership committee requested a review.



The main opposition Democratic United Party has also launched its campaign committee. Party chief Han Myeong-sook is the committee’s chairwoman, while former Prime Minister Lee Hae-chan and presidential hopefuls like Moon Jae-in, Chung Dong-young and Chung Sye-kyun will serve as special chairmen.



[Soundbite] Han Myoung-sook (Chairwoman, Democratic United Party): "If you lose, Korea will be a nation only for the privileged 1% of Koreans."



The main opposition party has also announced seven key policy visions in its campaign pledges, including economic democratization and universal welfare. But the completion of the candidate nomination process has led to internal conflict. Party adviser Sohn Hak-kyu has refused to join the campaign committee apparently because of disagreement with the candidate nominations. And Park Young-sun has announced her resignation from the party’s supreme council to protest the nomination results.



Human Errors



[Anchor Lead]



The power failure incident at the Kori nuclear power plant last month has revealed numerous holes in the plant’s management, such as a disregard for safety rules, an organized attempt to conceal the mishap, and poor post-management.



[Pkg]



The results of a probe by the Nuclear Safety and Security Commission show that the first reactor at the Kori nuclear power plant in Busan was initially scheduled to be repaired on Feb. 11. However, its management conducted the maintenance work three days earlier, on Feb. 8. Two of the three external power supplies connected to the reactor were under repair at the time. The nuclear power plant safety regulations state that at least two power supplies must be operating at all times in order to properly ensure safety. However, management disregarded this rule. As two of the three emergency power generators were already not operating at the time, the blackout during the repair occurred since the only power supply was mistakenly cut off by the technician.



[Soundbite] Park Yun-won (President, Korea Inst. of Nuclear Safety): "If (the maintenance) were conducted on Feb. 11 as scheduled, the station blackout would never have occurred because the external power supply would’ve worked properly."



Another shocking fact is that the staff replaced the nuclear fuel even though the emergency power generators were turned off at the moment and they relied solely on the external source of power.



[Soundbite] Yu Guk-hui (Nuclear Safety & Security Commission): "The nuclear fuel was withdrawn. We concluded that it was a violation of the safety rules."



During the blackout, the chief of the troubled reactor was in the Main Control Room, but he conspired with the other executives and decided not to report the accident. And the investigation also found another red flag. The management had decided to continue with the reactor’s operations for eight days after the incident even though its emergency power generators were still not working. The Nuclear Safety Commission says it will file criminal charges against the nuclear power plant officials for their failure to report the accident. It will also decide on whether the reactor will continue with its operations after conducting a thorough inspection of its power supply system.



Salt Alert



[Anchor Lead]



Koreans love salty food. But experts say cutting salt consumption could greatly reduce social costs in the country, medical spending in particular.



[Pkg]



This restaurant is filled with office workers at lunch time. Many of them say they prefer salty dishes.



[Soundbite] "As I often eat lunch out, I eat a bit saltier than at home. I think I’m getting used to salty food."



The problem with this is the sodium in salt.



[Soundbite] Prof. Park Jin-ho (Seoul National University): "Sodium absorbs water into the body. So it raises the blood pressure and causes heart and cerebrovascular disease. And as the water is discharged through the kidneys, chronic kidney diseases or kidney stones can occur as well."



By cutting average sodium intake by about one third, 11.5 billion U.S. dollars could be saved. The savings would include medical costs of 2.65 billion U.S. dollars and fees of nearly 9 billion dollars incurred after death. So the government is planning a national campaign led by the private sector to recommend a low sodium diet. Health authorities aim to reduce the average daily intake of sodium by at least 2.5 grams by 2020.



Walking Fever



[Anchor Lead]



An increasing number of people choose to walk as a way to stay in shape instead of spending money on exercise. As such, more and more businesses are targeting walkers.



[Pkg]



Some 80 people are taking part in a class given by a government district office. They are learning how to walk properly.



[Soundbite] "I stay healthy by walking. I’ve never caught a cold."



The weather for walking is back. And office workers change into sneakers and head out for a nice stroll outside during their lunch break. Many people walk in parks late at night. The zeal for walking has led to the creation of trails in 20 regions in Korea, including on Jeju Island and on Mount Jiri. Meanwhile, the market in which businesses are targeting walkers is growing rapidly. The volume of the walking shoes market is worth roughly 620 million dollars. Avid walkers are drawn to shoes with sophisticated designs and other features. Some eight million Koreans exercise by walking more than three times a week as it helps them to not only strengthen their bodies but also clears their minds.



PE Classes



[Anchor Lead]



More middle schools nationwide have expanded physical education classes to prevent school violence. But the increase in gym classes hasn’t spread equally throughout the country.



[Pkg]



Students at this middle school are taking four hours of physical education per week this semester, up from three last semester. The situation is the opposite at other middle schools in the same neighborhood. Just seventh graders now have one extra P.E. class, whereas those in ninth grade have up to two hours a week, the same as last year.



The rise in physical education classes differs by region. About half of middle schools in Seoul have expanded their P.E. classes, but just 10 percent of schools in Gyeonggi Province have done so and none in North Jeolla Province. The schools that haven’t expanded physical education blame lack of preparation time.



[Soundbite] (Middle School Teacher (Voice Modified)): "It was a hurried decision; schools are reluctant because they’ve already devised their plans for the new semester."



The Education Ministry says the school superintendents of Seoul and Gyeonggi and North Jeolla provinces apparently oppose the ministry’s pro-physical education policy because of their progressive-minded views. The ministry will continue encouraging schools to expand physical education by helping them find teachers and providing financial support.



Crop Damage



[Anchor Lead]



Abrupt changes in the weather are wreaking havoc on crops in Korea, affecting both quality and yield. Take a look.



[Pkg]



Tomatoes await shipping. Their stems and fruits are covered in mold. The fruits have small seeds and look paler than usual. Humidity is the main culprit. However, ventilation in the greenhouses is not easy because of the low temperature and cloudy weather.



The situation is just as desperate on strawberry and herb farms. Crops cannot grow well this spring because of the fewer sunny days and high humidity, which is caused by the frequent rainy days and the unusually late cold spell. For greenhouses with an indoor temperature of over 30 degrees Celsius during the day, there is a wide temperature gap depending on the time. The difference between morning and daytime temperatures alone surpasses 20 degrees.



[Soundbite] Eom Mi-jeong (Provincial Agricultural R&E Services): "You should ventilate regularly and water crops at noon to prevent a sudden plunge in the soil temperature."



More crop damage is expected later this month due to a forecast of the annual yellow dust storm, which originate in China’s Gobi Desert.



Navy Aid



[Anchor Lead]



The construction site for a disputed naval base on Jeju Island has become a venue of conflict and confrontation. Now, in a move perhaps aimed at diffusing the situation, a visiting naval vessel has offered free medical services to the island’s iconic female divers.



[Pkg]



The Navy’s salvage and rescue ship Pyeongtaek has visited Jeju Island. This visit isn’t for an operation but for offering free medical services to female divers in Jeju. Naval forces let divers use a decompression chamber for free. The divers would normally have to go to a faraway hospital to get treated for decompression illness. So they express thanks for the favor.



[Soundbite] O Bong-hui (Diver): "We can work and earn money when we can hear; if we don’t hear, we can’t. These are the most important for us. (You feel better after receiving getting treated?) Yes, I’m getting better gradually."



The Pyeongtaek will stay in Jeju through Saturday to offer free services in orthopaedics and ear, nose and throat treatment. Traditional Korean medicine is especially popular among female divers, who suffer chronic joint and muscle pain. Two more naval vessels will visit Jeju to offer free medical services this year.



Planet of Snail



[Anchor Lead]



The documentary drama "Planet of Snail" is a love story of two people with disabilities finding each other. The film is opening on Thursday in Korea.



[Pkg]



Young-chan has been both blind and deaf since birth. His life runs at a very low speed, like that of a snail. Soon-ho is another person with a disability. As the couple falls in love, she is able to link Young-chan to the outside world. Young-chan finds frustration in little things in daily life, such as changing lamps, but he learns to appreciate the world through his fingertips. The couple appreciates every bit of their lives, and their love story is profoundly touching and moving.



The "Planet of Snail" is the first Korean movie to win the best feature length documentary prize at the 24th International Documentary Film Festival Amsterdam.



[Soundbite] Yi Seung-Jun (Director, “Planet of Snail”): "Their love is based on sympathy. Viewers say they all feel that and some people even got healed."



Young-chan says everything seemed foggy and vague. But his fear of being locked in darkness disappeared soon after he met Soon-ho. The movie "Planet of Snail" reminds people how profound love is able to help overcome some of life’s most daunting obstacles.



Tongyeong Trip



[Anchor Lead]



Tongyeong in South Gyeongsang Province is known for its impressive view of some 500 islands against the backdrop of the sea. Today we take a tour of the area and sample some of its specialties.



[Pkg]



Tongyeong is known for its diverse cuisine as well as Mt. Mireuk, from which you get a view of the body of water known in Korea as Namhae and the Hallyeo Waterway.



[Soundbite] "My heart is opening. I feel alive."



[Soundbite] "It’s awesome. "



A tour of Tongyeong begins with a cable car ride up Mt. Mireuk. On the mountain top, you get a full view of the entire city. The cable car runs 1,975 meters and is the longest in the country. It takes ten minutes to reach the top. The panorama from the peak is impressive.



[Soundbite] "On the cable car, it feels like you’re on a plane. I want to bungee jump right here and now."



And you can have a meal while enjoying the view.



[Soundbite] "It’s so nice to come out in the open after living in trapped spaces; I feel so refreshed."



Now, we head back down to tour the city.



[Soundbite] "The islands you can see here and there are beautiful and the view is really nice."



Tongyeong consists of some 500 islets and most of them are covered with Japanese camellia trees. Clusters of subtropical plants also grow among the camellia, and the islands are lush green all year round.



[Soundbite] Jo Jong-tae (President, Jangsa Island Marine Park): "The autogenous camellia tree is the main plant on the islands. And evergreen trees including banyans and the Japanese chinquapins account for 80% of the greenery."



Now we head to the Tongyeong undersea tunnel.



[Soundbite] Lee Sun-im (Cultural Commentator): "Downtown Tonyeong is on this side and Mireuk Island is over there. The tunnel is an undersea road that connects one village to another."



This underwater tunnel was made during the Japanese colonial era and is the first of its kind in Asia. It is Korea’s registered cultural asset No. 201.



[Soundbite] "I took this road a lot during my childhood when I was eight years old."



The tunnel is mainly visited by tourists these days. What you eat is as important as what you see while traveling. Tongyeong Port is known as the Naples of Asia locally. False sea squirts are in their peak harvest season at the port these days.



[Soundbite] "Take off the shell with a knife and eat it raw; it’s really tasty. You can also enjoy the shell by pouring liquor on it."



Starry flounder, a type of flatfish, is also in season.



[Soundbite] "You didn’t know that? Add mugwort to the starry flounder stew. "



A soup dish made with this fish and some mugwort is said to be the number one spring specialty in Tongyeong.



[Soundbite] "The fish is refreshing and mugwort has a great aroma; starry flounder mugwort soup is the best spring delicacy."



This is the rice dish bibimbab topped off with fresh sea squirts.



[Soundbite] "All the ingredients are mixed but the seasoning doesn’t overpower their true taste; it’s uniquely delicious."



[Soundbite] "It tastes different from the sea squirts I had on the beach. The taste is nice and I have no problem enjoying it."



Spring is a great time of year for a trip to Tongyeong.
  • Campaigns Begin
    • 입력 2012-03-22 17:35:56
    News Today
[Anchor Lead]



The ruling and main opposition parties have launched their campaign committees for next month’s elections. Here’s a look at the situation for each side.



[Pkg]



The ruling Saenuri Party has launched a campaign committee chaired by acting party leader Park Geun-hye. Park has pledged victory in next month’s general elections, adding she’ll bet everything on the elections following her resolution to change politics and save the nation.



[Soundbite] Rep. Park Geun-hye (Chairwoman, Saenuri Party Campaign Committee): "How can you put your life in the hands of forces who deny the past and change the promises they made to the public?"



Park even canceled the candidate nomination of Korea Health and Welfare Information Service chief Lee Bong-hwa after the party’s emergency leadership committee requested a review.



The main opposition Democratic United Party has also launched its campaign committee. Party chief Han Myeong-sook is the committee’s chairwoman, while former Prime Minister Lee Hae-chan and presidential hopefuls like Moon Jae-in, Chung Dong-young and Chung Sye-kyun will serve as special chairmen.



[Soundbite] Han Myoung-sook (Chairwoman, Democratic United Party): "If you lose, Korea will be a nation only for the privileged 1% of Koreans."



The main opposition party has also announced seven key policy visions in its campaign pledges, including economic democratization and universal welfare. But the completion of the candidate nomination process has led to internal conflict. Party adviser Sohn Hak-kyu has refused to join the campaign committee apparently because of disagreement with the candidate nominations. And Park Young-sun has announced her resignation from the party’s supreme council to protest the nomination results.



Human Errors



[Anchor Lead]



The power failure incident at the Kori nuclear power plant last month has revealed numerous holes in the plant’s management, such as a disregard for safety rules, an organized attempt to conceal the mishap, and poor post-management.



[Pkg]



The results of a probe by the Nuclear Safety and Security Commission show that the first reactor at the Kori nuclear power plant in Busan was initially scheduled to be repaired on Feb. 11. However, its management conducted the maintenance work three days earlier, on Feb. 8. Two of the three external power supplies connected to the reactor were under repair at the time. The nuclear power plant safety regulations state that at least two power supplies must be operating at all times in order to properly ensure safety. However, management disregarded this rule. As two of the three emergency power generators were already not operating at the time, the blackout during the repair occurred since the only power supply was mistakenly cut off by the technician.



[Soundbite] Park Yun-won (President, Korea Inst. of Nuclear Safety): "If (the maintenance) were conducted on Feb. 11 as scheduled, the station blackout would never have occurred because the external power supply would’ve worked properly."



Another shocking fact is that the staff replaced the nuclear fuel even though the emergency power generators were turned off at the moment and they relied solely on the external source of power.



[Soundbite] Yu Guk-hui (Nuclear Safety & Security Commission): "The nuclear fuel was withdrawn. We concluded that it was a violation of the safety rules."



During the blackout, the chief of the troubled reactor was in the Main Control Room, but he conspired with the other executives and decided not to report the accident. And the investigation also found another red flag. The management had decided to continue with the reactor’s operations for eight days after the incident even though its emergency power generators were still not working. The Nuclear Safety Commission says it will file criminal charges against the nuclear power plant officials for their failure to report the accident. It will also decide on whether the reactor will continue with its operations after conducting a thorough inspection of its power supply system.



Salt Alert



[Anchor Lead]



Koreans love salty food. But experts say cutting salt consumption could greatly reduce social costs in the country, medical spending in particular.



[Pkg]



This restaurant is filled with office workers at lunch time. Many of them say they prefer salty dishes.



[Soundbite] "As I often eat lunch out, I eat a bit saltier than at home. I think I’m getting used to salty food."



The problem with this is the sodium in salt.



[Soundbite] Prof. Park Jin-ho (Seoul National University): "Sodium absorbs water into the body. So it raises the blood pressure and causes heart and cerebrovascular disease. And as the water is discharged through the kidneys, chronic kidney diseases or kidney stones can occur as well."



By cutting average sodium intake by about one third, 11.5 billion U.S. dollars could be saved. The savings would include medical costs of 2.65 billion U.S. dollars and fees of nearly 9 billion dollars incurred after death. So the government is planning a national campaign led by the private sector to recommend a low sodium diet. Health authorities aim to reduce the average daily intake of sodium by at least 2.5 grams by 2020.



Walking Fever



[Anchor Lead]



An increasing number of people choose to walk as a way to stay in shape instead of spending money on exercise. As such, more and more businesses are targeting walkers.



[Pkg]



Some 80 people are taking part in a class given by a government district office. They are learning how to walk properly.



[Soundbite] "I stay healthy by walking. I’ve never caught a cold."



The weather for walking is back. And office workers change into sneakers and head out for a nice stroll outside during their lunch break. Many people walk in parks late at night. The zeal for walking has led to the creation of trails in 20 regions in Korea, including on Jeju Island and on Mount Jiri. Meanwhile, the market in which businesses are targeting walkers is growing rapidly. The volume of the walking shoes market is worth roughly 620 million dollars. Avid walkers are drawn to shoes with sophisticated designs and other features. Some eight million Koreans exercise by walking more than three times a week as it helps them to not only strengthen their bodies but also clears their minds.



PE Classes



[Anchor Lead]



More middle schools nationwide have expanded physical education classes to prevent school violence. But the increase in gym classes hasn’t spread equally throughout the country.



[Pkg]



Students at this middle school are taking four hours of physical education per week this semester, up from three last semester. The situation is the opposite at other middle schools in the same neighborhood. Just seventh graders now have one extra P.E. class, whereas those in ninth grade have up to two hours a week, the same as last year.



The rise in physical education classes differs by region. About half of middle schools in Seoul have expanded their P.E. classes, but just 10 percent of schools in Gyeonggi Province have done so and none in North Jeolla Province. The schools that haven’t expanded physical education blame lack of preparation time.



[Soundbite] (Middle School Teacher (Voice Modified)): "It was a hurried decision; schools are reluctant because they’ve already devised their plans for the new semester."



The Education Ministry says the school superintendents of Seoul and Gyeonggi and North Jeolla provinces apparently oppose the ministry’s pro-physical education policy because of their progressive-minded views. The ministry will continue encouraging schools to expand physical education by helping them find teachers and providing financial support.



Crop Damage



[Anchor Lead]



Abrupt changes in the weather are wreaking havoc on crops in Korea, affecting both quality and yield. Take a look.



[Pkg]



Tomatoes await shipping. Their stems and fruits are covered in mold. The fruits have small seeds and look paler than usual. Humidity is the main culprit. However, ventilation in the greenhouses is not easy because of the low temperature and cloudy weather.



The situation is just as desperate on strawberry and herb farms. Crops cannot grow well this spring because of the fewer sunny days and high humidity, which is caused by the frequent rainy days and the unusually late cold spell. For greenhouses with an indoor temperature of over 30 degrees Celsius during the day, there is a wide temperature gap depending on the time. The difference between morning and daytime temperatures alone surpasses 20 degrees.



[Soundbite] Eom Mi-jeong (Provincial Agricultural R&E Services): "You should ventilate regularly and water crops at noon to prevent a sudden plunge in the soil temperature."



More crop damage is expected later this month due to a forecast of the annual yellow dust storm, which originate in China’s Gobi Desert.



Navy Aid



[Anchor Lead]



The construction site for a disputed naval base on Jeju Island has become a venue of conflict and confrontation. Now, in a move perhaps aimed at diffusing the situation, a visiting naval vessel has offered free medical services to the island’s iconic female divers.



[Pkg]



The Navy’s salvage and rescue ship Pyeongtaek has visited Jeju Island. This visit isn’t for an operation but for offering free medical services to female divers in Jeju. Naval forces let divers use a decompression chamber for free. The divers would normally have to go to a faraway hospital to get treated for decompression illness. So they express thanks for the favor.



[Soundbite] O Bong-hui (Diver): "We can work and earn money when we can hear; if we don’t hear, we can’t. These are the most important for us. (You feel better after receiving getting treated?) Yes, I’m getting better gradually."



The Pyeongtaek will stay in Jeju through Saturday to offer free services in orthopaedics and ear, nose and throat treatment. Traditional Korean medicine is especially popular among female divers, who suffer chronic joint and muscle pain. Two more naval vessels will visit Jeju to offer free medical services this year.



Planet of Snail



[Anchor Lead]



The documentary drama "Planet of Snail" is a love story of two people with disabilities finding each other. The film is opening on Thursday in Korea.



[Pkg]



Young-chan has been both blind and deaf since birth. His life runs at a very low speed, like that of a snail. Soon-ho is another person with a disability. As the couple falls in love, she is able to link Young-chan to the outside world. Young-chan finds frustration in little things in daily life, such as changing lamps, but he learns to appreciate the world through his fingertips. The couple appreciates every bit of their lives, and their love story is profoundly touching and moving.



The "Planet of Snail" is the first Korean movie to win the best feature length documentary prize at the 24th International Documentary Film Festival Amsterdam.



[Soundbite] Yi Seung-Jun (Director, “Planet of Snail”): "Their love is based on sympathy. Viewers say they all feel that and some people even got healed."



Young-chan says everything seemed foggy and vague. But his fear of being locked in darkness disappeared soon after he met Soon-ho. The movie "Planet of Snail" reminds people how profound love is able to help overcome some of life’s most daunting obstacles.



Tongyeong Trip



[Anchor Lead]



Tongyeong in South Gyeongsang Province is known for its impressive view of some 500 islands against the backdrop of the sea. Today we take a tour of the area and sample some of its specialties.



[Pkg]



Tongyeong is known for its diverse cuisine as well as Mt. Mireuk, from which you get a view of the body of water known in Korea as Namhae and the Hallyeo Waterway.



[Soundbite] "My heart is opening. I feel alive."



[Soundbite] "It’s awesome. "



A tour of Tongyeong begins with a cable car ride up Mt. Mireuk. On the mountain top, you get a full view of the entire city. The cable car runs 1,975 meters and is the longest in the country. It takes ten minutes to reach the top. The panorama from the peak is impressive.



[Soundbite] "On the cable car, it feels like you’re on a plane. I want to bungee jump right here and now."



And you can have a meal while enjoying the view.



[Soundbite] "It’s so nice to come out in the open after living in trapped spaces; I feel so refreshed."



Now, we head back down to tour the city.



[Soundbite] "The islands you can see here and there are beautiful and the view is really nice."



Tongyeong consists of some 500 islets and most of them are covered with Japanese camellia trees. Clusters of subtropical plants also grow among the camellia, and the islands are lush green all year round.



[Soundbite] Jo Jong-tae (President, Jangsa Island Marine Park): "The autogenous camellia tree is the main plant on the islands. And evergreen trees including banyans and the Japanese chinquapins account for 80% of the greenery."



Now we head to the Tongyeong undersea tunnel.



[Soundbite] Lee Sun-im (Cultural Commentator): "Downtown Tonyeong is on this side and Mireuk Island is over there. The tunnel is an undersea road that connects one village to another."



This underwater tunnel was made during the Japanese colonial era and is the first of its kind in Asia. It is Korea’s registered cultural asset No. 201.



[Soundbite] "I took this road a lot during my childhood when I was eight years old."



The tunnel is mainly visited by tourists these days. What you eat is as important as what you see while traveling. Tongyeong Port is known as the Naples of Asia locally. False sea squirts are in their peak harvest season at the port these days.



[Soundbite] "Take off the shell with a knife and eat it raw; it’s really tasty. You can also enjoy the shell by pouring liquor on it."



Starry flounder, a type of flatfish, is also in season.



[Soundbite] "You didn’t know that? Add mugwort to the starry flounder stew. "



A soup dish made with this fish and some mugwort is said to be the number one spring specialty in Tongyeong.



[Soundbite] "The fish is refreshing and mugwort has a great aroma; starry flounder mugwort soup is the best spring delicacy."



This is the rice dish bibimbab topped off with fresh sea squirts.



[Soundbite] "All the ingredients are mixed but the seasoning doesn’t overpower their true taste; it’s uniquely delicious."



[Soundbite] "It tastes different from the sea squirts I had on the beach. The taste is nice and I have no problem enjoying it."



Spring is a great time of year for a trip to Tongyeong.
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