기사 본문 영역

상세페이지

Campaigns Clashes
입력 2012.11.05 (16:36) News Today
자동재생
동영상영역 시작
동영상영역 끝
[Anchor Lead]



Tensions are rising between the three leading presidential candidates as election day nears. Moon Jae-in and Ahn Cheol-soo are still in a deadlock over how to pick a single liberal candidate.



[Pkg]



Democratic United Party’s presidential candidate Moon Jae-in personally suggested that independent contender Ahn Cheol-soo begin talks on fielding a single candidate. Moon pleaded to at least come to an agreement on the merger.



[Soundbite] Moon Jae-in (DUP Presidential Candidate): “I won’t insist on a favorable time or means. Let’s put all the cards on the table and start the discussions.”



Moon is also reportedly pondering over how to resolve issues of Democratic United Party executives resigning from the party. In response to Moon’s proposed discussions, independent candidate Ahn Cheol-soo said sincere political reform must first take place.



[Soundbite] Ahn Cheol-soo (Independent Presidential Candidate): “Sincere promises must be in place to bring about a successful governmental change.”



Ahn explained his criticism regarding the DUP’s factionalism saying that he was stressing the difficulty of governmental change without political reform. However, Ahn also stated that he respected the supporters of the Democratic United Party and the representatives that fought for democracy. The ruling Saenuri Party took their criticism regarding the two candidates moves towards an alliance up a notch.



[Soundbite] Kwon Young-se (Secretary-General, Park Campaign): “The alliance being discussed between candidates Ahn and Moon is typical collusion and a very bad alliance.”



The ruling party particularly accused the DUP of planning to revive the pro-Roh Moo-hyun administration and that Ahn was aggravating internal conflict within the opposition party.



2. Presidential Pledges



[Anchor Lead]



With the election now some 40 days away, the candidates spent the weekend refining their campaign pledges and visiting voters.



[Pkg]



The ruling Saenuri Party’s presidential candidate Park Geun-hye focused on fine-tuning her campaign pledges on November fourth.



[Soundbite] Ahn Hyoung-hwan (Spokesman, Saenuri Party): “She is focused on eradicating corruption and conducting comprehensive and substantial political reform of the party’s nomination of election candidates.”



Park will announce her campaign promises on political reform and welfare sometime this week. Over in Iksan, North Jeolla Province, main opposition Democratic United Party presidential candidate Moon Jae-in stressed the importance of communications in politics at an inauguration ceremony for the head of Won Buddhism.



[Soundbite] Rep. Moon Jae-in (DUP Presidential Candidate): “I’ll pursue honest politics. While doing so, I’ll communicate with, go along with, and carefully listen to the people.”



He also met with taxi drivers and listened to their concerns. Moon worked to win the support of the voters in the Jeolla provinces. Independent presidential candidate Ahn Cheol-soo also attended the Won Buddhism event. He emphasized the importance of political reform. On November fifth, he visited Gunsan. Ahn promised to create a new agency that will be in charge of the Saemangeum Reclamation Project, thereby giving the local government greater authority.



[Soundbite] Ahn Cheol-soo (Independent Presidential Candidate): “The central government shouldn’t hand out projects to local governments for balanced development. Local governments should be given real authority and financial discretion.”



For his next stop on his campaign trail, Ahn moved on to Gwangju and had an impromptu meeting with the local citizens.



3. Debt Concerns



[Anchor Lead]



Korea’s household, business and government debt now stands at 2.7 trillion U.S. dollars. Household debt, in particular, often comes from secondary institutions, pointing to the deteriorating quality of loans received by ordinary people.



[Pkg]



Yang Seong-guk is an entrepreneur. He received a bank loan of nearly US$220,000 for his business. He recently tried to get another loan from the same bank but was denied. So he decided to get a loan from a savings bank, but now he has to pay a higher interest. Since it’s now more difficult for entrepreneurs to receive loans from banks, many of them are increasingly turning to secondary financial institutions. The amount of personal loans received from secondary financial institutions has already surpassed that of bank loans, but the average interest rate for loans from secondary financial institutions is more than five times as high. To make things worse, 60 percent of people who get loans from secondary financial institutions receive them from at least three different places, and therefore face a high risk of debt insolvency. The amount of home-equity loans provided by secondary financial institutions now stands at US$119 billion, which raises the greatest concern.



[Soundbite] Kim Yun-gi (Daishin Economic Research Institute): “If the price of real estate owned by high-income people whose debt-to-equity ratio is very high, fall, we can’t rule out the possibility of risk spreading across the financial sector.”



Allowing for more public access to loans whose interest rates fall between those of banks and secondary financial institutions is urgent in order to improve the quality of personal loans.



4. Exam Prayers



[Anchor Lead]



Korea’s much-feared college entrance exam will be held on November 8 this year. With three days to go, many mothers are praying for their children’s success at Buddhist temples.



[Pkg]



The main hall of a Buddhist temple is full of mothers who are praying for their children’s success in gaining admission to college this year. They repeatedly bow to the statue of Buddha in front of them, matching their movements to the sound of a Buddhist gong. They sincerely and desperately wish that their children will not make any mistakes on the college entrance exam so that they can get into the school of their choice.



[Soundbite] “I came here thinking that I can say better things to my child if I’m at ease. I hope the power of my prayer will give my child a brighter future.”



People buy chocolates and sticky rice cakes at a department store. These items are presents for the test takers. The forks signify a wish that the test takers will only choose the right answers. Chocolates, rice cakes and taffy are beautifully decorated to wish the test takers good luck. The word "hapgyeok," which means "passed" in Korean, is marked on some apples, which are a popular gift item for test takers. The Korea Meteorological Administration predicts that this year’s test day will not be cold. The weather agency forecasts that on November eighth, the temperature will be similar to those recorded during the same period in the previous years.



5. Hope Through Music



[Anchor Lead]



Many students born in North Korea who’ve escaped to the South find it hard to adjust to school life because of the differences in culture. Now, one school is helping such kids adapt through music.



[Pkg]



About half of the members of this children’s band are students who were born in North Korea but later defected to the South with their families. It is not easy for children from North Korea to become friends with South Korean children because of their different environments and cultures. However, music is bringing change to their lives at a school in South Korea. Four months ago, they joined a band and started learning how to play musical instruments together with South Korean students.



[Soundbite] “While learning to play an instrument, I’ve gotten closer to other students. Playing with the band was a lot of fun.”



They were once reluctant to approach and talk to each other, but they can now easily keep in beat together while playing a song. School authorities are now less concerned about the children from North Korea who are getting used to their new lives by participating in the band. There are roughly 3,700 North Koreans 19 years old or under that have come to South Korea. This children’s band shows that music, a borderless language, can help North Korean-born students find comfort while trying to adapt to a new, unfamiliar environment in the South.



6. Breaking Bones



[Anchor Lead]



Many people know that diabetes causes complications such as a loss of vision and heart disease. But it also significantly raises the risk of broken bones.



[Pkg]



This elderly woman had to receive an artificial joint transplant because of a hip fracture. Even though she didn’t have osteoporosis, she broke her hip bone when she fell down one day. Her bones became fragile because of diabetes, which she has had for more than 20 years now. A survey conducted by a university hospital shows that diabetic neuropathy raises the risk of fractures by 37-fold. Hip bone fractures top the list. They are trailed by the fractures of wrist and arm bones. Even when diabetics do not suffer from osteoporosis and have a normal bone density, they will still have a high risk of bone fractures because the diabetes itself weakens the bone.



[Soundbite] Prof. Jang Sang-a (Catholic Univ. of Korea. St. Paul’s Hospital): “The senses of those with diabetes neuropathy become dull and they have difficulty keeping their balance. Walking becomes a challenge, and they can easily fall and break their bones.”



Experts recommend diabetics to remove obstacles in their homes in order to prevent falls and to exercise extra caution on a daily basis.



7. Island Tourism



[Anchor Lead]



Development is restricted in and around Korea’s national parks and local residents often struggle with such regulations. But the villagers you’re about to meet from a small southern island are making the best of their national park designation by promoting tourism.



[Pkg]



A five-minute boat ride away from Gujora port in Geoje, South Gyeongsang Province is a small island. The island is relatively unknown compared to its famous tourist attraction neighbor, Oedo Island. Clean waters wash along on the shore while a pristine environment unfolds for tourists on a hiking trail. An iconic forest thick with hundreds-of-year-old camellia trees also exists on the island. Tourists can overlook Geoje and the coastal areas along Haegeumgang at an observatory. Things began to change for some ten families living in this once ordinary fishing village. Hospitality facilities and tourist attractions were built in the village after it was chosen as a masterwork village last year. The village’s tourism income has grown more than five-fold since last year thanks to an increasing number of visitors.



[Soundbite] Kim Myeong-gyu (Naedo Island Self-Governing Committee): “Instead of being expressed as a mere number, it gave hope to villagers. We’re proud to be called a masterpiece village.”



The Korea National Park Service plans to develop 50 such villages near national parks as new tourist attractions by 2020.



8. Neglected Facilities



[Anchor Lead]



Many of Korea’s public parks have outdoor exercise equipment. But such facilities are often installed in hard-to-access spots and in those cases, they’re not getting used enough to make putting them in worthwhile.



[Pkg]



Just a year ago, this desolate farmland was transformed into an outdoor exercise space. More than 9,000 U.S. dollars were invested in the project. The space features four of the latest exercise machines, and the ground is covered with grass. But it’s hard to see people taking advantage of the facilities here. The outdoor gym was created in a vacant space right next to a highway that has no pedestrian walkway. The site is now surrounded by weeds and piles of garbage. The exercise equipment has become corroded and is now covered with spider webs as nobody has used it for a long time. The situation is similar in urban areas. Exercise equipment is hard to spot here since the cars are in the way. With so many cars parked here, exercising in this park can be quite a dangerous experience. Outdoor exercise equipment is often installed in places that are far from ideal for exercising. But there are no clear regulations to stop this practice. While the authorities seem to be proactive in expanding the public’s access to such equipment, it appears as though they are doing a poor job at planning and managing it properly. One outdoor exercise machine costs up to 2800 dollars to install. So far, more than 450 million U.S. dollars have been poured into some 75,000 sites nationwide for the installation of these outdoor facilities.



9. Rustic Paradise



[Anchor Lead]



In Korea’s intensely urban environment, there’s a growing nostalgia for the countryside as it once was, far away from the rat race of the big city. Today we’re going to meet a couple whose pining for nature led them to create their own little piece of rural paradise.



[Pkg]



We met the couple deep in the woods of Chilgap Mountain.



[Soundbite] “Thank you for coming all this way.”



[Soundbite] “This is my wife. “



This is the house of Son Cheol who was one of Korea’s very first comedians in the 1970s. This stone marker displays the name of their home, “Sun and Moon.”



[Soundbite] “Son Cheol (Comedian/Artist): It’s called Sun and Moon. The upper house is the sun where the sunset view is beautiful and the lower house is the moon since it’s beautiful in the moonlight. Thus, the name Sun and Moon.”



Since the couple moved out here 20 years ago, Son has gone to great lengths to make his wife, Lee su-rim comfortable in the countryside. The pathways in the garden are all marked with stepping stones, which are an example of Son’s efforts.



[Soundbite] “Lee Su-rim (Wife): The dew falls quickly in the morning and in the evening so my shoes and pants would get all wet. I casually said that it would be nice if some stones were laid. One day, I came and they were all there.”



Son also made the garden for his wife.



[Soundbite] “I’ve planted two zelkova trees. One is for my cremated ashes to be scattered around after my life ends. The same goes for the other tree for my wife.”



The garden provides them with fresh produce all year round.



[Soundbite] “I didn’t put anything in the soup except for deonjang (soybean paste) and mulberry leaves. It’s very savory and tasty.”



The animals are also part of the family here at Sun and Moon. The couple carries the food they’ve gathered and heads to the upper house, the "Sun." To feel closer to nature, they installed wide windows all around the home. Deep in the house through a maze of hallways, is this special room.



[Soundbite] “He made this place especially for me. I rest, enjoy music, read books and take a nap here. He seems to like the room more than me because he’s happy to see me with my own place.”



The wife repays all she’s received from her husband by preparing delicious meals. Goose eggs gathered from the front yard turn into a steamed dish and freshly picked mulberry leaves go into soybean paste soup, a Korean staple called doenjang-guk.



[Soundbite] “The foods that need to be chewed and are digested slowly don’t raise the sugar level and are healthier.”



Dessert is also found in the garden.



[Soundbite] “For dessert, we pick a persimmon from the tree.”



And in the corner of the yard is a cozy place to spend some time after dinner.



[Soundbite] “I gathered each and every stone, covered it with cement and created the fireplace.”



[Soundbite] “After making it, he showed it to me.”



Every detail of this home and garden has been thought out, from each tree to each stone.



[Soundbite] “Our home is our eternal love nest where we continue to love each other and where anyone can stop by and rest.”



In an increasingly urbanized nation, this rustic country life at the foot of Mount Chilgap has a particular appeal.
  • Campaigns Clashes
    • 입력 2012-11-05 16:36:34
    News Today
[Anchor Lead]



Tensions are rising between the three leading presidential candidates as election day nears. Moon Jae-in and Ahn Cheol-soo are still in a deadlock over how to pick a single liberal candidate.



[Pkg]



Democratic United Party’s presidential candidate Moon Jae-in personally suggested that independent contender Ahn Cheol-soo begin talks on fielding a single candidate. Moon pleaded to at least come to an agreement on the merger.



[Soundbite] Moon Jae-in (DUP Presidential Candidate): “I won’t insist on a favorable time or means. Let’s put all the cards on the table and start the discussions.”



Moon is also reportedly pondering over how to resolve issues of Democratic United Party executives resigning from the party. In response to Moon’s proposed discussions, independent candidate Ahn Cheol-soo said sincere political reform must first take place.



[Soundbite] Ahn Cheol-soo (Independent Presidential Candidate): “Sincere promises must be in place to bring about a successful governmental change.”



Ahn explained his criticism regarding the DUP’s factionalism saying that he was stressing the difficulty of governmental change without political reform. However, Ahn also stated that he respected the supporters of the Democratic United Party and the representatives that fought for democracy. The ruling Saenuri Party took their criticism regarding the two candidates moves towards an alliance up a notch.



[Soundbite] Kwon Young-se (Secretary-General, Park Campaign): “The alliance being discussed between candidates Ahn and Moon is typical collusion and a very bad alliance.”



The ruling party particularly accused the DUP of planning to revive the pro-Roh Moo-hyun administration and that Ahn was aggravating internal conflict within the opposition party.



2. Presidential Pledges



[Anchor Lead]



With the election now some 40 days away, the candidates spent the weekend refining their campaign pledges and visiting voters.



[Pkg]



The ruling Saenuri Party’s presidential candidate Park Geun-hye focused on fine-tuning her campaign pledges on November fourth.



[Soundbite] Ahn Hyoung-hwan (Spokesman, Saenuri Party): “She is focused on eradicating corruption and conducting comprehensive and substantial political reform of the party’s nomination of election candidates.”



Park will announce her campaign promises on political reform and welfare sometime this week. Over in Iksan, North Jeolla Province, main opposition Democratic United Party presidential candidate Moon Jae-in stressed the importance of communications in politics at an inauguration ceremony for the head of Won Buddhism.



[Soundbite] Rep. Moon Jae-in (DUP Presidential Candidate): “I’ll pursue honest politics. While doing so, I’ll communicate with, go along with, and carefully listen to the people.”



He also met with taxi drivers and listened to their concerns. Moon worked to win the support of the voters in the Jeolla provinces. Independent presidential candidate Ahn Cheol-soo also attended the Won Buddhism event. He emphasized the importance of political reform. On November fifth, he visited Gunsan. Ahn promised to create a new agency that will be in charge of the Saemangeum Reclamation Project, thereby giving the local government greater authority.



[Soundbite] Ahn Cheol-soo (Independent Presidential Candidate): “The central government shouldn’t hand out projects to local governments for balanced development. Local governments should be given real authority and financial discretion.”



For his next stop on his campaign trail, Ahn moved on to Gwangju and had an impromptu meeting with the local citizens.



3. Debt Concerns



[Anchor Lead]



Korea’s household, business and government debt now stands at 2.7 trillion U.S. dollars. Household debt, in particular, often comes from secondary institutions, pointing to the deteriorating quality of loans received by ordinary people.



[Pkg]



Yang Seong-guk is an entrepreneur. He received a bank loan of nearly US$220,000 for his business. He recently tried to get another loan from the same bank but was denied. So he decided to get a loan from a savings bank, but now he has to pay a higher interest. Since it’s now more difficult for entrepreneurs to receive loans from banks, many of them are increasingly turning to secondary financial institutions. The amount of personal loans received from secondary financial institutions has already surpassed that of bank loans, but the average interest rate for loans from secondary financial institutions is more than five times as high. To make things worse, 60 percent of people who get loans from secondary financial institutions receive them from at least three different places, and therefore face a high risk of debt insolvency. The amount of home-equity loans provided by secondary financial institutions now stands at US$119 billion, which raises the greatest concern.



[Soundbite] Kim Yun-gi (Daishin Economic Research Institute): “If the price of real estate owned by high-income people whose debt-to-equity ratio is very high, fall, we can’t rule out the possibility of risk spreading across the financial sector.”



Allowing for more public access to loans whose interest rates fall between those of banks and secondary financial institutions is urgent in order to improve the quality of personal loans.



4. Exam Prayers



[Anchor Lead]



Korea’s much-feared college entrance exam will be held on November 8 this year. With three days to go, many mothers are praying for their children’s success at Buddhist temples.



[Pkg]



The main hall of a Buddhist temple is full of mothers who are praying for their children’s success in gaining admission to college this year. They repeatedly bow to the statue of Buddha in front of them, matching their movements to the sound of a Buddhist gong. They sincerely and desperately wish that their children will not make any mistakes on the college entrance exam so that they can get into the school of their choice.



[Soundbite] “I came here thinking that I can say better things to my child if I’m at ease. I hope the power of my prayer will give my child a brighter future.”



People buy chocolates and sticky rice cakes at a department store. These items are presents for the test takers. The forks signify a wish that the test takers will only choose the right answers. Chocolates, rice cakes and taffy are beautifully decorated to wish the test takers good luck. The word "hapgyeok," which means "passed" in Korean, is marked on some apples, which are a popular gift item for test takers. The Korea Meteorological Administration predicts that this year’s test day will not be cold. The weather agency forecasts that on November eighth, the temperature will be similar to those recorded during the same period in the previous years.



5. Hope Through Music



[Anchor Lead]



Many students born in North Korea who’ve escaped to the South find it hard to adjust to school life because of the differences in culture. Now, one school is helping such kids adapt through music.



[Pkg]



About half of the members of this children’s band are students who were born in North Korea but later defected to the South with their families. It is not easy for children from North Korea to become friends with South Korean children because of their different environments and cultures. However, music is bringing change to their lives at a school in South Korea. Four months ago, they joined a band and started learning how to play musical instruments together with South Korean students.



[Soundbite] “While learning to play an instrument, I’ve gotten closer to other students. Playing with the band was a lot of fun.”



They were once reluctant to approach and talk to each other, but they can now easily keep in beat together while playing a song. School authorities are now less concerned about the children from North Korea who are getting used to their new lives by participating in the band. There are roughly 3,700 North Koreans 19 years old or under that have come to South Korea. This children’s band shows that music, a borderless language, can help North Korean-born students find comfort while trying to adapt to a new, unfamiliar environment in the South.



6. Breaking Bones



[Anchor Lead]



Many people know that diabetes causes complications such as a loss of vision and heart disease. But it also significantly raises the risk of broken bones.



[Pkg]



This elderly woman had to receive an artificial joint transplant because of a hip fracture. Even though she didn’t have osteoporosis, she broke her hip bone when she fell down one day. Her bones became fragile because of diabetes, which she has had for more than 20 years now. A survey conducted by a university hospital shows that diabetic neuropathy raises the risk of fractures by 37-fold. Hip bone fractures top the list. They are trailed by the fractures of wrist and arm bones. Even when diabetics do not suffer from osteoporosis and have a normal bone density, they will still have a high risk of bone fractures because the diabetes itself weakens the bone.



[Soundbite] Prof. Jang Sang-a (Catholic Univ. of Korea. St. Paul’s Hospital): “The senses of those with diabetes neuropathy become dull and they have difficulty keeping their balance. Walking becomes a challenge, and they can easily fall and break their bones.”



Experts recommend diabetics to remove obstacles in their homes in order to prevent falls and to exercise extra caution on a daily basis.



7. Island Tourism



[Anchor Lead]



Development is restricted in and around Korea’s national parks and local residents often struggle with such regulations. But the villagers you’re about to meet from a small southern island are making the best of their national park designation by promoting tourism.



[Pkg]



A five-minute boat ride away from Gujora port in Geoje, South Gyeongsang Province is a small island. The island is relatively unknown compared to its famous tourist attraction neighbor, Oedo Island. Clean waters wash along on the shore while a pristine environment unfolds for tourists on a hiking trail. An iconic forest thick with hundreds-of-year-old camellia trees also exists on the island. Tourists can overlook Geoje and the coastal areas along Haegeumgang at an observatory. Things began to change for some ten families living in this once ordinary fishing village. Hospitality facilities and tourist attractions were built in the village after it was chosen as a masterwork village last year. The village’s tourism income has grown more than five-fold since last year thanks to an increasing number of visitors.



[Soundbite] Kim Myeong-gyu (Naedo Island Self-Governing Committee): “Instead of being expressed as a mere number, it gave hope to villagers. We’re proud to be called a masterpiece village.”



The Korea National Park Service plans to develop 50 such villages near national parks as new tourist attractions by 2020.



8. Neglected Facilities



[Anchor Lead]



Many of Korea’s public parks have outdoor exercise equipment. But such facilities are often installed in hard-to-access spots and in those cases, they’re not getting used enough to make putting them in worthwhile.



[Pkg]



Just a year ago, this desolate farmland was transformed into an outdoor exercise space. More than 9,000 U.S. dollars were invested in the project. The space features four of the latest exercise machines, and the ground is covered with grass. But it’s hard to see people taking advantage of the facilities here. The outdoor gym was created in a vacant space right next to a highway that has no pedestrian walkway. The site is now surrounded by weeds and piles of garbage. The exercise equipment has become corroded and is now covered with spider webs as nobody has used it for a long time. The situation is similar in urban areas. Exercise equipment is hard to spot here since the cars are in the way. With so many cars parked here, exercising in this park can be quite a dangerous experience. Outdoor exercise equipment is often installed in places that are far from ideal for exercising. But there are no clear regulations to stop this practice. While the authorities seem to be proactive in expanding the public’s access to such equipment, it appears as though they are doing a poor job at planning and managing it properly. One outdoor exercise machine costs up to 2800 dollars to install. So far, more than 450 million U.S. dollars have been poured into some 75,000 sites nationwide for the installation of these outdoor facilities.



9. Rustic Paradise



[Anchor Lead]



In Korea’s intensely urban environment, there’s a growing nostalgia for the countryside as it once was, far away from the rat race of the big city. Today we’re going to meet a couple whose pining for nature led them to create their own little piece of rural paradise.



[Pkg]



We met the couple deep in the woods of Chilgap Mountain.



[Soundbite] “Thank you for coming all this way.”



[Soundbite] “This is my wife. “



This is the house of Son Cheol who was one of Korea’s very first comedians in the 1970s. This stone marker displays the name of their home, “Sun and Moon.”



[Soundbite] “Son Cheol (Comedian/Artist): It’s called Sun and Moon. The upper house is the sun where the sunset view is beautiful and the lower house is the moon since it’s beautiful in the moonlight. Thus, the name Sun and Moon.”



Since the couple moved out here 20 years ago, Son has gone to great lengths to make his wife, Lee su-rim comfortable in the countryside. The pathways in the garden are all marked with stepping stones, which are an example of Son’s efforts.



[Soundbite] “Lee Su-rim (Wife): The dew falls quickly in the morning and in the evening so my shoes and pants would get all wet. I casually said that it would be nice if some stones were laid. One day, I came and they were all there.”



Son also made the garden for his wife.



[Soundbite] “I’ve planted two zelkova trees. One is for my cremated ashes to be scattered around after my life ends. The same goes for the other tree for my wife.”



The garden provides them with fresh produce all year round.



[Soundbite] “I didn’t put anything in the soup except for deonjang (soybean paste) and mulberry leaves. It’s very savory and tasty.”



The animals are also part of the family here at Sun and Moon. The couple carries the food they’ve gathered and heads to the upper house, the "Sun." To feel closer to nature, they installed wide windows all around the home. Deep in the house through a maze of hallways, is this special room.



[Soundbite] “He made this place especially for me. I rest, enjoy music, read books and take a nap here. He seems to like the room more than me because he’s happy to see me with my own place.”



The wife repays all she’s received from her husband by preparing delicious meals. Goose eggs gathered from the front yard turn into a steamed dish and freshly picked mulberry leaves go into soybean paste soup, a Korean staple called doenjang-guk.



[Soundbite] “The foods that need to be chewed and are digested slowly don’t raise the sugar level and are healthier.”



Dessert is also found in the garden.



[Soundbite] “For dessert, we pick a persimmon from the tree.”



And in the corner of the yard is a cozy place to spend some time after dinner.



[Soundbite] “I gathered each and every stone, covered it with cement and created the fireplace.”



[Soundbite] “After making it, he showed it to me.”



Every detail of this home and garden has been thought out, from each tree to each stone.



[Soundbite] “Our home is our eternal love nest where we continue to love each other and where anyone can stop by and rest.”



In an increasingly urbanized nation, this rustic country life at the foot of Mount Chilgap has a particular appeal.
kbs가 손수 골랐습니다. 네이버에서도 보세요.