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Elusive Merger
입력 2012.11.22 (16:39) News Today
자동재생
동영상영역 시작
동영상영역 끝
[Anchor Lead]



Moon Jae-in and Ahn Cheol-soo conducted a televised debate on the 21st on ways to merge their candidacies, but discussions that took place today eventually broke down.



[Pkg]



Presidential contenders Moon Jae-in of the Democratic United Party and independent candidate Ahn Cheol-soo met today from 10 in the morning to discuss ways of unifying their candidacies, but could not come to an agreement. During the televised debate on the 21st, Moon said that the negotiations so far have failed in producing a single candidate and isn’t giving the public a clear answer. The working-level team has for now, discontinued holding discussions. Moon’s side revealed that he wished for just both candidates to have a discussion amongst themselves to overcome any obstacles and disagreements for unifying their candidacies, while Ahn’s side expected both contenders to come to an agreement by meeting together and working on methods that are approved by the people. Moon’s side claimed that Moon led yesterdays’ televised debate in a stable manner and made better remarks for both the general issues and the specific ones. Ahn’s campaign said that Ahn’s more considerate attitude and his honest answers to communicate better with the people were more impressive.



2. Saenuri Fights Back



[Anchor Lead]



The ruling Saenuri Party has downplayed the opposition debate, saying that Moon and Ahn failed to show their presidential qualifications.



[Pkg]



The ruling Saenuri Party said that the debate between the two opposition presidential candidates, Moon Jae-in and Ahn Cheol-soo, was more boring and duller than expected. The party said that the two had failed to prove their qualifications and experiences needed to be strong presidential candidates.



[Soundbite] Ahn Hyung-hwan (Spokesman, Saenuri Party): “What they discussed was common sense with vague questions and answers. We didn’t see any qualifications, experiences or concerns worthy of a presidential candidate.”



The campaign committee of the ruling party stepped up its attack on Moon and Ahn, highlighting the negative images stemming from their single candidacy talks. Saenuri Party campaign chief Kim Moo-sung said in a meeting of the party campaign committee on Wednesday that the power struggle between the Moon and Ahn camps will result in the failure to properly manage state affairs and the people’ livelihood. Saenuri Party presidential candidate Park Geun-hye is countering the headwind of the opposition single candidacy talks by announcing more campaign pledges. She is promising to ban schools from setting test questions beyond their curricula, which she said is a main reason why parents turn to private tutors and afterschool learning institutions. Park said that violators will face grave disadvantages. The ruling party presidential contender also pledges to operate so-called "all-day school" programs for working mothers.



[Soundbite] Rep. Park Geun-hye (Saenuri Party Presidential Candidate): “I’ll by all means keep my education campaign pledges by providing pleasant education for students and give them hopes and dreams.”



In a meeting with retired police officers on November 21st, Park promised to give the police force the right to independent investigations.



3. Noise Wars



[Anchor Lead]



Korea is one of the world’s most densely populated nations, and noise pollution is an issue that comes with the territory. Last month, two neighbors living above and below each other came to blows because of noise complaints. A mediation committee exists, but isn’t helping. Here’s why.



[Pkg]



This man moved into his new apartment a year ago, but couldn’t have peace and quiet for even a day because of the racket coming from upstairs. He tried talking with the neighbor and even called the police but to no avail. A center that receives reports on apartment noise between floors, which opened in March, received more than 5,000 inquiries through late October. The majority of the noise issues came from footsteps and running and jumping children. When an adult male walks around in an apartment, the noise downstairs is measured to be 43 decibels, and when he jumps up and down, it’s 52 decibels. Sounds at such volumes are unbearable at night. Up until now, the noise dispute mediation committee has never charged compensation for these disturbances. This is because of the strict noise standards. Accordingly, the Ministry of Environment is planning to lower the noise standard during the day from 55 decibels to 40, and from 45 decibels to 35 during the night. The measurement period will also be shortened from an average of five minutes to about one minute. However, since most apartment floors are poor when it comes to muffling sounds, the lowered standards are expected to raise more disputes between neighbors.



4. Cafe Overdose



[Anchor Lead]



Korea is thick with coffee shops, to the point where their number has become a serious business problem. Now, new rules on opening chain cafes are being put in place.



[Pkg]



This is the Seoul district around the Gangnam subway station. Coffee shops can be spotted almost everywhere. They are side by side in buildings that are right next to each other and in narrow alleys as well. There are more than 90 coffee shops in a 500 meter radius. Two coffee shops from the same franchise are located just across the street from each other. In the area around this four-way stop intersection, there are five coffee shops of the same brand. At least 20 to more than 30 percent of the coffee shops within a 500 meter radius are of the same company. The five leading companies operating shops under an affiliate store system have seen the number of their stores nearly double in the last two years. To prevent damages due to the mushrooming of coffee shops, the government is applying a measure like those used to regulate competition amongst bakeries, fried chicken restaurants and pizza chains. Under the rule, no more than one store of the same franchise can operate within a 500 meter radius. The measure is to be applied to the top five coffee chains, including Caffe Bene, Angel in us, Hollys Coffee, Tom N Toms and A Twosome Place. Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf and Starbucks stores that are run under direct management are excluded from the rule. But many doubt how effective the standard will be considering the already saturated market and the areas with a large population of people.



5. Tourist Milestone



[Anchor Lead]



Korea has broken the ten million tourist mark for the first time this year. But there are still many tourism industry challenges that the country needs to work on.



[Pkg]



Korea greets its 10 millionth tourist at Incheon Airport



[Soundbite] Li Tingting (10 Millionth Tourist): “I came to Korea with my mother. This is my first visit. I’m happy and honored to be the 10 millionth tourist.”



This is the first time the nation drew over ten million tourists in a year. Chinese tourists and the spread of the Korean pop culture boom known as “hallyu” are the driving forces behind this milestone for Korea. Tourists come to catch a glimpse of Korean stars that they like. They stop by at a cafe, which was the main setting of a popular Korean drama. The number of Chinese tourists to Korea has been growing phenomenally and has attracted six times more Chinese than Japanese people. But the nation still needs to work on improving the quality of tourism and travel-related services. 27 percent of tourists complained about inconveniences they experienced when shopping while 17 percent expressed dissatisfaction with travel agencies. Travel agencies offer tours for cheap, but they force tourists to shop at stores that are under contracts with them to make up for the losses. A shortage of hotel rooms is also an issue. Hotels are working to increase their rooms, but the reality is that Seoul ranks 101 among major international cities when it comes to the number of hotel rooms. The nation’s success of attracting more than ten million tourists is good news, but it poses other tasks for Korea.



6. Bathhouse Thieves



[Anchor Lead]



Korea’s public bathhouses, where people go to soak and relax, are also hotbeds of theft.



[Pkg]



This is a public sauna in Guro-dong, Seoul. As a female customer steps away from her seat, a couple stealthily approaches the lady’s spot. While the man stands watch, his female partner steals the smartphone and credit cards of the lady who left her seat momentarily. In another public sauna, it takes a thief just 20 seconds to steal a smartphone from a sleeping customer. In these public bathhouses, a lot of customers fall fast asleep, not paying attention to their smartphones and their other personal belongings. They also carelessly wrap their locker keys around their wrists. Such individuals are sitting duck for thieves. However, warnings against theft are useless.



[Soundbite] Public Sauna Employee: “We always warn customers to be careful with their smartphones and wallets, but young people don’t listen.”



People often go to the public saunas and bathhouses to relax and to help fight their fatigue. But they can be easy targets for thieves if they are caught off guard even for an instant.



7. Surveillance Tech



[Anchor Lead]



Security cameras are ubiquitous in Korea, and now domestic researchers have developed a sound-detecting surveillance camera system. Here’s how it works.



[Pkg]



These days, surveillance cameras can be seen almost everywhere. However, since the cameras are fixed to shoot in just one direction and no sounds can be recorded, figuring out the exact situation of the footage is not so easy. However, this newly developed security camera turns according to the sounds it detects. It was developed by the Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science and has three microphones installed which function like the human ear. The camera turns automatically in the direction where the noise is coming from. It’s a large improvement from existing security cameras. It can also be set to sound an alarm allowing for a quicker inspection of the scene.



[Soundbite] Gwon Hyu-sang (Korea Research Institute of Standards & Science): “If there’s an unusual noise, the camera turns in that direction and sounds an alarm.”



It also has infrared imaging and can detect the sources of noise 24-hours a day and record them. Talks are already underway to transfer the technology as the camera can be used for various purposes such as crime prevention and by the military.



8. Korean-Style Education



[Anchor Lead]



An American public school in Harlem has become one of the top schools in New York after adopting Korean education methods.



[Pkg]



Even though these students say a Korean greeting a bit clumsily, they say it with enthusiasm.



[Soundbite] “Hello Ms. K.”



After school, the students learn a traditional Korean mask dance and folk songs. Their school is a small one located in Harlem in New York City. Although it was founded not too long ago, over the past four years, it has been ranked as one of the top schools in Manhattan in terms of the students’ academic ability evaluations. This achievement was able to come about due to the institution’s adoption of the Korean saying in regards to education that nothing is impossible if you try hard enough. Around 30 of the school’s students visited Korea. They came to see and experience the Korean education culture and learn the secrets to educational success.



[Soundbite] “Micheal Cummings (12th Grade, Democracy Prep Public Charter School)”



The students learned a lot about the passions that drive Koreans as well as Korean manners and etiquette.



[Soundbite] “Seth Andrew (Prinicipal, Democracy Prep Public Charter School)”



The students returned to the U.S. after their two week stay in the country. Next year, a larger group of students are planning to come for the trip to Korea.



9. Lie Down Diet



[Anchor Lead]



In the massive drive to lose weight, the holy grail is the method that lets you do nothing while watching the pounds melt away. Well, today, we bring you the lie down diet.



[Pkg]



Yang Eun-young says she packed on 15 kilograms in just a year. But she’s so busy in her daily life that she has trouble putting her finger on the reason she’s gained so much.



[Soundbite] Yang Eun-yeong (Housewife): “People say I eat less compared to how I look. And since I have two kids, I have housework to do and have to take care of my kids so I’m not just sitting around. I can’t figure out the reason.”



We had her visit an expert to find out what’s going on. The specialist studies Yang’s daily routine carefully and points out something about her sleeping habits.



[Soundbite] “You sleep mostly with your legs bent. And you also place your arm under your head a lot.”



They measure her brain activity while sleeping. The brain waves grow bigger whenever she tosses and turns.



[Soundbite] Prof. Lee Hyang-un (Ewha Womans Univ. Medical Center): “We found out that you can’t fall asleep easily and when you wake up a lot, you can’t sleep deeply. The sleep-inducing hormone melatonin not only helps you fall asleep, but also boosts fat metabolism to help you feel full when eating, and it also helps in burning fat cells. If you can’t sleep deeply, these effects don’t take place and cause obesity.”



In addition, bad sleeping postures can also contribute to weight gain. Sleeping with your knees up hinders blood circulation in the legs and can be a cause of lower-body obesity. If you sleep with your mouth open, you tend to breathe with your chest instead of your abdomen. This can weaken your abs and lead to abdominal obesity. We met another woman who says she lost weight after correcting her sleeping habits.



[Soundbite] “You came to see my mom right? She’s dieting right now.”



This lying around is actually part of her diet.



[Soundbite] “This is the lazybones diet you do by just lying down.”



Seo Yeong-sil says she weighed 78 kilograms just three months ago. Now she’s down to 52.



[Soundbite] Seo Yeong-sil (Housewife): “I tried all kinds of exercise and dietary methods but to no avail. I experienced a lot of yo-yo effects, too. But I found when I slept well, I easily lost weight. I realized sleeping well was the best way to diet.”



She binds her big toes together with a rubber band so she can maintain a straight posture while sleeping.



[Soundbite] “If you sleep with your body stretched out straight, it helps the whole body’s blood circulation and helps prevent swelling or obesity in certain parts of the body. As such, it’s a very good sleeping habit.”



Seo also never forgets to exercise before going to sleep.



[Soundbite] “Before I sleep I do this 100 times every day. It’s good for blood circulation and it also helps me get a deep sleep.”



If you find yourself continually failing to drop those extra pounds, getting a good night’s sleep could be the answer to your troubles.
  • Elusive Merger
    • 입력 2012-11-22 16:39:40
    News Today
[Anchor Lead]



Moon Jae-in and Ahn Cheol-soo conducted a televised debate on the 21st on ways to merge their candidacies, but discussions that took place today eventually broke down.



[Pkg]



Presidential contenders Moon Jae-in of the Democratic United Party and independent candidate Ahn Cheol-soo met today from 10 in the morning to discuss ways of unifying their candidacies, but could not come to an agreement. During the televised debate on the 21st, Moon said that the negotiations so far have failed in producing a single candidate and isn’t giving the public a clear answer. The working-level team has for now, discontinued holding discussions. Moon’s side revealed that he wished for just both candidates to have a discussion amongst themselves to overcome any obstacles and disagreements for unifying their candidacies, while Ahn’s side expected both contenders to come to an agreement by meeting together and working on methods that are approved by the people. Moon’s side claimed that Moon led yesterdays’ televised debate in a stable manner and made better remarks for both the general issues and the specific ones. Ahn’s campaign said that Ahn’s more considerate attitude and his honest answers to communicate better with the people were more impressive.



2. Saenuri Fights Back



[Anchor Lead]



The ruling Saenuri Party has downplayed the opposition debate, saying that Moon and Ahn failed to show their presidential qualifications.



[Pkg]



The ruling Saenuri Party said that the debate between the two opposition presidential candidates, Moon Jae-in and Ahn Cheol-soo, was more boring and duller than expected. The party said that the two had failed to prove their qualifications and experiences needed to be strong presidential candidates.



[Soundbite] Ahn Hyung-hwan (Spokesman, Saenuri Party): “What they discussed was common sense with vague questions and answers. We didn’t see any qualifications, experiences or concerns worthy of a presidential candidate.”



The campaign committee of the ruling party stepped up its attack on Moon and Ahn, highlighting the negative images stemming from their single candidacy talks. Saenuri Party campaign chief Kim Moo-sung said in a meeting of the party campaign committee on Wednesday that the power struggle between the Moon and Ahn camps will result in the failure to properly manage state affairs and the people’ livelihood. Saenuri Party presidential candidate Park Geun-hye is countering the headwind of the opposition single candidacy talks by announcing more campaign pledges. She is promising to ban schools from setting test questions beyond their curricula, which she said is a main reason why parents turn to private tutors and afterschool learning institutions. Park said that violators will face grave disadvantages. The ruling party presidential contender also pledges to operate so-called "all-day school" programs for working mothers.



[Soundbite] Rep. Park Geun-hye (Saenuri Party Presidential Candidate): “I’ll by all means keep my education campaign pledges by providing pleasant education for students and give them hopes and dreams.”



In a meeting with retired police officers on November 21st, Park promised to give the police force the right to independent investigations.



3. Noise Wars



[Anchor Lead]



Korea is one of the world’s most densely populated nations, and noise pollution is an issue that comes with the territory. Last month, two neighbors living above and below each other came to blows because of noise complaints. A mediation committee exists, but isn’t helping. Here’s why.



[Pkg]



This man moved into his new apartment a year ago, but couldn’t have peace and quiet for even a day because of the racket coming from upstairs. He tried talking with the neighbor and even called the police but to no avail. A center that receives reports on apartment noise between floors, which opened in March, received more than 5,000 inquiries through late October. The majority of the noise issues came from footsteps and running and jumping children. When an adult male walks around in an apartment, the noise downstairs is measured to be 43 decibels, and when he jumps up and down, it’s 52 decibels. Sounds at such volumes are unbearable at night. Up until now, the noise dispute mediation committee has never charged compensation for these disturbances. This is because of the strict noise standards. Accordingly, the Ministry of Environment is planning to lower the noise standard during the day from 55 decibels to 40, and from 45 decibels to 35 during the night. The measurement period will also be shortened from an average of five minutes to about one minute. However, since most apartment floors are poor when it comes to muffling sounds, the lowered standards are expected to raise more disputes between neighbors.



4. Cafe Overdose



[Anchor Lead]



Korea is thick with coffee shops, to the point where their number has become a serious business problem. Now, new rules on opening chain cafes are being put in place.



[Pkg]



This is the Seoul district around the Gangnam subway station. Coffee shops can be spotted almost everywhere. They are side by side in buildings that are right next to each other and in narrow alleys as well. There are more than 90 coffee shops in a 500 meter radius. Two coffee shops from the same franchise are located just across the street from each other. In the area around this four-way stop intersection, there are five coffee shops of the same brand. At least 20 to more than 30 percent of the coffee shops within a 500 meter radius are of the same company. The five leading companies operating shops under an affiliate store system have seen the number of their stores nearly double in the last two years. To prevent damages due to the mushrooming of coffee shops, the government is applying a measure like those used to regulate competition amongst bakeries, fried chicken restaurants and pizza chains. Under the rule, no more than one store of the same franchise can operate within a 500 meter radius. The measure is to be applied to the top five coffee chains, including Caffe Bene, Angel in us, Hollys Coffee, Tom N Toms and A Twosome Place. Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf and Starbucks stores that are run under direct management are excluded from the rule. But many doubt how effective the standard will be considering the already saturated market and the areas with a large population of people.



5. Tourist Milestone



[Anchor Lead]



Korea has broken the ten million tourist mark for the first time this year. But there are still many tourism industry challenges that the country needs to work on.



[Pkg]



Korea greets its 10 millionth tourist at Incheon Airport



[Soundbite] Li Tingting (10 Millionth Tourist): “I came to Korea with my mother. This is my first visit. I’m happy and honored to be the 10 millionth tourist.”



This is the first time the nation drew over ten million tourists in a year. Chinese tourists and the spread of the Korean pop culture boom known as “hallyu” are the driving forces behind this milestone for Korea. Tourists come to catch a glimpse of Korean stars that they like. They stop by at a cafe, which was the main setting of a popular Korean drama. The number of Chinese tourists to Korea has been growing phenomenally and has attracted six times more Chinese than Japanese people. But the nation still needs to work on improving the quality of tourism and travel-related services. 27 percent of tourists complained about inconveniences they experienced when shopping while 17 percent expressed dissatisfaction with travel agencies. Travel agencies offer tours for cheap, but they force tourists to shop at stores that are under contracts with them to make up for the losses. A shortage of hotel rooms is also an issue. Hotels are working to increase their rooms, but the reality is that Seoul ranks 101 among major international cities when it comes to the number of hotel rooms. The nation’s success of attracting more than ten million tourists is good news, but it poses other tasks for Korea.



6. Bathhouse Thieves



[Anchor Lead]



Korea’s public bathhouses, where people go to soak and relax, are also hotbeds of theft.



[Pkg]



This is a public sauna in Guro-dong, Seoul. As a female customer steps away from her seat, a couple stealthily approaches the lady’s spot. While the man stands watch, his female partner steals the smartphone and credit cards of the lady who left her seat momentarily. In another public sauna, it takes a thief just 20 seconds to steal a smartphone from a sleeping customer. In these public bathhouses, a lot of customers fall fast asleep, not paying attention to their smartphones and their other personal belongings. They also carelessly wrap their locker keys around their wrists. Such individuals are sitting duck for thieves. However, warnings against theft are useless.



[Soundbite] Public Sauna Employee: “We always warn customers to be careful with their smartphones and wallets, but young people don’t listen.”



People often go to the public saunas and bathhouses to relax and to help fight their fatigue. But they can be easy targets for thieves if they are caught off guard even for an instant.



7. Surveillance Tech



[Anchor Lead]



Security cameras are ubiquitous in Korea, and now domestic researchers have developed a sound-detecting surveillance camera system. Here’s how it works.



[Pkg]



These days, surveillance cameras can be seen almost everywhere. However, since the cameras are fixed to shoot in just one direction and no sounds can be recorded, figuring out the exact situation of the footage is not so easy. However, this newly developed security camera turns according to the sounds it detects. It was developed by the Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science and has three microphones installed which function like the human ear. The camera turns automatically in the direction where the noise is coming from. It’s a large improvement from existing security cameras. It can also be set to sound an alarm allowing for a quicker inspection of the scene.



[Soundbite] Gwon Hyu-sang (Korea Research Institute of Standards & Science): “If there’s an unusual noise, the camera turns in that direction and sounds an alarm.”



It also has infrared imaging and can detect the sources of noise 24-hours a day and record them. Talks are already underway to transfer the technology as the camera can be used for various purposes such as crime prevention and by the military.



8. Korean-Style Education



[Anchor Lead]



An American public school in Harlem has become one of the top schools in New York after adopting Korean education methods.



[Pkg]



Even though these students say a Korean greeting a bit clumsily, they say it with enthusiasm.



[Soundbite] “Hello Ms. K.”



After school, the students learn a traditional Korean mask dance and folk songs. Their school is a small one located in Harlem in New York City. Although it was founded not too long ago, over the past four years, it has been ranked as one of the top schools in Manhattan in terms of the students’ academic ability evaluations. This achievement was able to come about due to the institution’s adoption of the Korean saying in regards to education that nothing is impossible if you try hard enough. Around 30 of the school’s students visited Korea. They came to see and experience the Korean education culture and learn the secrets to educational success.



[Soundbite] “Micheal Cummings (12th Grade, Democracy Prep Public Charter School)”



The students learned a lot about the passions that drive Koreans as well as Korean manners and etiquette.



[Soundbite] “Seth Andrew (Prinicipal, Democracy Prep Public Charter School)”



The students returned to the U.S. after their two week stay in the country. Next year, a larger group of students are planning to come for the trip to Korea.



9. Lie Down Diet



[Anchor Lead]



In the massive drive to lose weight, the holy grail is the method that lets you do nothing while watching the pounds melt away. Well, today, we bring you the lie down diet.



[Pkg]



Yang Eun-young says she packed on 15 kilograms in just a year. But she’s so busy in her daily life that she has trouble putting her finger on the reason she’s gained so much.



[Soundbite] Yang Eun-yeong (Housewife): “People say I eat less compared to how I look. And since I have two kids, I have housework to do and have to take care of my kids so I’m not just sitting around. I can’t figure out the reason.”



We had her visit an expert to find out what’s going on. The specialist studies Yang’s daily routine carefully and points out something about her sleeping habits.



[Soundbite] “You sleep mostly with your legs bent. And you also place your arm under your head a lot.”



They measure her brain activity while sleeping. The brain waves grow bigger whenever she tosses and turns.



[Soundbite] Prof. Lee Hyang-un (Ewha Womans Univ. Medical Center): “We found out that you can’t fall asleep easily and when you wake up a lot, you can’t sleep deeply. The sleep-inducing hormone melatonin not only helps you fall asleep, but also boosts fat metabolism to help you feel full when eating, and it also helps in burning fat cells. If you can’t sleep deeply, these effects don’t take place and cause obesity.”



In addition, bad sleeping postures can also contribute to weight gain. Sleeping with your knees up hinders blood circulation in the legs and can be a cause of lower-body obesity. If you sleep with your mouth open, you tend to breathe with your chest instead of your abdomen. This can weaken your abs and lead to abdominal obesity. We met another woman who says she lost weight after correcting her sleeping habits.



[Soundbite] “You came to see my mom right? She’s dieting right now.”



This lying around is actually part of her diet.



[Soundbite] “This is the lazybones diet you do by just lying down.”



Seo Yeong-sil says she weighed 78 kilograms just three months ago. Now she’s down to 52.



[Soundbite] Seo Yeong-sil (Housewife): “I tried all kinds of exercise and dietary methods but to no avail. I experienced a lot of yo-yo effects, too. But I found when I slept well, I easily lost weight. I realized sleeping well was the best way to diet.”



She binds her big toes together with a rubber band so she can maintain a straight posture while sleeping.



[Soundbite] “If you sleep with your body stretched out straight, it helps the whole body’s blood circulation and helps prevent swelling or obesity in certain parts of the body. As such, it’s a very good sleeping habit.”



Seo also never forgets to exercise before going to sleep.



[Soundbite] “Before I sleep I do this 100 times every day. It’s good for blood circulation and it also helps me get a deep sleep.”



If you find yourself continually failing to drop those extra pounds, getting a good night’s sleep could be the answer to your troubles.
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