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Election Results
입력 2012.04.12 (16:55) News Today
자동재생
동영상영역 시작
동영상영역 끝
[Anchor Lead]



The ruling Saenuri Party has pulled off an upset in the general elections, winning a parliamentary majority



[Pkg]



The ruling Saenuri Party has won 152 of 300 seats in the National Assembly in an upset victory in the general elections. The main opposition Democratic United Party has 127 seats and the minor United Progressive Party 13. Saenuri has retained its parliamentary majority and also gotten a headstart in future political contests. But the relatively small margin of victory will likely prompt the ruling party to take its opposition rival head on over every major political issue. The main opposition party will probably seek to compensate for its latest defeat by stressing its ideological features. The party is thus predicted to attack the ruling party on all key issues. The main opposition party wants an independent probe or a parliamentary hearing on the suspected illegal surveillance of civilians and corruption scandals surrounding the president’s aides and relatives. But the ruling party is also expected to actively respond to its rival’s offensive. So the political situation should rapidly cool down. The ruling party’s victory has helped ease fears over President Lee Myung-bak becoming a lame duck. Others predict that acting party chief Park Geun-hye will try to distance herself from the incumbent administration to solidify her status as a leading presidential hopeful. In addition, the United Progressive Party has become the No. 3 party in the National Assembly. The party has pledged to take the initiative in political developments.



2. New Voting



[Anchor Lead]



From traditional music performances to photos being shot at the scene, the atmosphere at polling centers was not like it used to be yesterday.



[Pkg]



It’s drizzling outside, but polling centers are full of voters. Many of them have brought their children to show them how to exercise their voting rights. A familiar traditional tune plays at the entrance of this polling center. The performance was organized by a local election commission to encourage the public to vote, and voters seem to like it.



[Soundbite] “The campaign was very fierce and rigid, so it’s good to hear welcoming tunes playing for voters.”



People in their 20s and 30s make sure to take commemorative snapshots at the polling stations. This new tradition is a result of the popularity of smartphones and a new regulation that allows photographing in front of polling stations. Meanwhile, local election commissions were flooded with inquiries on what is allowed and what is banned by the revised Election Law to encourage voting.



3. Painful Costs



[Anchor Lead]



Treating terminally ill patients with little or no chance of recovery costs huge amounts of money every year. A survey has found that an excessive amount is spent on medical costs not long before death.



[Pkg]



This patient with late-stage cancer is unlikely to recover. But she and her family live in pain because they haven’t stopped treatment.



[Soundbite](Family Member): “More and more procedures are added to make it harder; it’s financially difficult.”



A Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service study has analyzed 470,000 patients. Medical costs spent per patient one year before death reached 9,600 U.S. dollars, nine times that spent by an average patient. One cause for this is the high cost of tests and treatment for prolonging life though the possibility of recovery is very low.



[Soundbite]Prof. Lee Su-hui (Korea University Guro Hospital): “Hospitalizing patients in the ICU and giving useless treatment is depriving them of the right to die with dignity, and burdening their families with economic difficulties.”



What the terminally ill need most is not useless treatment to prolong their lives, but palliative care to relieve pain and promote a sense of psychological security. The government will have health insurance cover palliative care such as hospice services.



4. Night Riders



[Anchor Lead]



Cyclists are advised to take extra caution during nighttime rides, as Korean bike paths often lack safety additions like fences and lights.



[Pkg]



Scores of people ride bikes late in the evening. But chances of bumping into obstacles and even people are high in darkness. Many bike paths in Korea lack safety facilities such as fences and lights. The number of cyclists keeps rising in the nation but the lack of safety facilities has resulted in a growing number of accidents. It rose from 7,900 in 2005 to more than 10,000 in 2010. The number of deaths and injuries among cyclists also keeps surging. Some local governments have installed fences equipped with fluorescent lights along bike paths.



[Soundbite] “When safety facilities aren’t in place, I’m reluctant to ride a bike even during the daytime because of the risk of accidents. But now, I feel free to ride at night thanks to the safety facilities.”



Some districts in Seoul have requested the Seoul metropolitan government to install safety facilities along bike paths, but their requests were turned down due to the lack of budget. Installing safety facilities on bike paths is urgent to ensure cyclists’ safety.



5. Festival Flop



[Anchor Lead]



An annual cherry blossom festival in Jinhae, South Gyeongsang Province, is one of the nation’s most popular events in spring. But tourists are complaining about a host of safety and parking problems there.



[Pkg]



People flock to near a railway as a train approaches. Tourists want to take photos of a train passing under a cherry tree heavy with pink blossoms. But a tourist was hit by a train and seriously wounded in last year’s festival. A "no crossing" line serve as the lone safety measure but is almost useless. Roads near spots famous for cherry blossoms have turned into virtual parking lots due to lack of parking facilities. Hundreds of thousands of people visit the cherry blossom festival every day. But existing parking facilities are insufficient. Finding a restroom sign is also hard.



[Soundbite] “They should install parking lots and restrooms before attracting tourists. Now, this isn’t a tourist attraction because of its poor facilities.”



Cherry blossoms are in full bloom, but many tourists are complaining over poor service facilities.



6. Back to Nature



[Anchor Lead]



The ongoing campaign against school violence in Korea is seeing more and more creative solutions. Now, forest authorities have organized a program to help city kids get back to nature while learning how to communicate.



[Pkg]



A special class is held in a lush forest. Students have fun and learn how to communicate. They also learn how to express their hidden feelings using tree branches, soil and leaves. They share their good and bad memories of how they were hurt by their friends or moved by their warm hearts, and try to understand one another. The purpose of this forest class is to find a solution to rising school violence.



[Soundbite]Choe Gye-yeong (Forest Expounder): “When they learn that previously shaded areas can have blooming flowers when the sun shines again, they realize that they are not alone in this world and that they have their friends.”



The forest authorities plan to expand the program to Daejeon and North Chungcheong Province to prevent school violence.



7. Herb Harvest



[Anchor Lead]



Muju County in North Jeolla Province is known for its pristine nature. Nowadays, the harvest of a medicinal herb is in full swing.



[Pkg]



Women dig for something on Mount Deokyu 500 meters above sea level. They dig about 50 centimeters and then the yellowish herb gastrodia elata appears in the soil. Young gastrodia elata is buried in soil in spring and harvested two years later. The herb grows well even in mountainous areas where temperatures don’t rise above 25 degrees Celsius even in summer. The kind grown in the high-elevation area of Muju is known for its outstanding medicinal effects. The plant is known help alleviate brain and cardiovascular diseases because of antioxidants and substances that improve blood circulation.



[Soundbite]Kim Chang-su (Regional Agri R&E Services): “Gastrodin helps treat cerebrovascular diseases by improving blood circulation. And ergothioneine is an antioxidant that prevents aging.”



Some 300 farms specializing in the herb earn more than 87,000 dollars a year on average thanks to soaring demand for gastrodia elata in urban areas. The medicinal herb is a lucrative revenue source for farmers in Muju.



8. Arirang Exhibit



[Anchor Lead]



A special exhibition featuring various versions of the Korean folk song "Arirang" and related relics has opened at the National Folk Museum in Seoul. Korea is seeking to add the song to the Unesco Intangible Heritage list.



[Pkg]



This elderly woman never forgot the Korean folk song "Arirang" even when she lived away from her home country as a sex slave for Japanese soldiers during World War II. For centuries, the song helped Koreans find solace from hardships, and was always popular at social gatherings. Each province in Korea has its own version of "Arirang." This sheet music for the song "Arirang" was left by an American missionary in 1896. An ancient music book from the Joseon Dynasty says that entertaining troupes called "sadangpae" were invited to the royal court to perform the song. The nation’s first Western-style opera was also based on "Arirang." The show was staged to raise money to buy clothes for independence fighters during the Japanese colonial rule.



This exhibition features some 2,000 domestic and foreign exhibits on Arirang.



[Soundbite]Lee Geon-uk (Researcher, National Folk Museum): “It will show what Arirang means to us and why it has been loved for such a long time.”



Among the exhibited items are daily necessities from the 1960s and 70s, such as matches and accessories. They were all named after the song "Arirang." Next month, Korea will request UNESCO to include "Arirang" in the list of the World Intangible Heritage. The final decision is expected in November this year.



9. Utensil Care



[Anchor Lead]



Kitchen utensils also have a shelf life, but are often used long after they should have been thrown out. Rusty knives, frying pans that have lost their coating and other products can become health hazards if you continue using them for too long.



[Pkg]



We looked into how long people usually use their kitchen utensils.



[Soundbite] “I use pans for dozens of years until the handle is burnt or they become very inconvenient to use.”



[Soundbite] “If you use wash cloths long enough, they tear; I use them up until that point.”



We also found out how long they should be used at most.



[Soundbite]Prof. Jang Chang-gok (Dongduk Women’s University): “Even if they’re sterilized, it’s problematic to use wash cloths or rags for more than a month. Meanwhile, cutting boards can be used for 6 to 12 months.”



When utensils start to break down, they can be harmful to your health. This expert has come to inspect the kitchen of a housewife of 15 years and check out the condition of her utensils. The wash cloth has been used for a year. A contamination gauge shows a pollution index of well over 10,000. It’s put under a microscopic camera for closer observation.



[Soundbite]Lee Hak-tae (Dir., Green Food Safety Research Inst.): “Wash cloths have the moisture and breeding conditions for germs. They should be replaced after being used for 20-30 days.”



This time, it’s the frying pan.



[Soundbite] “I use pans that don’t stick for cooking fried dishes. The sticky ones are used for other purposes; I can’t throw them away.”



We poured the same amount of oil on a new frying pan and a pan that’s been used for five years and began grilling fish. Within around 30 seconds, the fish in the old pan started to stick and smoke.



[Soundbite]Prof. Kim Gyeong-su (Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital): “If you cook food in pans and pots whose coating has come off, harmful substances can leach out. In particular, when acidic ingredients such as meat or glacial acetic acid are cooked in old pans, metal components can ooze out. So for your family’s health, it’s better to throw these pans away.”



Of course, there are ways of managing your kitchen utensils. We followed Song Hye-yeong into her kitchen. She says there’s a simple way to preserve the frying pan coating for a long time.



[Soundbite] “I heard that rather than just rinsing off the water, heating it once more when it’s still wet will help the coating go a long way. So this is how I keep my pans.”



Wash cloths, sponges and scrubbers are particularly susceptible to contamination, so it’s a good idea to have different ones for different uses.



[Soundbite] “I sterilize them once every three days.”



To sanitize your wash cloths, dunk them in warm water with some baking soda and three spoonfuls of vinegar. The acidity will remove the germs. Then, dry them out in the sun. As for knives, if you won’t be using one for a while, put some cooking oil on it before you store it. People worry a lot about how healthy their food is, but utensils are just as important, and require proper care.
  • Election Results
    • 입력 2012-04-12 16:55:31
    News Today
[Anchor Lead]



The ruling Saenuri Party has pulled off an upset in the general elections, winning a parliamentary majority



[Pkg]



The ruling Saenuri Party has won 152 of 300 seats in the National Assembly in an upset victory in the general elections. The main opposition Democratic United Party has 127 seats and the minor United Progressive Party 13. Saenuri has retained its parliamentary majority and also gotten a headstart in future political contests. But the relatively small margin of victory will likely prompt the ruling party to take its opposition rival head on over every major political issue. The main opposition party will probably seek to compensate for its latest defeat by stressing its ideological features. The party is thus predicted to attack the ruling party on all key issues. The main opposition party wants an independent probe or a parliamentary hearing on the suspected illegal surveillance of civilians and corruption scandals surrounding the president’s aides and relatives. But the ruling party is also expected to actively respond to its rival’s offensive. So the political situation should rapidly cool down. The ruling party’s victory has helped ease fears over President Lee Myung-bak becoming a lame duck. Others predict that acting party chief Park Geun-hye will try to distance herself from the incumbent administration to solidify her status as a leading presidential hopeful. In addition, the United Progressive Party has become the No. 3 party in the National Assembly. The party has pledged to take the initiative in political developments.



2. New Voting



[Anchor Lead]



From traditional music performances to photos being shot at the scene, the atmosphere at polling centers was not like it used to be yesterday.



[Pkg]



It’s drizzling outside, but polling centers are full of voters. Many of them have brought their children to show them how to exercise their voting rights. A familiar traditional tune plays at the entrance of this polling center. The performance was organized by a local election commission to encourage the public to vote, and voters seem to like it.



[Soundbite] “The campaign was very fierce and rigid, so it’s good to hear welcoming tunes playing for voters.”



People in their 20s and 30s make sure to take commemorative snapshots at the polling stations. This new tradition is a result of the popularity of smartphones and a new regulation that allows photographing in front of polling stations. Meanwhile, local election commissions were flooded with inquiries on what is allowed and what is banned by the revised Election Law to encourage voting.



3. Painful Costs



[Anchor Lead]



Treating terminally ill patients with little or no chance of recovery costs huge amounts of money every year. A survey has found that an excessive amount is spent on medical costs not long before death.



[Pkg]



This patient with late-stage cancer is unlikely to recover. But she and her family live in pain because they haven’t stopped treatment.



[Soundbite](Family Member): “More and more procedures are added to make it harder; it’s financially difficult.”



A Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service study has analyzed 470,000 patients. Medical costs spent per patient one year before death reached 9,600 U.S. dollars, nine times that spent by an average patient. One cause for this is the high cost of tests and treatment for prolonging life though the possibility of recovery is very low.



[Soundbite]Prof. Lee Su-hui (Korea University Guro Hospital): “Hospitalizing patients in the ICU and giving useless treatment is depriving them of the right to die with dignity, and burdening their families with economic difficulties.”



What the terminally ill need most is not useless treatment to prolong their lives, but palliative care to relieve pain and promote a sense of psychological security. The government will have health insurance cover palliative care such as hospice services.



4. Night Riders



[Anchor Lead]



Cyclists are advised to take extra caution during nighttime rides, as Korean bike paths often lack safety additions like fences and lights.



[Pkg]



Scores of people ride bikes late in the evening. But chances of bumping into obstacles and even people are high in darkness. Many bike paths in Korea lack safety facilities such as fences and lights. The number of cyclists keeps rising in the nation but the lack of safety facilities has resulted in a growing number of accidents. It rose from 7,900 in 2005 to more than 10,000 in 2010. The number of deaths and injuries among cyclists also keeps surging. Some local governments have installed fences equipped with fluorescent lights along bike paths.



[Soundbite] “When safety facilities aren’t in place, I’m reluctant to ride a bike even during the daytime because of the risk of accidents. But now, I feel free to ride at night thanks to the safety facilities.”



Some districts in Seoul have requested the Seoul metropolitan government to install safety facilities along bike paths, but their requests were turned down due to the lack of budget. Installing safety facilities on bike paths is urgent to ensure cyclists’ safety.



5. Festival Flop



[Anchor Lead]



An annual cherry blossom festival in Jinhae, South Gyeongsang Province, is one of the nation’s most popular events in spring. But tourists are complaining about a host of safety and parking problems there.



[Pkg]



People flock to near a railway as a train approaches. Tourists want to take photos of a train passing under a cherry tree heavy with pink blossoms. But a tourist was hit by a train and seriously wounded in last year’s festival. A "no crossing" line serve as the lone safety measure but is almost useless. Roads near spots famous for cherry blossoms have turned into virtual parking lots due to lack of parking facilities. Hundreds of thousands of people visit the cherry blossom festival every day. But existing parking facilities are insufficient. Finding a restroom sign is also hard.



[Soundbite] “They should install parking lots and restrooms before attracting tourists. Now, this isn’t a tourist attraction because of its poor facilities.”



Cherry blossoms are in full bloom, but many tourists are complaining over poor service facilities.



6. Back to Nature



[Anchor Lead]



The ongoing campaign against school violence in Korea is seeing more and more creative solutions. Now, forest authorities have organized a program to help city kids get back to nature while learning how to communicate.



[Pkg]



A special class is held in a lush forest. Students have fun and learn how to communicate. They also learn how to express their hidden feelings using tree branches, soil and leaves. They share their good and bad memories of how they were hurt by their friends or moved by their warm hearts, and try to understand one another. The purpose of this forest class is to find a solution to rising school violence.



[Soundbite]Choe Gye-yeong (Forest Expounder): “When they learn that previously shaded areas can have blooming flowers when the sun shines again, they realize that they are not alone in this world and that they have their friends.”



The forest authorities plan to expand the program to Daejeon and North Chungcheong Province to prevent school violence.



7. Herb Harvest



[Anchor Lead]



Muju County in North Jeolla Province is known for its pristine nature. Nowadays, the harvest of a medicinal herb is in full swing.



[Pkg]



Women dig for something on Mount Deokyu 500 meters above sea level. They dig about 50 centimeters and then the yellowish herb gastrodia elata appears in the soil. Young gastrodia elata is buried in soil in spring and harvested two years later. The herb grows well even in mountainous areas where temperatures don’t rise above 25 degrees Celsius even in summer. The kind grown in the high-elevation area of Muju is known for its outstanding medicinal effects. The plant is known help alleviate brain and cardiovascular diseases because of antioxidants and substances that improve blood circulation.



[Soundbite]Kim Chang-su (Regional Agri R&E Services): “Gastrodin helps treat cerebrovascular diseases by improving blood circulation. And ergothioneine is an antioxidant that prevents aging.”



Some 300 farms specializing in the herb earn more than 87,000 dollars a year on average thanks to soaring demand for gastrodia elata in urban areas. The medicinal herb is a lucrative revenue source for farmers in Muju.



8. Arirang Exhibit



[Anchor Lead]



A special exhibition featuring various versions of the Korean folk song "Arirang" and related relics has opened at the National Folk Museum in Seoul. Korea is seeking to add the song to the Unesco Intangible Heritage list.



[Pkg]



This elderly woman never forgot the Korean folk song "Arirang" even when she lived away from her home country as a sex slave for Japanese soldiers during World War II. For centuries, the song helped Koreans find solace from hardships, and was always popular at social gatherings. Each province in Korea has its own version of "Arirang." This sheet music for the song "Arirang" was left by an American missionary in 1896. An ancient music book from the Joseon Dynasty says that entertaining troupes called "sadangpae" were invited to the royal court to perform the song. The nation’s first Western-style opera was also based on "Arirang." The show was staged to raise money to buy clothes for independence fighters during the Japanese colonial rule.



This exhibition features some 2,000 domestic and foreign exhibits on Arirang.



[Soundbite]Lee Geon-uk (Researcher, National Folk Museum): “It will show what Arirang means to us and why it has been loved for such a long time.”



Among the exhibited items are daily necessities from the 1960s and 70s, such as matches and accessories. They were all named after the song "Arirang." Next month, Korea will request UNESCO to include "Arirang" in the list of the World Intangible Heritage. The final decision is expected in November this year.



9. Utensil Care



[Anchor Lead]



Kitchen utensils also have a shelf life, but are often used long after they should have been thrown out. Rusty knives, frying pans that have lost their coating and other products can become health hazards if you continue using them for too long.



[Pkg]



We looked into how long people usually use their kitchen utensils.



[Soundbite] “I use pans for dozens of years until the handle is burnt or they become very inconvenient to use.”



[Soundbite] “If you use wash cloths long enough, they tear; I use them up until that point.”



We also found out how long they should be used at most.



[Soundbite]Prof. Jang Chang-gok (Dongduk Women’s University): “Even if they’re sterilized, it’s problematic to use wash cloths or rags for more than a month. Meanwhile, cutting boards can be used for 6 to 12 months.”



When utensils start to break down, they can be harmful to your health. This expert has come to inspect the kitchen of a housewife of 15 years and check out the condition of her utensils. The wash cloth has been used for a year. A contamination gauge shows a pollution index of well over 10,000. It’s put under a microscopic camera for closer observation.



[Soundbite]Lee Hak-tae (Dir., Green Food Safety Research Inst.): “Wash cloths have the moisture and breeding conditions for germs. They should be replaced after being used for 20-30 days.”



This time, it’s the frying pan.



[Soundbite] “I use pans that don’t stick for cooking fried dishes. The sticky ones are used for other purposes; I can’t throw them away.”



We poured the same amount of oil on a new frying pan and a pan that’s been used for five years and began grilling fish. Within around 30 seconds, the fish in the old pan started to stick and smoke.



[Soundbite]Prof. Kim Gyeong-su (Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital): “If you cook food in pans and pots whose coating has come off, harmful substances can leach out. In particular, when acidic ingredients such as meat or glacial acetic acid are cooked in old pans, metal components can ooze out. So for your family’s health, it’s better to throw these pans away.”



Of course, there are ways of managing your kitchen utensils. We followed Song Hye-yeong into her kitchen. She says there’s a simple way to preserve the frying pan coating for a long time.



[Soundbite] “I heard that rather than just rinsing off the water, heating it once more when it’s still wet will help the coating go a long way. So this is how I keep my pans.”



Wash cloths, sponges and scrubbers are particularly susceptible to contamination, so it’s a good idea to have different ones for different uses.



[Soundbite] “I sterilize them once every three days.”



To sanitize your wash cloths, dunk them in warm water with some baking soda and three spoonfuls of vinegar. The acidity will remove the germs. Then, dry them out in the sun. As for knives, if you won’t be using one for a while, put some cooking oil on it before you store it. People worry a lot about how healthy their food is, but utensils are just as important, and require proper care.
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