기사 본문 영역

상세페이지

Probe Raids
입력 2012.10.18 (17:33) News Today
자동재생
동영상영역 시작
동영상영역 끝
[Anchor Lead]

The independent counsel investigating the scandal surrounding President Lee Myung-bak’s cancelled retirement home project has raided the homes of key figures in the scandal including the president’s brother and son.

[Pkg]

On Thursday, the independent counsel that was assigned to investigate President Lee's now-scrapped retirement home project summoned former presidential security service staff member, Kim Tae-hwan, for investigation. Kim is a key figure regarding the retirement home project. He selected the Naegok-dong retirement home site and land for security facilities and signed the contract for around US$ 4,887,000 with the original owner known as Yoo. Furthermore, Kim was in charge of the paperwork for purchasing the same items for the two former presidents, Kim Dae-jung and Roh Moo-hyun. The independent counsel is expected to inquire why Kim, after the purhase, divided up the stakes of the home and security site all at once, unlike with the other former presidents, and if he ever intended to give any of the profits to President Lee's family. The counsel is also tracing bank accounts owned by President Lee's older brother and chairman of DAS Corporation Lee Sang-eun and the president's son Lee Si-hyung.

[Soundbite] Lee Chang-hun (Independent Council Assistant) : "We received search and seizure warrants for bank accounts of those involved including Lee Si-hyung."

In a written reply to the prosecutors, Lee Si-hyung stated that he borrowed a total of around US$ 1,086,000. He received half from a bank by mortgaging the land owned by first lady Kim Yoon-ok, and the remaining half came from his uncle Lee Sang-eun. The independent counsel is closely investigating where the money Si-hyung borrowed from Lee Sang-eun came from. After analyzing the seized articles, the counsel is planning to summon more of those involved for further investigation.

2. Prison Time

[Anchor Lead]

Five high-ranking officials from the prime minister's office have been given prison sentences in the wake of an illegal civilian surveillance scandal.

[Pkg]

When the Civil Service Ethics Division under the Prime Minister's Office was launched in 2008, the scope of its authority and goals was not clearly defined. People subject to illegal surveillance ranged from ordinary people to key figures from the political and business sectors, such as former Supreme Court Chief Justice Lee Yong-hoon and Samsung Group Chairman Lee Kun-hee. More than 500 cases of civilian surveillance were conducted over a period of two years. But those involved in the civilian surveillance scandal were indicted for only three of the cases, and the court upheld most of the charges against them. Former Vice Economy Minister Park Young-joon, a heavyweight in the surveillance scandal, was sentenced to two years in prison. The court also slapped him with a 172,000 U.S. dollar fine. Former presidential secretary Lee Young-ho has received a prison term of two and a half years. The former chief of the Civil Service Ethics Division, Lee In-kyu, was sentenced to a year in prison. He was arrested in court immediately after the verdict was announced. The former official of the Civil Service Ethics Division Jin Kyung-rak also received a sentence for a year behind bars, while the former presidential official Choi Jong-seok was sentenced to 10 months in jail.

[Soundbite] Jo Won-gyeong (Spokesman, Seoul Central District Court) : "The heavy punishment is intended to hold accountable officials who abused their power to violating citizens' basic rights and to prevent similar crimes from recurring in the future."

Although those responsible were finally punished, the victims of the illegal surveillance face numerous obstacles as they try to get compensation. One of the victims, Kim Jong-ik, has been jobless for nearly four years now. He has also recently contracted cancer. Even though a massive amount of evidence that had been gathered against the high-ranking Cheong Wa Dae officials involved in the scandal was presented over the course of 29 trials, the court has never issued a verdict on their wrongdoings.

3. Political Battles

[Anchor Lead]

The ruling and opposition parties are escalating their battles over presidential candidate Park Geun-hye’s involvement with a controversial scholarship foundation and former President Roh Moo-hyun’s alleged remarks on the invalidity of the western inter-Korean sea border.

[Pkg]

The ruling Saenuri Party urged the main opposition DUP presidential candidate Moon Jae-in to reveal if the minutes of the 2007 summit between former President Roh Moo-hyun and then North Korean leader Kim Jong-il, were repealed at Roh’s order. Moon served as chief of staff for the former president and the head of a task force that prepared for the inter-Korean summit. The ruling party also adopted a resolution urging the revelation and a parliamentary probe into allegations that the former president made on the nullification of the Northern Limit Line in the Yellow Sea. The main opposition party presidential candidate refuted the ruling party's claim, which he referred to as a baseless, negative campaign tactic against him. Moon reported Saenuri Party Representative Chung Mun-hun to the prosecution on charges of spreading false information. Chung is the first person who raised suspicion about the former president's NLL remarks. Meanwhile, the Democratic United Party (DUP) is pushing for a parliamentary probe and hearing on the Jeongsu Scholarship Foundation's decision to cash in its share in Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation'. The station made the decision in a meeting with the foundation. The main opposition party attacked Saenuri Party presidential candidate Park Geun-hye after unveiling a record of phone calls between Park and the foundation. They criticized her for denying her involvement. The Saenuri Party said that the calls were made to find out if the media reports on the foundation were true. The ruling party also raised suspicions that the DUP illegally tapped into and took pictures of its presidential candidate. Park said that she will soon disclose her position on the scholarship foundation. Park's latest remarks are a far cry from her previous position that she had nothing to do with the foundation. It remains to be seen whether Park will drastically change her position on this issue.

4. Korea-Africa Forum

[Anchor Lead]

The third Korea-Africa Forum was held in Seoul on Wednesday, where African countries sought to learn lessons from Korea's rapid economic development. Strengthened bilateral cooperation in developing resources was also agreed upon.

[Pkg]

A huge exploration in search of natural gas takes place in waters 80 kilometers northeast off of the coast of Mozambique. It is estimated that one-point-one billion tons of natural gas is buried in the region. As a participant in the exploration project, the Korea Gas Corporation has secured enough natural gas that can satisfy Korea's consumption for three years. Smartphones that are made in Korea are popular in Nairobi, Kenya’s capital city. Until recently, the African smartphone market has been dominated by Japan and China. But Korean companies have been increasing their share in the market by introducing their line of cutting-edge smartphones. In the third Korea-Africa Forum held in Seoul on Wednesday, Korea and member nations in the Africa Union Commission discussed measures to boost mutual exchanges and strengthen bilateral cooperation in developing resources and building social overhead capital.

[Soundbite] Kim Hwang-sik (Prime Minister) : "We have advanced technology and the experience of achieving rapid economic growth and Africa contains great potential, like a rough gemstone. If we cooperate and share these strengths, I firmly believe that we can open up a harmonious and prosperous future."

Representatives from African countries have paid keen interest to Korea's achievement of rapid economic development. Africa’s current per-capita gross national income is at a similar level to Korea’s figure recorded back in the 1960s. The Korean government plans to double its aid to Africa from the current 200 million dollars by 2015 in a way to expand exchanges and cooperation with the continent.

5. Living Apart

[Anchor Lead]

A survey has shown that one in ten married couples in Korea live apart on weekdays due to work or their children's education. Concerns are rising that such living situations could affect the strength of the nation’s families.

[Pkg]

Lee Jong-min works for a large corporation in Seoul. His wife lives in Daejeon, where she works as an elementary school teacher. The couple only gets to meet on weekends, and neither side is willing to give up work to live together. About one 1.15 million spouses across the nation live separately. That’s nearly 600,000 married couples that don’t live together. The number has doubled over the past decade. This is due to the growing number of households that are finding jobs in regions far from where they live, and also because both spouses are working. Another reason is because the growing numbers of couples want their children to study in large cities. However, living apart can take a toll on family bonds. Some couples also postpone pregnancy due to the financial burden associated with maintaining two separate homes. This could also hamper having a vibrant society.

[Soundbite] Kim Jeong-geun (Samsung Economic Research Inst.) : "The increase of spouses living separately is a concern as the nation's birth rate stays low. It can also weaken matrimonial bonds leading to divorce and broken families."

Family members of some 330,000 households throughout the nation also live overseas to work or study.

6. ABU Wraps Up

[Anchor Lead]

The Asia-Pacific Broadcasting Union General Assembly finished up its run in Seoul on Wednesday. At the final event, participants discussed ways to promote TV broadcasting in the age of new media.

[Pkg]

A mock music video showing Asia-Pacific Broadcasting Union executives dancing to the song "Gangnam Style" instantly livens up the venue of the Asia-Pacific Broadcasting Union General Assembly. "Gangnam Style" was able to become an international hit thanks to its popularity on YouTube and Facebook.

[Soundbite] Rachel Payne (Principal, Google Global Strategic Alliances Dept.)

The issue of how to innovate TV broadcasting in the age of new media, where the boundaries of time and space are becoming increasingly blurred, topped the agenda at this year's ABU General Assembly. The participants agreed that although television remains an influential medium for the public, television broadcasts should find ways to coexist with new media rather than compete with it. The participants came to a conclusion, noting that while the public's solid trust in television is essential, it’s about time to come up with ways to utilize mobile devices and social networking sites in conjunction with television broadcasts. This year's ABU General Assembly, which was held in Seoul under the theme "Beyond the Wave," finished its eight-day run on Wednesday.

7. Outlet Fires

[Anchor Lead]

Two children have died in a fire that broke out in a house in Suwon, Gyeonggi Province, on Wednesday. Investigators believe the fire began because of an overtaxed outlet.

[Pkg]

A six and three-year-old child died in a fire that occurred in a multi-family residential building. The fire started with a computer in a room. Several home appliances, such as a computer, recharger and an electric mat, were simultaneously plugged in a multiple socket outlet. Police and firefighters sent the melted outlet and electric wires to the National Forensic Service to find out the exact cause of the fire. An overloaded multiple-socket outlet also started a fire in a flat in Seoul. It was plugged in with several electric devices, and the resident left his home without switching it off.

[Soundbite] Kim Guk-yeong (Korea Electrical Safety Corp.) : "Multiple socket outlets are portable and capacities must not be exceeded. Electric devices must be unplugged when not in use."

With the cold weather approaching, people are advised to take extra precautions and use home appliances in a safer manner.

8. Anti-Crime Designs

[Anchor Lead]

Dark alleys at night often make people nervous about being the victim of a crime. Now, a new campaign is seeking to put minds at rest and prevent such attacks.

[Pkg]

Residents are reluctant to walk alone in this dark alley at night. As a woman presses an emergency button on a street lamppost, people come out of their houses to see what problem had set off the alarm. People in danger can seek help at homes marked with yellow doors, which is where designated civilian guards live. Surveillance cameras were also installed in the area. While taking a walk or jogging, residents naturally monitor what is happening in their neighborhood’s dark alleyways. Anti-crime signs have been posted to deter criminals.

[Soundbite] Prof. Pyo Chang-won (Korea National Police University) : "They’re seen to prevent at least 20 to 80 percent of crimes in many areas."

Anti-crime signs have been also posted to prevent school violence. A remote corner has turned into a playground for students. Monitors were installed at the school’s entrance, allowing everyone to see what is going on at any location on campus at any time. The Seoul metropolitan government plans to apply the trial project’s anti-crime measures to more regions next year based on their effects in the tested areas.

9. Cutting Meals

[Anchor Lead]

With the social pressures to stay slim especially strong in Korea, many fad diets come and go. These days, it’s the one-meal-a-day diet that’s drawing the most attention.

[Pkg]

Most people stick to the traditional three meals a day.

[Soundbite] "I eat all three meals."

[Soundbite] "I need to eat rice. It's a big deal, if I don't get my meals."

But these days, some dieters are cutting out two of their meals in a bid to shed some weight.

[Soundbite] Jeon Seong-sil (Elementary School Teacher) : "I only eat once a day so I skip lunch and have dinner. I was hungry at first but now I'm not."

Jeon Seong-sil, an elementary school teacher, started the one-meal-a-day plan three weeks ago.

[Soundbite] Jeong Hyo-jin (Jeon’s Co-worker) : "When he met a couple of his friends, he ate a full box of ramyeon. He always enjoyed eating meat."

Jeon didn't have the best eating habits before. He’s noticed some changes after cutting back on food.

[Soundbite] "I had a lot of heat in my head area and boils and pimples grew on my face but much of them are gone now. I feel my stomach has shrunk and I can't eat a lot now."

His weight has also gone down. We also spoke to 81-year-old traditional medicine doctor Byeon Jeong-hwan. He only eats once a day and only has a bowl of brown rice with a few side dishes for that meal. He's also restricted his side dishes to vegetables, fish and dairy products.

[Soundbite] Byeon Jeong-hwan (Traditional Medicine Doctor) : "It's the healthiest to eat once a day since quality precedes quantity in eating."

He's only eaten a meal a day for 20 years. He had the age of his blood vessels examined.

[Soundbite] Jeong Hyeong-jeong (Daegu Haany Univ. Traditional Medicine Hospital) : "He's in stage two in the aging blood vessel examination, indicating he has blood vessels of people in their 30s to 40s. His blood vessels are very healthy."

However, experts are split on whether this meal plan is beneficial for everyone.

[Soundbite] Dr. Hwang Seong-su (Neurosurgeon) : "There have different shock effects on the body that you eat all things to be used over 24 hours; dividing meals into three, you consume one meal’s calories in eight hours."

But there is one piece of advice that the experts agree on. That is, while only eating a little, the single meal should be good quality and contain all the necessary nutrients.

[Soundbite] Dr. Kim Min-yeong (Family Medicine) : "You should eat good quality food needed for the day in one meal but must also eat again in moderate portions at least once or twice a day."

It’s obviously a good idea not to eat too much, but it’s important to make sure your body gets enough energy to meet its needs.
  • Probe Raids
    • 입력 2012-10-18 17:33:27
    News Today
[Anchor Lead]

The independent counsel investigating the scandal surrounding President Lee Myung-bak’s cancelled retirement home project has raided the homes of key figures in the scandal including the president’s brother and son.

[Pkg]

On Thursday, the independent counsel that was assigned to investigate President Lee's now-scrapped retirement home project summoned former presidential security service staff member, Kim Tae-hwan, for investigation. Kim is a key figure regarding the retirement home project. He selected the Naegok-dong retirement home site and land for security facilities and signed the contract for around US$ 4,887,000 with the original owner known as Yoo. Furthermore, Kim was in charge of the paperwork for purchasing the same items for the two former presidents, Kim Dae-jung and Roh Moo-hyun. The independent counsel is expected to inquire why Kim, after the purhase, divided up the stakes of the home and security site all at once, unlike with the other former presidents, and if he ever intended to give any of the profits to President Lee's family. The counsel is also tracing bank accounts owned by President Lee's older brother and chairman of DAS Corporation Lee Sang-eun and the president's son Lee Si-hyung.

[Soundbite] Lee Chang-hun (Independent Council Assistant) : "We received search and seizure warrants for bank accounts of those involved including Lee Si-hyung."

In a written reply to the prosecutors, Lee Si-hyung stated that he borrowed a total of around US$ 1,086,000. He received half from a bank by mortgaging the land owned by first lady Kim Yoon-ok, and the remaining half came from his uncle Lee Sang-eun. The independent counsel is closely investigating where the money Si-hyung borrowed from Lee Sang-eun came from. After analyzing the seized articles, the counsel is planning to summon more of those involved for further investigation.

2. Prison Time

[Anchor Lead]

Five high-ranking officials from the prime minister's office have been given prison sentences in the wake of an illegal civilian surveillance scandal.

[Pkg]

When the Civil Service Ethics Division under the Prime Minister's Office was launched in 2008, the scope of its authority and goals was not clearly defined. People subject to illegal surveillance ranged from ordinary people to key figures from the political and business sectors, such as former Supreme Court Chief Justice Lee Yong-hoon and Samsung Group Chairman Lee Kun-hee. More than 500 cases of civilian surveillance were conducted over a period of two years. But those involved in the civilian surveillance scandal were indicted for only three of the cases, and the court upheld most of the charges against them. Former Vice Economy Minister Park Young-joon, a heavyweight in the surveillance scandal, was sentenced to two years in prison. The court also slapped him with a 172,000 U.S. dollar fine. Former presidential secretary Lee Young-ho has received a prison term of two and a half years. The former chief of the Civil Service Ethics Division, Lee In-kyu, was sentenced to a year in prison. He was arrested in court immediately after the verdict was announced. The former official of the Civil Service Ethics Division Jin Kyung-rak also received a sentence for a year behind bars, while the former presidential official Choi Jong-seok was sentenced to 10 months in jail.

[Soundbite] Jo Won-gyeong (Spokesman, Seoul Central District Court) : "The heavy punishment is intended to hold accountable officials who abused their power to violating citizens' basic rights and to prevent similar crimes from recurring in the future."

Although those responsible were finally punished, the victims of the illegal surveillance face numerous obstacles as they try to get compensation. One of the victims, Kim Jong-ik, has been jobless for nearly four years now. He has also recently contracted cancer. Even though a massive amount of evidence that had been gathered against the high-ranking Cheong Wa Dae officials involved in the scandal was presented over the course of 29 trials, the court has never issued a verdict on their wrongdoings.

3. Political Battles

[Anchor Lead]

The ruling and opposition parties are escalating their battles over presidential candidate Park Geun-hye’s involvement with a controversial scholarship foundation and former President Roh Moo-hyun’s alleged remarks on the invalidity of the western inter-Korean sea border.

[Pkg]

The ruling Saenuri Party urged the main opposition DUP presidential candidate Moon Jae-in to reveal if the minutes of the 2007 summit between former President Roh Moo-hyun and then North Korean leader Kim Jong-il, were repealed at Roh’s order. Moon served as chief of staff for the former president and the head of a task force that prepared for the inter-Korean summit. The ruling party also adopted a resolution urging the revelation and a parliamentary probe into allegations that the former president made on the nullification of the Northern Limit Line in the Yellow Sea. The main opposition party presidential candidate refuted the ruling party's claim, which he referred to as a baseless, negative campaign tactic against him. Moon reported Saenuri Party Representative Chung Mun-hun to the prosecution on charges of spreading false information. Chung is the first person who raised suspicion about the former president's NLL remarks. Meanwhile, the Democratic United Party (DUP) is pushing for a parliamentary probe and hearing on the Jeongsu Scholarship Foundation's decision to cash in its share in Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation'. The station made the decision in a meeting with the foundation. The main opposition party attacked Saenuri Party presidential candidate Park Geun-hye after unveiling a record of phone calls between Park and the foundation. They criticized her for denying her involvement. The Saenuri Party said that the calls were made to find out if the media reports on the foundation were true. The ruling party also raised suspicions that the DUP illegally tapped into and took pictures of its presidential candidate. Park said that she will soon disclose her position on the scholarship foundation. Park's latest remarks are a far cry from her previous position that she had nothing to do with the foundation. It remains to be seen whether Park will drastically change her position on this issue.

4. Korea-Africa Forum

[Anchor Lead]

The third Korea-Africa Forum was held in Seoul on Wednesday, where African countries sought to learn lessons from Korea's rapid economic development. Strengthened bilateral cooperation in developing resources was also agreed upon.

[Pkg]

A huge exploration in search of natural gas takes place in waters 80 kilometers northeast off of the coast of Mozambique. It is estimated that one-point-one billion tons of natural gas is buried in the region. As a participant in the exploration project, the Korea Gas Corporation has secured enough natural gas that can satisfy Korea's consumption for three years. Smartphones that are made in Korea are popular in Nairobi, Kenya’s capital city. Until recently, the African smartphone market has been dominated by Japan and China. But Korean companies have been increasing their share in the market by introducing their line of cutting-edge smartphones. In the third Korea-Africa Forum held in Seoul on Wednesday, Korea and member nations in the Africa Union Commission discussed measures to boost mutual exchanges and strengthen bilateral cooperation in developing resources and building social overhead capital.

[Soundbite] Kim Hwang-sik (Prime Minister) : "We have advanced technology and the experience of achieving rapid economic growth and Africa contains great potential, like a rough gemstone. If we cooperate and share these strengths, I firmly believe that we can open up a harmonious and prosperous future."

Representatives from African countries have paid keen interest to Korea's achievement of rapid economic development. Africa’s current per-capita gross national income is at a similar level to Korea’s figure recorded back in the 1960s. The Korean government plans to double its aid to Africa from the current 200 million dollars by 2015 in a way to expand exchanges and cooperation with the continent.

5. Living Apart

[Anchor Lead]

A survey has shown that one in ten married couples in Korea live apart on weekdays due to work or their children's education. Concerns are rising that such living situations could affect the strength of the nation’s families.

[Pkg]

Lee Jong-min works for a large corporation in Seoul. His wife lives in Daejeon, where she works as an elementary school teacher. The couple only gets to meet on weekends, and neither side is willing to give up work to live together. About one 1.15 million spouses across the nation live separately. That’s nearly 600,000 married couples that don’t live together. The number has doubled over the past decade. This is due to the growing number of households that are finding jobs in regions far from where they live, and also because both spouses are working. Another reason is because the growing numbers of couples want their children to study in large cities. However, living apart can take a toll on family bonds. Some couples also postpone pregnancy due to the financial burden associated with maintaining two separate homes. This could also hamper having a vibrant society.

[Soundbite] Kim Jeong-geun (Samsung Economic Research Inst.) : "The increase of spouses living separately is a concern as the nation's birth rate stays low. It can also weaken matrimonial bonds leading to divorce and broken families."

Family members of some 330,000 households throughout the nation also live overseas to work or study.

6. ABU Wraps Up

[Anchor Lead]

The Asia-Pacific Broadcasting Union General Assembly finished up its run in Seoul on Wednesday. At the final event, participants discussed ways to promote TV broadcasting in the age of new media.

[Pkg]

A mock music video showing Asia-Pacific Broadcasting Union executives dancing to the song "Gangnam Style" instantly livens up the venue of the Asia-Pacific Broadcasting Union General Assembly. "Gangnam Style" was able to become an international hit thanks to its popularity on YouTube and Facebook.

[Soundbite] Rachel Payne (Principal, Google Global Strategic Alliances Dept.)

The issue of how to innovate TV broadcasting in the age of new media, where the boundaries of time and space are becoming increasingly blurred, topped the agenda at this year's ABU General Assembly. The participants agreed that although television remains an influential medium for the public, television broadcasts should find ways to coexist with new media rather than compete with it. The participants came to a conclusion, noting that while the public's solid trust in television is essential, it’s about time to come up with ways to utilize mobile devices and social networking sites in conjunction with television broadcasts. This year's ABU General Assembly, which was held in Seoul under the theme "Beyond the Wave," finished its eight-day run on Wednesday.

7. Outlet Fires

[Anchor Lead]

Two children have died in a fire that broke out in a house in Suwon, Gyeonggi Province, on Wednesday. Investigators believe the fire began because of an overtaxed outlet.

[Pkg]

A six and three-year-old child died in a fire that occurred in a multi-family residential building. The fire started with a computer in a room. Several home appliances, such as a computer, recharger and an electric mat, were simultaneously plugged in a multiple socket outlet. Police and firefighters sent the melted outlet and electric wires to the National Forensic Service to find out the exact cause of the fire. An overloaded multiple-socket outlet also started a fire in a flat in Seoul. It was plugged in with several electric devices, and the resident left his home without switching it off.

[Soundbite] Kim Guk-yeong (Korea Electrical Safety Corp.) : "Multiple socket outlets are portable and capacities must not be exceeded. Electric devices must be unplugged when not in use."

With the cold weather approaching, people are advised to take extra precautions and use home appliances in a safer manner.

8. Anti-Crime Designs

[Anchor Lead]

Dark alleys at night often make people nervous about being the victim of a crime. Now, a new campaign is seeking to put minds at rest and prevent such attacks.

[Pkg]

Residents are reluctant to walk alone in this dark alley at night. As a woman presses an emergency button on a street lamppost, people come out of their houses to see what problem had set off the alarm. People in danger can seek help at homes marked with yellow doors, which is where designated civilian guards live. Surveillance cameras were also installed in the area. While taking a walk or jogging, residents naturally monitor what is happening in their neighborhood’s dark alleyways. Anti-crime signs have been posted to deter criminals.

[Soundbite] Prof. Pyo Chang-won (Korea National Police University) : "They’re seen to prevent at least 20 to 80 percent of crimes in many areas."

Anti-crime signs have been also posted to prevent school violence. A remote corner has turned into a playground for students. Monitors were installed at the school’s entrance, allowing everyone to see what is going on at any location on campus at any time. The Seoul metropolitan government plans to apply the trial project’s anti-crime measures to more regions next year based on their effects in the tested areas.

9. Cutting Meals

[Anchor Lead]

With the social pressures to stay slim especially strong in Korea, many fad diets come and go. These days, it’s the one-meal-a-day diet that’s drawing the most attention.

[Pkg]

Most people stick to the traditional three meals a day.

[Soundbite] "I eat all three meals."

[Soundbite] "I need to eat rice. It's a big deal, if I don't get my meals."

But these days, some dieters are cutting out two of their meals in a bid to shed some weight.

[Soundbite] Jeon Seong-sil (Elementary School Teacher) : "I only eat once a day so I skip lunch and have dinner. I was hungry at first but now I'm not."

Jeon Seong-sil, an elementary school teacher, started the one-meal-a-day plan three weeks ago.

[Soundbite] Jeong Hyo-jin (Jeon’s Co-worker) : "When he met a couple of his friends, he ate a full box of ramyeon. He always enjoyed eating meat."

Jeon didn't have the best eating habits before. He’s noticed some changes after cutting back on food.

[Soundbite] "I had a lot of heat in my head area and boils and pimples grew on my face but much of them are gone now. I feel my stomach has shrunk and I can't eat a lot now."

His weight has also gone down. We also spoke to 81-year-old traditional medicine doctor Byeon Jeong-hwan. He only eats once a day and only has a bowl of brown rice with a few side dishes for that meal. He's also restricted his side dishes to vegetables, fish and dairy products.

[Soundbite] Byeon Jeong-hwan (Traditional Medicine Doctor) : "It's the healthiest to eat once a day since quality precedes quantity in eating."

He's only eaten a meal a day for 20 years. He had the age of his blood vessels examined.

[Soundbite] Jeong Hyeong-jeong (Daegu Haany Univ. Traditional Medicine Hospital) : "He's in stage two in the aging blood vessel examination, indicating he has blood vessels of people in their 30s to 40s. His blood vessels are very healthy."

However, experts are split on whether this meal plan is beneficial for everyone.

[Soundbite] Dr. Hwang Seong-su (Neurosurgeon) : "There have different shock effects on the body that you eat all things to be used over 24 hours; dividing meals into three, you consume one meal’s calories in eight hours."

But there is one piece of advice that the experts agree on. That is, while only eating a little, the single meal should be good quality and contain all the necessary nutrients.

[Soundbite] Dr. Kim Min-yeong (Family Medicine) : "You should eat good quality food needed for the day in one meal but must also eat again in moderate portions at least once or twice a day."

It’s obviously a good idea not to eat too much, but it’s important to make sure your body gets enough energy to meet its needs.
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