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Lee's Probe
입력 2012.11.13 (18:52) News Today
자동재생
동영상영역 시작
동영상영역 끝
[Anchor Lead]

A special team probing the scandal surrounding the president’s nixed retirement home project has been denied a request for more time for their investigation. The proposal needed to be okayed by the presidential office, but did not make it through.

[Pkg]

Cheong Wa Dae rejected the special counsel team's request to extend the probe period citing that there have been enough investigations. The refusal was based on the fact that the independent probe team summoned and questioned some 20 figures including the president's son Lee Si-hyung and elder brother Lee Sang-eun 40 times and carried out an unprecedented search. This included confiscating over 200 pages-worth of confidential documents from the presidential security service. Cheong Wa Dae stressed that a prolonged investigation would hinder the president's management of state affairs during his remaining term and would also affect the December 19th presidential election.

[Soundbite] Choe Geum-nak (Senior Secretary, Cheong Wa Dae) : "If the probe is extended, the results will be revealed during the presidential election and will likely lead to political disputes over them."

Regarding Cheong Wa Dae's announcement, the ruling Saenuri Party said it was the right decision while opposition groups denounced that it will only infuriate the people.

[Soundbite] Rep. Lee Cheol-woo (Spokesman, Saenuri Party) : "We clearly state that it must not be used for political purposes, just as we’ve been worrying about."

[Soundbite] Rep. Lee Un-ju (Spokeswoman, DUP) : "Rejecting the probe won’t help cover up irregularities; it’ll infuriate the people."

This is the second time Cheong Wa Dae has refused to extend a special counsel investigation, the first taking place in 2003 during the Roh Moo-hyun administration for the probe on former president Kim Dae-jung's alleged secret transmission of US$500 million to Pyongyang in return for the 2000 inter-Korean summit.

2. Other Hopefuls

[Anchor Lead]

The lion’s share of media attention during the run up to this year’s presidential election has been focused on the three main candidates. But there are other hopefuls as well, and they’re stepping up their efforts to turn the spotlight toward their quests for the presidency.

[Pkg]

Progressive Justice Party presidential candidate Shim Sang-jung is an incumbent lawmaker. She doesn't only stick to her constituency. Instead, she headed out to meet with laborers as part of her campaign trail. Shim presented five tasks to clean up the scandals that surfaced during the current government. She also called for bold economic and social reforms and the resolution of major labor issues. The Unified Progressive Party's presidential candidate Lee Jung-hee is actively working to reunify the progressive forces, seeking to overcome the repercussions from an election fraud scandal. She is pledging to create more labor unions. She also wants to raise the maximum income tax rate and the minimum wage. Independent presidential candidates Kang Ji-won and lawyer Park Chan-jong formed a policy coalition. They call for the reform of politics, economy and society. They also gave their two cents to fellow politicians. Independent candidate Lee Kun-gae stresses a small but clean government. He also calls for uncorrupt public officials and politicians. Although they are not in the spotlight, the minor candidates are trying to win the voters’ support with their various ideological backgrounds as well as experimental and unusual campaign pledges.

3. Homeless in Need

[Anchor Lead]

The harshest season of the year for the homeless is rapidly approaching. Let’s take a look now at life on the streets of Seoul.

[Pkg]

There are dozens of the homeless in the underpass in front of Seoul Station. They try to block the cold breeze using only cardboard boxes. Some even sleep on a sidewalk outside.

[Soundbite] "(It's too cold. You should go to a shelter.) No."

The homeless have to endure the winter in cold streets. They need to be provided with stable jobs and housing so they can get back on their feet and become self-sufficient. Yu Sang-hui was a homeless man five years ago, but now, he runs a cleaning company. He happened to work as a cleaner and began to enjoy the job, which allowed him to escape the life of a homeless.

[Soundbite] Yu Sang-hui (CEO, Cleaning Company) : "I believe that giving them opportunities to start a new life is important, than trying to remove the homeless people from the streets."

Of the Seoul government's budget of US$38 million for the homeless this year, only US$7.2 million was set aside for helping them find jobs and return to a normal life. Homeless people live on the streets without hope but may be able to get back on their feet if given the chance.

4. Premature Babies

[Anchor Lead]

The number of premature babies has soared in the nation in recent years as women wait longer to have their first child.

[Pkg]

This premature baby was born during the sixth month stage of pregnancy. The baby weighs 750 grams and is only 32 centimeters tall. The newborn needs the help of an incubator to receive oxygen and nutrients. Premature babies, who are born before the 37th week of pregnancy, now account for more than eight percent of all newborns in the nation. The main factors behind the trend include the older age of women giving birth to their first child as a result of getting married later in life as well as the growing number of twins stemming from in vitro fertilizations. Parents of premature babies have to pay a hefty price to use the incubators and get medicine, without which the preemies cannot survive as they have weak immune systems due to their underdeveloped respiratory organs and nervous system. The survival rate for premature babies who weigh under 1.5 kilograms exceeds 87 percent, but the average health care costs needed to help them survive reach 16,000 U.S. dollars per preemie. Health insurance does not cover medical care for premature babies, which explains the heavy financial burden of parents. In fact, 85 percent of mothers of preemies say that they face serious financial problems, with about half of them feeling guilty.

[Soundbite] Bae Jong-wu (The Korean Society of Neonatology) : "I believe that by giving these babies good treatment and helping them survive, we can overcome the low birthrate and encourage our demographic power."

In the era of a plunging birthrate, premature babies and their families are in desperate need of help from society.

5. Book Ads

[Anchor Lead]

The list of best sellers and recommended books play a major role in consumer decisions on book buying Web sites. But on the nation's largest online bookstores, it turns out that spots on such lists are for sale.

[Pkg]

This is the homepage of Korea's largest online bookstore. The list of bestsellers appears in the right-hand corner of the page. This online bookstore displayed the list of newly recommended books for a week in early May. The books were picked not based on reader reviews but on advertisements exceeding US$2,000 that the bookstore received from publishers. The Fair Trade Commission caught four large online bookstores that received advertisement money from publishers in return for recommending their books to customers. The amount depended on where the advertisement was displayed and its image size.

[Soundbite] Seong Gyeong-je (Fair Trade Commission) : "This constitutes an act of fraud because the online bookstores gave the false impression that they were recommending books evaluated by their quality."

The publishers claim they advertised their books in this manner to catch the eyes of readers. But others are saying that books recommended by bookstores mislead customers making them look like they’re of high quality or selling well. The Fair Trade Commission has ordered the four online bookstores to take corrective measures and levied US$23,000 in fines, but it remains to be seen if the act of publishers advertising their books by confusing readers will be gone for good.

6. Eatery Closing

[Anchor Lead]

There is a restaurant in Korea where customers can have as much food as they want and pay as much as they can afford. It's a social enterprise called "Eateries without thresholds" (or “Eateries with Borders” in English), but it's now on the verge of closing.

[Pkg]

The kitchen staff is busy cooking. Many people visit this eatery because at this restaurant, they can eat as much as they want while paying as much as they can afford. It's a social enterprise called Wolf Place in English, but the direct translation of its Korean name is "Eatery without Threshold." Each customer here usually pays around $2.70 to $3.60 per meal. But it costs more than 7 U.S. dollars to prepare just one serving since the eatery uses only organic ingredients to promote an eco-friendly lifestyle. The owner of the restaurant eventually decided to close the place because of its snowballing losses. The customers, most of whom struggle financially, were discouraged upon hearing the news.

[Soundbite] "I pay more when business is good, and less when it's not. This is an ideal place for those like me. There’s no place to eat if it goes away; it should stay here."

The local residents have set up a committee to try to help the eatery survive. They hope that their efforts will help carry on the spirit of sharing during tough times.

7. Photo History

[Anchor Lead]

We go now to an exhibition of old photos owned by Seoul citizens that tell the story of the many dramatic changes the city has experienced.

[Pkg]

A foreigners' apartment was removed 18 years ago as part of the Seoul city government's project to restore the original landscape of Mount Nam. A child covers her ears at the sound of the detonation. A photo taken in front of the former National Museum offers a view of the Japanese colonial government building. This year's Seoul Photo Festival has reconstructed the history of Seoul using photos donated by its citizens.

[Soundbite] Lee Yeong-nam (Historian) : "The photos are private records and couldn't have been preserved properly if they weren't taken and owned by individuals. They are now open to the public and broaden the scope of history."

A tram runs through Namdaemun Street. A traditional Korean house can be seen with a signboard of a foreign beverage company on top. A cow tills in front of apartments in Apgujeong, now one of Seoul’s most affluent areas. Shacks are lined along the Cheonggye Stream. The pictures of professional photographers' recording the radical transformations Seoul has witnessed throughout its modernization will also be on display at the exhibition. The Seoul metropolitan government will accumulate and preserve the photos according to each district as historical materials.

8. `90s Rehash

[Anchor Lead]

In pop culture, an era may be over but it is never forgotten. The constant recycling of styles has creators in Korea now turning their focus to the ’90s.

[Pkg]

This movie drew in four million viewers. It is an unusual feat for a romantic movie. The strongest weapon of this movie is that it evokes people's memories. Rather than reliving the turbulent ‘80s, which was an age dominated by antigovernment protests and the smell of tear-gas bombs, it depicts the life of college students in the 1990s. The ‘90s era has returned to the cultural scene. Styles from the 1990s are having a great impact on the overall culture in Korea. An example is a joint comeback concert held by singers who were immensely popular until the mid-‘90s. Some cafes and bars use memorabilia from the 1990s, such as roller skates and LP records, for their interior decoration.

[Soundbite] "I like new contemporary music, but I come here to listen to music I grew up with to get that sense of nostalgia."

The return of the 1990s style and trend is linked to the emergence of the Seo Tae-ji generation as a main player and consumer in the cultural sector. The Seo Tae-ji generation refers to people who used be fans of super star singer Seo tae-ji in the ‘90s. Each generation faced distinctive troubles and harbored different ideas. With the return of the ‘90s, people are able to travel back in time and relive those years.

9. New Dos

[Anchor Lead]

We live in the age of plastic surgery in Korea, but before you decide to go under the knife, consider what a difference a new hairdo can make.

[Pkg]

In Korea, there is a standard middle-aged woman’s haircut that many ladies opt for.

[Soundbite] "I always have short hair with strong curls. It lasts for about three months. I can save money."

But a small change to your hairstyle can make you look ten years younger.

[Soundbite] Taeyang (Hairdresser) : "Bobs are trendy this fall. Actresses like Park Si-yeon and Kim Hye-su have bobs."

This lady goes for a trendy bob. Volume is a key aspect of a bob. And they say lighter dye jobs are better. With the addition of some bangs, her new look is complete.

[Soundbite] "My forehead was always showing. Now, half of it is hidden and the hair is full. My face looks smaller. I love it."

Here are some simple tips for jazzing up your hairstyle without paying a penny.

[Soundbite] Cha Hong (Hairdresser) : "Hello, I'm hairdresser Cha Hong. I’m going to give you some simple tips on competely changing your hairstyles without cuts and perms."

Weak, dry hair is the biggest hair issue for middle-aged women.

[Soundbite] "Put a brush on the hair and rub it."

Some touches to the roots give you a whole new style.

[Soundbite] "Hair lies in zigzags. This is to puff it up. The more you rub it, the fuller it will get."

Blowing drying your roots gives your hair a fuller look.

[Soundbite] "I feel like I can go out with my hair styled like this every day. It’s easy and makes my hair thick."

This woman thinks she’s starting to look old, and isn’t happy with the roundness of her face and the state of her cheeks.

[Soundbite] "Facial lifting effects are really important to women. The same goes for hair. Giving volume and a lifiting effect to hair will make you look young, definitely."

Rollers are a cheap way to give your hairstyle new life.

[Soundbite] "Put a roller in the middle of the hair and turn it from the end."

For ladies with rounder faces, tying the hair up high is a good option.

[Soundbite] "Leave some hair on the sides"

And a bit of extra volume can make your face look slimmer.

[Soundbite] "My bang used to be flat; I didn't puff them up. The curled, round bangs make my forehead look like Jjang-gu’s. I look cute. It looks as if I got a shot of botox on my forehead."

Many women don’t realize what a difference a little extra attention to your hairdo can make to your confidence.
  • Lee's Probe
    • 입력 2012-11-13 18:52:57
    News Today
[Anchor Lead]

A special team probing the scandal surrounding the president’s nixed retirement home project has been denied a request for more time for their investigation. The proposal needed to be okayed by the presidential office, but did not make it through.

[Pkg]

Cheong Wa Dae rejected the special counsel team's request to extend the probe period citing that there have been enough investigations. The refusal was based on the fact that the independent probe team summoned and questioned some 20 figures including the president's son Lee Si-hyung and elder brother Lee Sang-eun 40 times and carried out an unprecedented search. This included confiscating over 200 pages-worth of confidential documents from the presidential security service. Cheong Wa Dae stressed that a prolonged investigation would hinder the president's management of state affairs during his remaining term and would also affect the December 19th presidential election.

[Soundbite] Choe Geum-nak (Senior Secretary, Cheong Wa Dae) : "If the probe is extended, the results will be revealed during the presidential election and will likely lead to political disputes over them."

Regarding Cheong Wa Dae's announcement, the ruling Saenuri Party said it was the right decision while opposition groups denounced that it will only infuriate the people.

[Soundbite] Rep. Lee Cheol-woo (Spokesman, Saenuri Party) : "We clearly state that it must not be used for political purposes, just as we’ve been worrying about."

[Soundbite] Rep. Lee Un-ju (Spokeswoman, DUP) : "Rejecting the probe won’t help cover up irregularities; it’ll infuriate the people."

This is the second time Cheong Wa Dae has refused to extend a special counsel investigation, the first taking place in 2003 during the Roh Moo-hyun administration for the probe on former president Kim Dae-jung's alleged secret transmission of US$500 million to Pyongyang in return for the 2000 inter-Korean summit.

2. Other Hopefuls

[Anchor Lead]

The lion’s share of media attention during the run up to this year’s presidential election has been focused on the three main candidates. But there are other hopefuls as well, and they’re stepping up their efforts to turn the spotlight toward their quests for the presidency.

[Pkg]

Progressive Justice Party presidential candidate Shim Sang-jung is an incumbent lawmaker. She doesn't only stick to her constituency. Instead, she headed out to meet with laborers as part of her campaign trail. Shim presented five tasks to clean up the scandals that surfaced during the current government. She also called for bold economic and social reforms and the resolution of major labor issues. The Unified Progressive Party's presidential candidate Lee Jung-hee is actively working to reunify the progressive forces, seeking to overcome the repercussions from an election fraud scandal. She is pledging to create more labor unions. She also wants to raise the maximum income tax rate and the minimum wage. Independent presidential candidates Kang Ji-won and lawyer Park Chan-jong formed a policy coalition. They call for the reform of politics, economy and society. They also gave their two cents to fellow politicians. Independent candidate Lee Kun-gae stresses a small but clean government. He also calls for uncorrupt public officials and politicians. Although they are not in the spotlight, the minor candidates are trying to win the voters’ support with their various ideological backgrounds as well as experimental and unusual campaign pledges.

3. Homeless in Need

[Anchor Lead]

The harshest season of the year for the homeless is rapidly approaching. Let’s take a look now at life on the streets of Seoul.

[Pkg]

There are dozens of the homeless in the underpass in front of Seoul Station. They try to block the cold breeze using only cardboard boxes. Some even sleep on a sidewalk outside.

[Soundbite] "(It's too cold. You should go to a shelter.) No."

The homeless have to endure the winter in cold streets. They need to be provided with stable jobs and housing so they can get back on their feet and become self-sufficient. Yu Sang-hui was a homeless man five years ago, but now, he runs a cleaning company. He happened to work as a cleaner and began to enjoy the job, which allowed him to escape the life of a homeless.

[Soundbite] Yu Sang-hui (CEO, Cleaning Company) : "I believe that giving them opportunities to start a new life is important, than trying to remove the homeless people from the streets."

Of the Seoul government's budget of US$38 million for the homeless this year, only US$7.2 million was set aside for helping them find jobs and return to a normal life. Homeless people live on the streets without hope but may be able to get back on their feet if given the chance.

4. Premature Babies

[Anchor Lead]

The number of premature babies has soared in the nation in recent years as women wait longer to have their first child.

[Pkg]

This premature baby was born during the sixth month stage of pregnancy. The baby weighs 750 grams and is only 32 centimeters tall. The newborn needs the help of an incubator to receive oxygen and nutrients. Premature babies, who are born before the 37th week of pregnancy, now account for more than eight percent of all newborns in the nation. The main factors behind the trend include the older age of women giving birth to their first child as a result of getting married later in life as well as the growing number of twins stemming from in vitro fertilizations. Parents of premature babies have to pay a hefty price to use the incubators and get medicine, without which the preemies cannot survive as they have weak immune systems due to their underdeveloped respiratory organs and nervous system. The survival rate for premature babies who weigh under 1.5 kilograms exceeds 87 percent, but the average health care costs needed to help them survive reach 16,000 U.S. dollars per preemie. Health insurance does not cover medical care for premature babies, which explains the heavy financial burden of parents. In fact, 85 percent of mothers of preemies say that they face serious financial problems, with about half of them feeling guilty.

[Soundbite] Bae Jong-wu (The Korean Society of Neonatology) : "I believe that by giving these babies good treatment and helping them survive, we can overcome the low birthrate and encourage our demographic power."

In the era of a plunging birthrate, premature babies and their families are in desperate need of help from society.

5. Book Ads

[Anchor Lead]

The list of best sellers and recommended books play a major role in consumer decisions on book buying Web sites. But on the nation's largest online bookstores, it turns out that spots on such lists are for sale.

[Pkg]

This is the homepage of Korea's largest online bookstore. The list of bestsellers appears in the right-hand corner of the page. This online bookstore displayed the list of newly recommended books for a week in early May. The books were picked not based on reader reviews but on advertisements exceeding US$2,000 that the bookstore received from publishers. The Fair Trade Commission caught four large online bookstores that received advertisement money from publishers in return for recommending their books to customers. The amount depended on where the advertisement was displayed and its image size.

[Soundbite] Seong Gyeong-je (Fair Trade Commission) : "This constitutes an act of fraud because the online bookstores gave the false impression that they were recommending books evaluated by their quality."

The publishers claim they advertised their books in this manner to catch the eyes of readers. But others are saying that books recommended by bookstores mislead customers making them look like they’re of high quality or selling well. The Fair Trade Commission has ordered the four online bookstores to take corrective measures and levied US$23,000 in fines, but it remains to be seen if the act of publishers advertising their books by confusing readers will be gone for good.

6. Eatery Closing

[Anchor Lead]

There is a restaurant in Korea where customers can have as much food as they want and pay as much as they can afford. It's a social enterprise called "Eateries without thresholds" (or “Eateries with Borders” in English), but it's now on the verge of closing.

[Pkg]

The kitchen staff is busy cooking. Many people visit this eatery because at this restaurant, they can eat as much as they want while paying as much as they can afford. It's a social enterprise called Wolf Place in English, but the direct translation of its Korean name is "Eatery without Threshold." Each customer here usually pays around $2.70 to $3.60 per meal. But it costs more than 7 U.S. dollars to prepare just one serving since the eatery uses only organic ingredients to promote an eco-friendly lifestyle. The owner of the restaurant eventually decided to close the place because of its snowballing losses. The customers, most of whom struggle financially, were discouraged upon hearing the news.

[Soundbite] "I pay more when business is good, and less when it's not. This is an ideal place for those like me. There’s no place to eat if it goes away; it should stay here."

The local residents have set up a committee to try to help the eatery survive. They hope that their efforts will help carry on the spirit of sharing during tough times.

7. Photo History

[Anchor Lead]

We go now to an exhibition of old photos owned by Seoul citizens that tell the story of the many dramatic changes the city has experienced.

[Pkg]

A foreigners' apartment was removed 18 years ago as part of the Seoul city government's project to restore the original landscape of Mount Nam. A child covers her ears at the sound of the detonation. A photo taken in front of the former National Museum offers a view of the Japanese colonial government building. This year's Seoul Photo Festival has reconstructed the history of Seoul using photos donated by its citizens.

[Soundbite] Lee Yeong-nam (Historian) : "The photos are private records and couldn't have been preserved properly if they weren't taken and owned by individuals. They are now open to the public and broaden the scope of history."

A tram runs through Namdaemun Street. A traditional Korean house can be seen with a signboard of a foreign beverage company on top. A cow tills in front of apartments in Apgujeong, now one of Seoul’s most affluent areas. Shacks are lined along the Cheonggye Stream. The pictures of professional photographers' recording the radical transformations Seoul has witnessed throughout its modernization will also be on display at the exhibition. The Seoul metropolitan government will accumulate and preserve the photos according to each district as historical materials.

8. `90s Rehash

[Anchor Lead]

In pop culture, an era may be over but it is never forgotten. The constant recycling of styles has creators in Korea now turning their focus to the ’90s.

[Pkg]

This movie drew in four million viewers. It is an unusual feat for a romantic movie. The strongest weapon of this movie is that it evokes people's memories. Rather than reliving the turbulent ‘80s, which was an age dominated by antigovernment protests and the smell of tear-gas bombs, it depicts the life of college students in the 1990s. The ‘90s era has returned to the cultural scene. Styles from the 1990s are having a great impact on the overall culture in Korea. An example is a joint comeback concert held by singers who were immensely popular until the mid-‘90s. Some cafes and bars use memorabilia from the 1990s, such as roller skates and LP records, for their interior decoration.

[Soundbite] "I like new contemporary music, but I come here to listen to music I grew up with to get that sense of nostalgia."

The return of the 1990s style and trend is linked to the emergence of the Seo Tae-ji generation as a main player and consumer in the cultural sector. The Seo Tae-ji generation refers to people who used be fans of super star singer Seo tae-ji in the ‘90s. Each generation faced distinctive troubles and harbored different ideas. With the return of the ‘90s, people are able to travel back in time and relive those years.

9. New Dos

[Anchor Lead]

We live in the age of plastic surgery in Korea, but before you decide to go under the knife, consider what a difference a new hairdo can make.

[Pkg]

In Korea, there is a standard middle-aged woman’s haircut that many ladies opt for.

[Soundbite] "I always have short hair with strong curls. It lasts for about three months. I can save money."

But a small change to your hairstyle can make you look ten years younger.

[Soundbite] Taeyang (Hairdresser) : "Bobs are trendy this fall. Actresses like Park Si-yeon and Kim Hye-su have bobs."

This lady goes for a trendy bob. Volume is a key aspect of a bob. And they say lighter dye jobs are better. With the addition of some bangs, her new look is complete.

[Soundbite] "My forehead was always showing. Now, half of it is hidden and the hair is full. My face looks smaller. I love it."

Here are some simple tips for jazzing up your hairstyle without paying a penny.

[Soundbite] Cha Hong (Hairdresser) : "Hello, I'm hairdresser Cha Hong. I’m going to give you some simple tips on competely changing your hairstyles without cuts and perms."

Weak, dry hair is the biggest hair issue for middle-aged women.

[Soundbite] "Put a brush on the hair and rub it."

Some touches to the roots give you a whole new style.

[Soundbite] "Hair lies in zigzags. This is to puff it up. The more you rub it, the fuller it will get."

Blowing drying your roots gives your hair a fuller look.

[Soundbite] "I feel like I can go out with my hair styled like this every day. It’s easy and makes my hair thick."

This woman thinks she’s starting to look old, and isn’t happy with the roundness of her face and the state of her cheeks.

[Soundbite] "Facial lifting effects are really important to women. The same goes for hair. Giving volume and a lifiting effect to hair will make you look young, definitely."

Rollers are a cheap way to give your hairstyle new life.

[Soundbite] "Put a roller in the middle of the hair and turn it from the end."

For ladies with rounder faces, tying the hair up high is a good option.

[Soundbite] "Leave some hair on the sides"

And a bit of extra volume can make your face look slimmer.

[Soundbite] "My bang used to be flat; I didn't puff them up. The curled, round bangs make my forehead look like Jjang-gu’s. I look cute. It looks as if I got a shot of botox on my forehead."

Many women don’t realize what a difference a little extra attention to your hairdo can make to your confidence.
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