기사 본문 영역

상세페이지

Cargo Strike
입력 2012.06.25 (16:14) News Today
자동재생
동영상영역 시작
동영상영역 끝
[Anchor Lead]

The Korean Cargo Workers' Union has launched a strike. The government is saying the move is illegal, and has threatened to punish the drivers for obstructing operations.

[Pkg]

The Korean Cargo Workers' Union, part of the Korean Confederation of Trade Unions, has launched a strike for the first time in four years. The union is demanding that the government enact legislation on the freight workers' standard wages, as currently cargo workers mostly work as temporary employees and receive wages that are lower than the nation's minimum wage. The union is also demanding that shipping costs be raised 30 percent as soon as possible and that the government supply cargo workers with tax exemptions for petrol, as fuel costs account for about 60 percent of shipping costs. The government says it would be difficult to legislate transportation costs for self-employed freight-truck drivers. Shippers also say that the workers' demand to raise shipping costs by 30 percent is excessive. The government has decided to expand railway and marine transportation, and deploy military container vehicles if necessary, as well as allow the operation of freight trucks for personal use. The government has also vowed to suspend fuel subsidies in the next six months for cargo workers who participate in the strike, and punish them strictly for obstructing cargo operations. The government is also to dispatch police troops to the major logistics points to ensure smooth shipping, and compensate owners of freight trucks that become damaged during the strike.

2. Columbia Visit

[Anchor Lead]

Today marks the 62nd anniversary of the beginning of the Korean War. As President Lee Myung-bak is currently in Latin America on a state visit, he has extended his gratitude Colombian veterans who fought for South Korea.

[Pkg]

President Lee Myung-hak arrived in Colombia on a state visit on Sunday, a day ahead of the 62nd anniversary of the Korean War. As his first schedule in Colombia, Lee visited a monument marking the participation of Colombian soldiers in the Korean War. He paid his tributes to the Colombian forces who have lost their lives during the war. Colombia is the only Latin American country that sent forces to South Korea for the Korean War. It dispatched 5,300 soldiers to the Korean Peninsula. Of them, more than 200 Colombian soldiers were killed in the war. The South Korean president invited Colombian veterans and their families to a dinner and expressed his gratitude to Colombia for the sacrifices it made for a country half a world away six decades ago.

[Soundbite]Lee Myung-bak (President): “I extend gratitude to you in the name of all South Korean people. We will never forget you and will appreciate your sacrifice forever.”

With tears in their eyes, grey-haired Colombian veterans are surprised by the economic development South Korea has achieved.

[Soundbite]Hernando Gomez (President, Association of Colombian Veterans): “While fighting in the Korean War, I never thought South Korea could be reborn as a strong country.”

Since taking office in 2008, Lee has visited 13 out of the 16 countries that had sent their soldiers and other types of assistance to South Korea during the Korean War. The tour by the presidents of South Korea of its allies from the Korean War has been virtually completed 59 years after a truce was signed.

3. Forgotten Heros

[Anchor Lead]

Poor government support for former soldiers who fought in the Korean War means that some veterans and their families have a tough time making ends meet.

[Pkg]

This is the home in Jeju City of a couple who had both fought in the Korean War as soldiers. Kim Gyeong-nam, who was born in Pyongyang, had defected to the South in 1951 when the Korean War was at its peak and joined the South Korean Army, eventually being awarded the Order of Military Merit Hwarang. His wife Kim Ye-sun, who had been a middle school student quit her studies in 1950 and also voluntarily joined the navy to fight for her country. After the war, the couple worked as school teachers but due to their son's failed business, they had to give up their pension and live in a difficult situation having to take care of their three grandchildren as well.

[Soundbite]Kim Gyeong-nam (Korean War Veteran): “I have no abilities to do any economic activities and I’m also ill; I had a stroke.”

Currently, disabled Korean War veterans and those who have been awarded Orders of Military Merit do receive National Merit benefits. But other general veterans only receive honorary allowances of around 78 U.S. dollars and a 60 percent exemption of medical costs at the Korea Veterans Hospital. As a result, a large number of veterans are economically distressed. Substantial support is urgent from the country and local governments for such forgotten veterans living in poverty and neglect.

4. Niche Banks

[Anchor Lead]

As the competition among banks continues to intensify, banks have begun targeting niche markets.

[Pkg]

This smart branch of one of the nation's banks has recently opened in a university area. Instead of clerks, the branch is all automated with touch screens. Customers can open bank accounts and receive credit cards at their own convenience. The branch site has only two staff workers, who help the customers go through the authorization process. Those who need to receive consultations on money deposits and loans can do so via conference calls.

[Soundbite] “I have no problems using such touch screens because I'm used to using my smartphone; I find it very convenient.”

Another bank has opened a branch inside a makeshift container at a construction site in a satellite town. Such bank branches can be opened in just a week even in areas of land development and sites that have been hit by disasters. What's more, they can be relocated easily.

[Soundbite]Kim Seok-gun (KB Bank): “Even when the operation period expires, we can recycle them any time we want to move the container somewhere else.”

Meanwhile, the number of public phone booths with bank ATMs attached has surpassed 600 this year. Banks will likely come up with more ingenuous ideas to lure in customers while cutting costs as competition among these financial institutions keeps intensifying.

5. ID Theft

[Anchor Lead]

Prosecutors have caught over 100 Korean Chinese who were once deported from Korea for committing crimes but managed to enter the country again with false identities. Many of them even got citizenship.

[Pkg]

When a photo of a man is inserted in a facial recognition device, the image of another, similar-looking person appears. This Korean Chinese man identified by his family name Kim raped a woman in a bar and was expelled from Korea back in 2003. Kim's facial features coincide completely with the image of the criminal. Prosecutors have caught 130 Chinese Koreans, 114 of whom have already acquired Korean citizenships, while some 20 others have serious criminal records, including sexual crimes and burglary. The criminals capitalized on the fact that forging residents' registration is easy in China because of poor computer technologies.

[Soundbite]Jeong Jeum-sik (Assistant Prosecutor, SPO): “They paid 4-5 million won (US$3,400-4,300) to brokers in China to forge their resident registrations and re-enter Korea.”

Prosecutors were able to catch the criminals by comparing the facial features of Korean Chinese who entered the country in the first half of 2007 with the images of criminals who were expelled from Korea. The prosecutors plan to expand the investigation to all Korean Chinese arriving in the nation as well as to foreigners of other nationalities, as they can also include similar cases.

6. Eye Surgery

[Anchor Lead]

Due to the excessive use of computers and mobile devices, presbyopia, which makes it difficult to see objects up close, is occurring earlier and earlier. A surgery similar to lasik has been adopted to deal with the condition.

[Pkg]

This woman in her 50s had received surgery for presbyopia two months ago and now does not have to wear reading glasses. She has no trouble reading the newspaper without the use of her eyeglasses.

[Soundbite] “I'm so happy I don’t have to wear glasses anymore. They were heavy and looked dumb, but I can see well now.”

This 49 year old woman had also received presbyopic surgery and can see both near and far quite clearly.

With age, the lenses and muscles in the eye lose their elasticity, which makes it difficult to see things clearly at a close distance. Recently, lasik has been applied to treat presbyopia.

[Soundbite]Dr. Lee Jong-ho (Ophthalmologist): “It’s the same as lasik, where the cornea is corrected, so your eye can focus on things nearby, midway and far away.”

Both nearsightedness and farsightedness can be corrected by reshaping the center and peripheral parts of the cornea. The strong point for the lasik surgery for this condition is the fact that the results are immediate, allowing the patient to see clearly right after the operation. However, the effect is not permanent as presbyopia continues to develop with age, causing the effects to gradually disappear in about a decade.

7. Farm Jobs

[Anchor Lead]

Many farms have trouble finding enough workers these days. A new business connecting farms that need hands and city people who need jobs is receiving a good response.

[Pkg]

Workers busily harvest onions. The farm owner had been worried just a few days ago due to a lack of workers but was relieved after having workers sent by the local district office. The workers sent to the farm to harvest onions are all 50 or 60 something women living in the town of Gimcheon.

[Soundbite] “At least, it's better than doing nothing. I can help farms and also help my household.”

About 20 percent of Gimcheon's population are farmers. It was last year that the city government launched this business connecting farmers and city working hands. During the farming season from April through November, farmers who need working hands can receive connections to city people looking for work. The local government even provides vehicles and accident insurance for the hired workers.

[Soundbite]Seok Seong-dae (Gimcheon City Official): “Excessive work hands in the city are supplied to farms lacking hands, creating a win-win result.”

Recently, other nearby local governments have been making field trips to learn Gimcheon's know-how in connecting the city and farm villages.

8. School Forest

[Anchor Lead]

A study shows that students from schools situated in forested areas have better concentration and cognitive skills.

[Pkg]

As soon as school is over, students run to the woods, which the school has had for nearly 13 years. The children have fun running and playing in nature’s surroundings. At the pond, they can observe animals and plants.

A study conducted on the students from schools where woods account for about 20 percent of the campus grounds showed that they scored up to 3.5 points higher in terms of concentration, learning aptitude and curiosity than their peers from schools without natural surroundings.

[Soundbite]Ha Si-yeon (Korea Forest Research Institute): “Physical environmental factors like anion and phytoncide may help them regain emotional stability.”

The woods at school are basically the only chance for these children from big cities to experience nature. However, as the lack of space and budget remain big challenges, only slightly over 8 percent of all of the schools in the nation, which is about 900 educational institutions, have woods and natural surroundings available for their students.

9. Easy Gardening

[Anchor Lead]

Growing vegetables at home seems easy, but there are a few tricks that you need to know. Today we’ll take a look at some city vegetable gardens that just might inspire you to make one of your own.

[Pkg]One of the homemakers living in this apartment building is known for her gardening skills.

[Soundbite] “There are no pots here. But in my garden, there are 120.”

There are 120 pots in her garden, piled up on top of each other. They can be easily turned to ensure that all the plants get enough water and sunshine.

[Soundbite] “I'm a lazy person. But since they get enough sunlight, they grow well even when I don't take good care of them.”

When the plant at the very top is watered, the water flows down to the pots below. She uses her own fresh vegetables straight from the garden to make salads and sandwiches.

[Soundbite] “I used to be very chubby. But I’ve lost more than 10 kg because I eat salads for breakfast. It seems my diet has succeeded.”

This family also grows vegetables at home. All these fresh veggies on the table are their crops. Plants in the study room grow well even without natural sunlight thanks to LED lights.

[Soundbite] “The monthly electricity charge for this is just 3,500 won (US$3). And it's enough to turn it on for 14 hours a day; it’s very good.”

Watering is also easy.

[Soundbite] “The wick helps (the water) spread evenly in the pot, which makes it easier to grow the plants. I only have to remember once a week.”

This wick is one of the garden’s tricks.

[Soundbite]Mun Ji-hye (Rural Development Administration): “The wick sucks up water from the water bucket and supplies it to the bed soil. Water should only be given once every 7-10 days or even once a month, depending on the size of the bucket.”

This garden was created for the people who live in this complex on the rooftop of the management office. These veggies are growing in boxes.

[Soundbite] “We were given these boxes free of charge so that city residents like us can try gardening.”

Such box gardens are supplied by the local government free of charge.

[Soundbite] “It's not difficult at all. This is a box garden. And this is a hole for putting in water, and this is a prop. When water is put in here, the wick inside the box soaks it up. So watering is very easy.”

The plants are easy to cultivate because they don't need to be watered every day. The residents say they enjoy gardening together because it helps them eat healthy and bond as well.

[Soundbite] “By having meals together, we’re growing closer. We didn't get together often, but now we have a good excuse to do that.”

With the right pots and a little bit of creativity, home gardening can be easy and fun.
  • Cargo Strike
    • 입력 2012-06-25 16:14:59
    News Today
[Anchor Lead]

The Korean Cargo Workers' Union has launched a strike. The government is saying the move is illegal, and has threatened to punish the drivers for obstructing operations.

[Pkg]

The Korean Cargo Workers' Union, part of the Korean Confederation of Trade Unions, has launched a strike for the first time in four years. The union is demanding that the government enact legislation on the freight workers' standard wages, as currently cargo workers mostly work as temporary employees and receive wages that are lower than the nation's minimum wage. The union is also demanding that shipping costs be raised 30 percent as soon as possible and that the government supply cargo workers with tax exemptions for petrol, as fuel costs account for about 60 percent of shipping costs. The government says it would be difficult to legislate transportation costs for self-employed freight-truck drivers. Shippers also say that the workers' demand to raise shipping costs by 30 percent is excessive. The government has decided to expand railway and marine transportation, and deploy military container vehicles if necessary, as well as allow the operation of freight trucks for personal use. The government has also vowed to suspend fuel subsidies in the next six months for cargo workers who participate in the strike, and punish them strictly for obstructing cargo operations. The government is also to dispatch police troops to the major logistics points to ensure smooth shipping, and compensate owners of freight trucks that become damaged during the strike.

2. Columbia Visit

[Anchor Lead]

Today marks the 62nd anniversary of the beginning of the Korean War. As President Lee Myung-bak is currently in Latin America on a state visit, he has extended his gratitude Colombian veterans who fought for South Korea.

[Pkg]

President Lee Myung-hak arrived in Colombia on a state visit on Sunday, a day ahead of the 62nd anniversary of the Korean War. As his first schedule in Colombia, Lee visited a monument marking the participation of Colombian soldiers in the Korean War. He paid his tributes to the Colombian forces who have lost their lives during the war. Colombia is the only Latin American country that sent forces to South Korea for the Korean War. It dispatched 5,300 soldiers to the Korean Peninsula. Of them, more than 200 Colombian soldiers were killed in the war. The South Korean president invited Colombian veterans and their families to a dinner and expressed his gratitude to Colombia for the sacrifices it made for a country half a world away six decades ago.

[Soundbite]Lee Myung-bak (President): “I extend gratitude to you in the name of all South Korean people. We will never forget you and will appreciate your sacrifice forever.”

With tears in their eyes, grey-haired Colombian veterans are surprised by the economic development South Korea has achieved.

[Soundbite]Hernando Gomez (President, Association of Colombian Veterans): “While fighting in the Korean War, I never thought South Korea could be reborn as a strong country.”

Since taking office in 2008, Lee has visited 13 out of the 16 countries that had sent their soldiers and other types of assistance to South Korea during the Korean War. The tour by the presidents of South Korea of its allies from the Korean War has been virtually completed 59 years after a truce was signed.

3. Forgotten Heros

[Anchor Lead]

Poor government support for former soldiers who fought in the Korean War means that some veterans and their families have a tough time making ends meet.

[Pkg]

This is the home in Jeju City of a couple who had both fought in the Korean War as soldiers. Kim Gyeong-nam, who was born in Pyongyang, had defected to the South in 1951 when the Korean War was at its peak and joined the South Korean Army, eventually being awarded the Order of Military Merit Hwarang. His wife Kim Ye-sun, who had been a middle school student quit her studies in 1950 and also voluntarily joined the navy to fight for her country. After the war, the couple worked as school teachers but due to their son's failed business, they had to give up their pension and live in a difficult situation having to take care of their three grandchildren as well.

[Soundbite]Kim Gyeong-nam (Korean War Veteran): “I have no abilities to do any economic activities and I’m also ill; I had a stroke.”

Currently, disabled Korean War veterans and those who have been awarded Orders of Military Merit do receive National Merit benefits. But other general veterans only receive honorary allowances of around 78 U.S. dollars and a 60 percent exemption of medical costs at the Korea Veterans Hospital. As a result, a large number of veterans are economically distressed. Substantial support is urgent from the country and local governments for such forgotten veterans living in poverty and neglect.

4. Niche Banks

[Anchor Lead]

As the competition among banks continues to intensify, banks have begun targeting niche markets.

[Pkg]

This smart branch of one of the nation's banks has recently opened in a university area. Instead of clerks, the branch is all automated with touch screens. Customers can open bank accounts and receive credit cards at their own convenience. The branch site has only two staff workers, who help the customers go through the authorization process. Those who need to receive consultations on money deposits and loans can do so via conference calls.

[Soundbite] “I have no problems using such touch screens because I'm used to using my smartphone; I find it very convenient.”

Another bank has opened a branch inside a makeshift container at a construction site in a satellite town. Such bank branches can be opened in just a week even in areas of land development and sites that have been hit by disasters. What's more, they can be relocated easily.

[Soundbite]Kim Seok-gun (KB Bank): “Even when the operation period expires, we can recycle them any time we want to move the container somewhere else.”

Meanwhile, the number of public phone booths with bank ATMs attached has surpassed 600 this year. Banks will likely come up with more ingenuous ideas to lure in customers while cutting costs as competition among these financial institutions keeps intensifying.

5. ID Theft

[Anchor Lead]

Prosecutors have caught over 100 Korean Chinese who were once deported from Korea for committing crimes but managed to enter the country again with false identities. Many of them even got citizenship.

[Pkg]

When a photo of a man is inserted in a facial recognition device, the image of another, similar-looking person appears. This Korean Chinese man identified by his family name Kim raped a woman in a bar and was expelled from Korea back in 2003. Kim's facial features coincide completely with the image of the criminal. Prosecutors have caught 130 Chinese Koreans, 114 of whom have already acquired Korean citizenships, while some 20 others have serious criminal records, including sexual crimes and burglary. The criminals capitalized on the fact that forging residents' registration is easy in China because of poor computer technologies.

[Soundbite]Jeong Jeum-sik (Assistant Prosecutor, SPO): “They paid 4-5 million won (US$3,400-4,300) to brokers in China to forge their resident registrations and re-enter Korea.”

Prosecutors were able to catch the criminals by comparing the facial features of Korean Chinese who entered the country in the first half of 2007 with the images of criminals who were expelled from Korea. The prosecutors plan to expand the investigation to all Korean Chinese arriving in the nation as well as to foreigners of other nationalities, as they can also include similar cases.

6. Eye Surgery

[Anchor Lead]

Due to the excessive use of computers and mobile devices, presbyopia, which makes it difficult to see objects up close, is occurring earlier and earlier. A surgery similar to lasik has been adopted to deal with the condition.

[Pkg]

This woman in her 50s had received surgery for presbyopia two months ago and now does not have to wear reading glasses. She has no trouble reading the newspaper without the use of her eyeglasses.

[Soundbite] “I'm so happy I don’t have to wear glasses anymore. They were heavy and looked dumb, but I can see well now.”

This 49 year old woman had also received presbyopic surgery and can see both near and far quite clearly.

With age, the lenses and muscles in the eye lose their elasticity, which makes it difficult to see things clearly at a close distance. Recently, lasik has been applied to treat presbyopia.

[Soundbite]Dr. Lee Jong-ho (Ophthalmologist): “It’s the same as lasik, where the cornea is corrected, so your eye can focus on things nearby, midway and far away.”

Both nearsightedness and farsightedness can be corrected by reshaping the center and peripheral parts of the cornea. The strong point for the lasik surgery for this condition is the fact that the results are immediate, allowing the patient to see clearly right after the operation. However, the effect is not permanent as presbyopia continues to develop with age, causing the effects to gradually disappear in about a decade.

7. Farm Jobs

[Anchor Lead]

Many farms have trouble finding enough workers these days. A new business connecting farms that need hands and city people who need jobs is receiving a good response.

[Pkg]

Workers busily harvest onions. The farm owner had been worried just a few days ago due to a lack of workers but was relieved after having workers sent by the local district office. The workers sent to the farm to harvest onions are all 50 or 60 something women living in the town of Gimcheon.

[Soundbite] “At least, it's better than doing nothing. I can help farms and also help my household.”

About 20 percent of Gimcheon's population are farmers. It was last year that the city government launched this business connecting farmers and city working hands. During the farming season from April through November, farmers who need working hands can receive connections to city people looking for work. The local government even provides vehicles and accident insurance for the hired workers.

[Soundbite]Seok Seong-dae (Gimcheon City Official): “Excessive work hands in the city are supplied to farms lacking hands, creating a win-win result.”

Recently, other nearby local governments have been making field trips to learn Gimcheon's know-how in connecting the city and farm villages.

8. School Forest

[Anchor Lead]

A study shows that students from schools situated in forested areas have better concentration and cognitive skills.

[Pkg]

As soon as school is over, students run to the woods, which the school has had for nearly 13 years. The children have fun running and playing in nature’s surroundings. At the pond, they can observe animals and plants.

A study conducted on the students from schools where woods account for about 20 percent of the campus grounds showed that they scored up to 3.5 points higher in terms of concentration, learning aptitude and curiosity than their peers from schools without natural surroundings.

[Soundbite]Ha Si-yeon (Korea Forest Research Institute): “Physical environmental factors like anion and phytoncide may help them regain emotional stability.”

The woods at school are basically the only chance for these children from big cities to experience nature. However, as the lack of space and budget remain big challenges, only slightly over 8 percent of all of the schools in the nation, which is about 900 educational institutions, have woods and natural surroundings available for their students.

9. Easy Gardening

[Anchor Lead]

Growing vegetables at home seems easy, but there are a few tricks that you need to know. Today we’ll take a look at some city vegetable gardens that just might inspire you to make one of your own.

[Pkg]One of the homemakers living in this apartment building is known for her gardening skills.

[Soundbite] “There are no pots here. But in my garden, there are 120.”

There are 120 pots in her garden, piled up on top of each other. They can be easily turned to ensure that all the plants get enough water and sunshine.

[Soundbite] “I'm a lazy person. But since they get enough sunlight, they grow well even when I don't take good care of them.”

When the plant at the very top is watered, the water flows down to the pots below. She uses her own fresh vegetables straight from the garden to make salads and sandwiches.

[Soundbite] “I used to be very chubby. But I’ve lost more than 10 kg because I eat salads for breakfast. It seems my diet has succeeded.”

This family also grows vegetables at home. All these fresh veggies on the table are their crops. Plants in the study room grow well even without natural sunlight thanks to LED lights.

[Soundbite] “The monthly electricity charge for this is just 3,500 won (US$3). And it's enough to turn it on for 14 hours a day; it’s very good.”

Watering is also easy.

[Soundbite] “The wick helps (the water) spread evenly in the pot, which makes it easier to grow the plants. I only have to remember once a week.”

This wick is one of the garden’s tricks.

[Soundbite]Mun Ji-hye (Rural Development Administration): “The wick sucks up water from the water bucket and supplies it to the bed soil. Water should only be given once every 7-10 days or even once a month, depending on the size of the bucket.”

This garden was created for the people who live in this complex on the rooftop of the management office. These veggies are growing in boxes.

[Soundbite] “We were given these boxes free of charge so that city residents like us can try gardening.”

Such box gardens are supplied by the local government free of charge.

[Soundbite] “It's not difficult at all. This is a box garden. And this is a hole for putting in water, and this is a prop. When water is put in here, the wick inside the box soaks it up. So watering is very easy.”

The plants are easy to cultivate because they don't need to be watered every day. The residents say they enjoy gardening together because it helps them eat healthy and bond as well.

[Soundbite] “By having meals together, we’re growing closer. We didn't get together often, but now we have a good excuse to do that.”

With the right pots and a little bit of creativity, home gardening can be easy and fun.
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