기사 본문 영역

상세페이지

Prosecution Reform
입력 2012.12.04 (15:22) 수정 2012.12.04 (15:44) News Today
자동재생
동영상영역 시작
동영상영역 끝
[Anchor Lead]

With the nation’s prosecution embroiled in a series of scandals, the two leading presidential candidates have taken the opportunity to pledge overhauls of the institution. Both hopefuls have their sights set on doing away with the central investigation department.

[Pkg]

Calls are mounting for the reform of the prosecution in the wake of bribery and sex scandals involving prosecutors and internal strife inside the organization. Ruling Saenuri Party presidential candidate Park Geun-hye and main opposition Democratic United Party candidate Moon Jae-in announced measures to reform the prosecution on the same day. Both candidates attributed the public’s distrust of the prosecution to some prosecutors' desire to have good connections with politicians.

[Soundbite] Park Geun-hye(Saenuri Party Presidential Candidate) : "I vow to never use prosecutors or unfairly influence them for myself or for political purposes."

[Soundbite] Moon Jae-in(DUP Presidential Candidate) : "Prosecutors have lost political neutrality and they possess power over the people. It’s now time to reform them."

The two candidates also promised to abolish the central investigation department of the Supreme Public Prosecutor's Office as a way to ensure the political neutrality of prosecutors. Park and Moon pledged to reduce the investigative functions of the prosecution and separate the prosecutors' right to investigate from their right to indict. They also promised to cut the number of senior prosecutors. One more measure the two candidates both support is extending a ban on former prosecutors accused of corruption charges from opening lawyer offices. But they also show differences regarding some reformative measures. Park proposed introducing a standing special prosecutor as a way of curbing the power of prosecutors. Moon, on the other hand, proposed forming an agency that would be given the task of investigating corruption cases surrounding high-ranking officials. Regarding the appointment of the prosecutor general, the ruling party presidential hopeful proposed upgrading the status of a committee recommending candidates for the head prosecutor and strengthening the parliamentary confirmation hearing procedures. The opposition contender suggested that the post of the prosecutor general be open to outside figures, and the chief prosecutor be required to attend parliamentary inspections. Park proposed abolishing the seniority-based promotion practice for prosecutors while Moon suggested reflecting the prosecutors' records of failing to prove the guilt of defendants for their future promotions. With the two leading presidential candidates having presented these tough reformative measures, it is clear that the next administration is intent on overhauling the prosecution.

2. Energy Crisis Looms

[Anchor Lead]

Experts are forecasting one of the nation’s worst-ever power crises this winter, and special government measures have gone into effect.

[Pkg]

This is Myeong-dong, one of Seoul's largest shopping districts. Even though the weather is chilly, a lot of the stores leave their doors wide open. Inside the shops, all kinds of heating devices, including electric heaters, are turned on. From December 3, businesses will not be allowed to leave their doors open while their heating systems are in operation. Furthermore, there will be a measure put in place on some 65,000 buildings that consume a lot of energy, limiting their indoor temperature to a maximum of 20 degrees Celsius. This includes large buildings, such as department stores, large supermarkets, hotels and resorts. Meanwhile, hospitals and kindergartens are excluded. In the case of neon signs, only one can be turned on during the hours of peak power consumption, which is between five to seven p.m. In addition, 6,000 large businesses that use at least 3,000 kilowatts per month will have to reduce their power consumption for the months of January and February next year by three to 10 percent of the amount they use this month.

[Soundbite] Song Yu-jong(Min. of Knowledge Economy) : "Since a portion of the nuclear energy is being halted, an energy crisis with backup power falling below two million seems inevitable."

After a month’s grace period, the government is planning to charge fines of up to around 2,770 U.S. dollars to stores and firms violating the new regulations starting from January 7.

3. Housing Woes

[Anchor Lead]

Nearly 200 thousand Korean homeowners have been unable to pay off their mortgages even after auctioning off their apartments.

[Pkg]

There are 160 households in this apartment complex. In the past two years 40 of them had to sell their homes through auctions. This apartment was auctioned off at about US$267,000, just half of the appraised price. Its owner isn’t able to pay off his mortgage loan of US$443,000 even after selling his home. Financial authorities have found in a survey that 190,000 homeowners, mostly living in Seoul and surrounding areas, are burdened with undervalued apartments. The total amount of unpaid loans even after the homes are sold through auctions stand at US$12 billion.

[Soundbite] Lee Gi-yeon(Financial Supervisory Service) : "The recent housing market slump keeps increasing loans that exceed the loan-to-value rate."

Almost 40,000 mortgage holders have defaulted on their payments for at least a month. Tenants are also feeling the heat as homeowners see their home values plummet. According to one estimate, from 2010 to the first half of this year nearly 7,000 tenants were evicted without receiving back their security deposits after their rented homes were foreclosed. Both lenders and loan holders stand to lose as some analysts predict the number of over-mortgaged homes will increase by eight times if housing prices plunge by 36%.

4. Perfume Boom

[Anchor Lead]

Despite the tough economic times, perfume sales in Korea are booming. Here's why.

[Pkg]

This cosmetics counter at a large department store is crowded with young shoppers looking for new items ahead of the holiday gift-giving season.

[Soundbite] "If I smell good, I tend to be more confident and feel better."

As young people's interest in fragrances grow, a local cosmetics company has recently released six new lines, challenging foreign perfume makers. Leading perfume brands that occupy 80% of the world's fragrance market countered the move by rolling out 17 new products. Korea's perfume market has grown steadily, from 309 million U.S. dollars in 2009 to 334 million dollars last year. The market is projected to reach 415 million dollars this year. Women are willing to spend more for perfumes despite their tighter budgets because of the so-called "lipstick effect," a theory that says that during a recession, people want to generate noticeable effects without having to pay for expensive items.

[Soundbite] Kim Min-gi (Cosmetics Company) : "The cosmetics market is over-saturated, so many brands try to distinguish themselves with perfumes."

On average, perfume sales account for about 20% of the global cosmetics market. Currently, Korea only takes up a 5% market share. With Korea’s strong growth potential in the fragrance market, the competition between the local and imported perfume brands will be further fueled as the nation pushes forward into this particular product line.

5. Kindergarten Lotteries

[Anchor Lead]

Education is a battleground in Korea, and parents who are planning to send their children to kindergarten next year are having a tough time getting their kids in.

[Pkg]

This year in Korea, a ping pong ball determines whether a child will get into a kindergarten. This public kindergarten is accepting 22 new children for the new school year that begins in March and some 160 children have applied.

[Soundbite] Lee Mi-hyeon (Parent) : "I prayed so desperately. I'm so sad I think I’m going to cry."

The kindergarten admission system has changed starting this year. Formerly, applicants were accepted on a first come, first served basis. Now, a lottery system is being used but causes parents to make multiple applications, raising the competition rate. Kindergartens in the same district have set the lottery on the same date causing the whole family to split up and attend the lotteries at different locations.

[Soundbite] Seok Ho-hyeon(Korea Kindergarten Association) : "If the lotteries are set on different dates, applicants tend to crowd in at a certain kindergarten. If it’s not handled carefully, this could lead to the ranking of kindergartens."

This year, around 1.4 million children nationwide are eligible to apply for kindergarten, but facilities can only receive around 610,000 new students. To make matters worse, the number of applicants increased this year with the expansion of government child care support for five-year-olds. Experts say to resolve the chaotic kindergarten application process, increasing the number of facilities is more urgent than changing the admission system.

6. Itchy Skin

[Anchor Lead]

Itchy skin is a common symptom during Korea’s dry, cold winter. Here are some tips on how to prevent it.

[Pkg]

This patient in her 30s says her skin gets itchy and stings every winter. Her continuous scratching has caused her skin to turn red and rough. The itchiness people feel is common during winter. This problem is due to the skin’s lack of moisture as a result of the drier weather conditions. The symptoms worsen with age. Most patients that seek hospital treatment for itchiness were males and females who are 80 years old and older, followed by those in their 70s and then those in their 60s. As the senior population is booming, the number of patients suffering from itchiness is also increasing every year by at least six percent.

[Soundbite] Dr. Kim Hui-jung(Dermatologist) : "It depends on the skin barrier. With age, the barrier weakens and so the skin loses moisture more easily."

The dry weather not only causes itchiness, but it also breaks down the skin's elasticity, forming wrinkles around a person’s eyes and mouth. The best way to prevent dryness and wrinkles is by applying sufficient amounts of moisturizers frequently. Additionally, taking too many baths can often worsen the symptoms. Doctors also advise people to drink at least eight glasses of water a day and maintain the indoor humidity at around 60 percent by using humidifiers.

7. Eyesore Removal

[Anchor Lead]

Mount Songni is known for its stunning scenery, but the beautiful landscape has been marred by communications towers. But now the eyesores are set to be removed by the end of the year.

[Pkg]

Winter has come to Mount Songni, but spots of green can still be detected along its ridges and on the slopes. The rocky cliffs are adorned by the evergreens. The early morning calm is shattered by a white-backed woodpecker, busy searching for food to fatten up for the coming winter. This is mistletoe, a hemi-parasitic plant that both photosynthesizes and lives off of a tree Some endangered animals are spotted as well, indicating that the mountain's ecosystem is well-preserved. On top of Munjangdae, 1,000 meters above sea level, workers are busy taking down a communications tower. An unobstructed view opened up when the workers removed the 40-meter tall steel tower that has been an eyesore for the past 44 years. Nine of the ten towers due for removal have already been demolished. The tower wreckage will be moved to the lower ground by a helicopter sometime next spring.

[Soundbite] Lee Jeong-yeong(National Park Service) : "In order to restore nature to its original state after removing the tower, we’ll harmonize the ecosystem with Munjangdae and other surrounding areas."

Now the challenge is to revive the ecosystem that had previously been damaged by the towers and artificial structures.

8. Fragrant Watercress

[Anchor Lead]

Fragrant watercress is used in lots of Korean dishes. And winter is the peak season for this aromatic ingredient.

[Pkg]

Despite the bone-chilling early winter wind, the harvest for watercress is in full swing. Workers are busy picking and washing the watercress, also known as water parsley, from the icy water. The harvested watercress is moved to a greenhouse to be cleaned and packaged before it is sent out to the market. Grown with clean water, watercress from Jeonju has tender stems and a vivid color, making it a colorful delicacy for winter meals.

[Soundbite] Kim Sun-ja(Watercress Farmer) : "Watercress from Jeonju is famous for not having any leeches, its good color, and for being clean and organic. The water is also unpolluted."

In the Jeonju area, some forty farmers grow the watercress on two million square meters of land. One of the eight delicacies of Jeonju, the watercress is popular all over the country. This winter alone, experts forecast that more than 2.76 million dollars' worth of watercress will be sold. The tasty and fragrant watercress from Jeonju is bringing more income and vitality to the local farmers.

9. Coffee Spots

[Anchor Lead]

. Over the course of a few years, Korea has gone from being a place where instant coffee was pretty much the only kind you could find, to a place where cafes are on every corner. Today we're going to take a look at some smaller coffee shops that have carved out their own niches in this saturated market.

[Pkg]

This little cafe near an elementary school is filled to the brim with unusual items.

[Soundbite] "There’s so much to see here. It's fun."

The coffee here is hand dripped. By the time the first cup is ready, the cafe is already packed with customers. The secret of the coffee is the charcoal roasting.

[Soundbite] Lee Hyeong-chun(Cafe Owner) : "The red sparks that look like far infrared rays generate heat. They help cook the coffee through for a deeper taste."

The most popular items on the menu are the kiln-baked hotteok, a type of sweet pancake.

[Soundbite] "They have a fun shape, they're not greasy and they’re very chewy."

The endless personal touches here have made this cafe a big hit in the neighborhood.

[Soundbite] "Even though it's small, I hope that while they’re having coffee, customers will be able to reminisce and bond with each other."

This cafe is a bit bigger, but is no ordinary coffee shop.

[Soundbite] "The owner is a dentist. I received treatment here."

The barista is also a dentist.

[Soundbite] "Even though I’m a dentist, I’m also a certified barista because I love coffee."

He spends his day shifting between his two roles.

[Soundbite] Dr. Kim Dong-seok(Dentist) : "It’s painful to wait in dental clinics. You can hear people crying inside and you're just scared it might hurt. So I’d like to let my customers wait in a more relaxed atmosphere."

After their consultation, visitors head to the nearby examination room. Everyone who comes to this dentist gets treated to a free cup of coffee, whether they get dental treatment or not.

[Soundbite] "A cup of coffee usually costs as much as a lunch. We come here to have some coffee after eating somewhere else. Then we go home."

This next place has a specific clientele.

[Soundbite] "No, no. Men aren’t allowed in here."

This cafe serves all kinds of herbal teas that are said to be good for women. It also specializes in herbal treatments that are especially for women.

[Soundbite] "I don't drink caffeine because it makes my hands shake, but here I can have herbal tea. I like it."

The customers sip tea as the herbs do their work. The owners claim that this helps ladies relieve stress and stay healthy.

[Soundbite] "This place is just for women. I like it because I can chat with others and enjoy warm tea and improve my health."

In a country where the coffee shop competition is beyond fierce, these cafes have found their competitive edge.
  • Prosecution Reform
    • 입력 2012-12-03 18:23:06
    • 수정2012-12-04 15:44:52
    News Today
[Anchor Lead]

With the nation’s prosecution embroiled in a series of scandals, the two leading presidential candidates have taken the opportunity to pledge overhauls of the institution. Both hopefuls have their sights set on doing away with the central investigation department.

[Pkg]

Calls are mounting for the reform of the prosecution in the wake of bribery and sex scandals involving prosecutors and internal strife inside the organization. Ruling Saenuri Party presidential candidate Park Geun-hye and main opposition Democratic United Party candidate Moon Jae-in announced measures to reform the prosecution on the same day. Both candidates attributed the public’s distrust of the prosecution to some prosecutors' desire to have good connections with politicians.

[Soundbite] Park Geun-hye(Saenuri Party Presidential Candidate) : "I vow to never use prosecutors or unfairly influence them for myself or for political purposes."

[Soundbite] Moon Jae-in(DUP Presidential Candidate) : "Prosecutors have lost political neutrality and they possess power over the people. It’s now time to reform them."

The two candidates also promised to abolish the central investigation department of the Supreme Public Prosecutor's Office as a way to ensure the political neutrality of prosecutors. Park and Moon pledged to reduce the investigative functions of the prosecution and separate the prosecutors' right to investigate from their right to indict. They also promised to cut the number of senior prosecutors. One more measure the two candidates both support is extending a ban on former prosecutors accused of corruption charges from opening lawyer offices. But they also show differences regarding some reformative measures. Park proposed introducing a standing special prosecutor as a way of curbing the power of prosecutors. Moon, on the other hand, proposed forming an agency that would be given the task of investigating corruption cases surrounding high-ranking officials. Regarding the appointment of the prosecutor general, the ruling party presidential hopeful proposed upgrading the status of a committee recommending candidates for the head prosecutor and strengthening the parliamentary confirmation hearing procedures. The opposition contender suggested that the post of the prosecutor general be open to outside figures, and the chief prosecutor be required to attend parliamentary inspections. Park proposed abolishing the seniority-based promotion practice for prosecutors while Moon suggested reflecting the prosecutors' records of failing to prove the guilt of defendants for their future promotions. With the two leading presidential candidates having presented these tough reformative measures, it is clear that the next administration is intent on overhauling the prosecution.

2. Energy Crisis Looms

[Anchor Lead]

Experts are forecasting one of the nation’s worst-ever power crises this winter, and special government measures have gone into effect.

[Pkg]

This is Myeong-dong, one of Seoul's largest shopping districts. Even though the weather is chilly, a lot of the stores leave their doors wide open. Inside the shops, all kinds of heating devices, including electric heaters, are turned on. From December 3, businesses will not be allowed to leave their doors open while their heating systems are in operation. Furthermore, there will be a measure put in place on some 65,000 buildings that consume a lot of energy, limiting their indoor temperature to a maximum of 20 degrees Celsius. This includes large buildings, such as department stores, large supermarkets, hotels and resorts. Meanwhile, hospitals and kindergartens are excluded. In the case of neon signs, only one can be turned on during the hours of peak power consumption, which is between five to seven p.m. In addition, 6,000 large businesses that use at least 3,000 kilowatts per month will have to reduce their power consumption for the months of January and February next year by three to 10 percent of the amount they use this month.

[Soundbite] Song Yu-jong(Min. of Knowledge Economy) : "Since a portion of the nuclear energy is being halted, an energy crisis with backup power falling below two million seems inevitable."

After a month’s grace period, the government is planning to charge fines of up to around 2,770 U.S. dollars to stores and firms violating the new regulations starting from January 7.

3. Housing Woes

[Anchor Lead]

Nearly 200 thousand Korean homeowners have been unable to pay off their mortgages even after auctioning off their apartments.

[Pkg]

There are 160 households in this apartment complex. In the past two years 40 of them had to sell their homes through auctions. This apartment was auctioned off at about US$267,000, just half of the appraised price. Its owner isn’t able to pay off his mortgage loan of US$443,000 even after selling his home. Financial authorities have found in a survey that 190,000 homeowners, mostly living in Seoul and surrounding areas, are burdened with undervalued apartments. The total amount of unpaid loans even after the homes are sold through auctions stand at US$12 billion.

[Soundbite] Lee Gi-yeon(Financial Supervisory Service) : "The recent housing market slump keeps increasing loans that exceed the loan-to-value rate."

Almost 40,000 mortgage holders have defaulted on their payments for at least a month. Tenants are also feeling the heat as homeowners see their home values plummet. According to one estimate, from 2010 to the first half of this year nearly 7,000 tenants were evicted without receiving back their security deposits after their rented homes were foreclosed. Both lenders and loan holders stand to lose as some analysts predict the number of over-mortgaged homes will increase by eight times if housing prices plunge by 36%.

4. Perfume Boom

[Anchor Lead]

Despite the tough economic times, perfume sales in Korea are booming. Here's why.

[Pkg]

This cosmetics counter at a large department store is crowded with young shoppers looking for new items ahead of the holiday gift-giving season.

[Soundbite] "If I smell good, I tend to be more confident and feel better."

As young people's interest in fragrances grow, a local cosmetics company has recently released six new lines, challenging foreign perfume makers. Leading perfume brands that occupy 80% of the world's fragrance market countered the move by rolling out 17 new products. Korea's perfume market has grown steadily, from 309 million U.S. dollars in 2009 to 334 million dollars last year. The market is projected to reach 415 million dollars this year. Women are willing to spend more for perfumes despite their tighter budgets because of the so-called "lipstick effect," a theory that says that during a recession, people want to generate noticeable effects without having to pay for expensive items.

[Soundbite] Kim Min-gi (Cosmetics Company) : "The cosmetics market is over-saturated, so many brands try to distinguish themselves with perfumes."

On average, perfume sales account for about 20% of the global cosmetics market. Currently, Korea only takes up a 5% market share. With Korea’s strong growth potential in the fragrance market, the competition between the local and imported perfume brands will be further fueled as the nation pushes forward into this particular product line.

5. Kindergarten Lotteries

[Anchor Lead]

Education is a battleground in Korea, and parents who are planning to send their children to kindergarten next year are having a tough time getting their kids in.

[Pkg]

This year in Korea, a ping pong ball determines whether a child will get into a kindergarten. This public kindergarten is accepting 22 new children for the new school year that begins in March and some 160 children have applied.

[Soundbite] Lee Mi-hyeon (Parent) : "I prayed so desperately. I'm so sad I think I’m going to cry."

The kindergarten admission system has changed starting this year. Formerly, applicants were accepted on a first come, first served basis. Now, a lottery system is being used but causes parents to make multiple applications, raising the competition rate. Kindergartens in the same district have set the lottery on the same date causing the whole family to split up and attend the lotteries at different locations.

[Soundbite] Seok Ho-hyeon(Korea Kindergarten Association) : "If the lotteries are set on different dates, applicants tend to crowd in at a certain kindergarten. If it’s not handled carefully, this could lead to the ranking of kindergartens."

This year, around 1.4 million children nationwide are eligible to apply for kindergarten, but facilities can only receive around 610,000 new students. To make matters worse, the number of applicants increased this year with the expansion of government child care support for five-year-olds. Experts say to resolve the chaotic kindergarten application process, increasing the number of facilities is more urgent than changing the admission system.

6. Itchy Skin

[Anchor Lead]

Itchy skin is a common symptom during Korea’s dry, cold winter. Here are some tips on how to prevent it.

[Pkg]

This patient in her 30s says her skin gets itchy and stings every winter. Her continuous scratching has caused her skin to turn red and rough. The itchiness people feel is common during winter. This problem is due to the skin’s lack of moisture as a result of the drier weather conditions. The symptoms worsen with age. Most patients that seek hospital treatment for itchiness were males and females who are 80 years old and older, followed by those in their 70s and then those in their 60s. As the senior population is booming, the number of patients suffering from itchiness is also increasing every year by at least six percent.

[Soundbite] Dr. Kim Hui-jung(Dermatologist) : "It depends on the skin barrier. With age, the barrier weakens and so the skin loses moisture more easily."

The dry weather not only causes itchiness, but it also breaks down the skin's elasticity, forming wrinkles around a person’s eyes and mouth. The best way to prevent dryness and wrinkles is by applying sufficient amounts of moisturizers frequently. Additionally, taking too many baths can often worsen the symptoms. Doctors also advise people to drink at least eight glasses of water a day and maintain the indoor humidity at around 60 percent by using humidifiers.

7. Eyesore Removal

[Anchor Lead]

Mount Songni is known for its stunning scenery, but the beautiful landscape has been marred by communications towers. But now the eyesores are set to be removed by the end of the year.

[Pkg]

Winter has come to Mount Songni, but spots of green can still be detected along its ridges and on the slopes. The rocky cliffs are adorned by the evergreens. The early morning calm is shattered by a white-backed woodpecker, busy searching for food to fatten up for the coming winter. This is mistletoe, a hemi-parasitic plant that both photosynthesizes and lives off of a tree Some endangered animals are spotted as well, indicating that the mountain's ecosystem is well-preserved. On top of Munjangdae, 1,000 meters above sea level, workers are busy taking down a communications tower. An unobstructed view opened up when the workers removed the 40-meter tall steel tower that has been an eyesore for the past 44 years. Nine of the ten towers due for removal have already been demolished. The tower wreckage will be moved to the lower ground by a helicopter sometime next spring.

[Soundbite] Lee Jeong-yeong(National Park Service) : "In order to restore nature to its original state after removing the tower, we’ll harmonize the ecosystem with Munjangdae and other surrounding areas."

Now the challenge is to revive the ecosystem that had previously been damaged by the towers and artificial structures.

8. Fragrant Watercress

[Anchor Lead]

Fragrant watercress is used in lots of Korean dishes. And winter is the peak season for this aromatic ingredient.

[Pkg]

Despite the bone-chilling early winter wind, the harvest for watercress is in full swing. Workers are busy picking and washing the watercress, also known as water parsley, from the icy water. The harvested watercress is moved to a greenhouse to be cleaned and packaged before it is sent out to the market. Grown with clean water, watercress from Jeonju has tender stems and a vivid color, making it a colorful delicacy for winter meals.

[Soundbite] Kim Sun-ja(Watercress Farmer) : "Watercress from Jeonju is famous for not having any leeches, its good color, and for being clean and organic. The water is also unpolluted."

In the Jeonju area, some forty farmers grow the watercress on two million square meters of land. One of the eight delicacies of Jeonju, the watercress is popular all over the country. This winter alone, experts forecast that more than 2.76 million dollars' worth of watercress will be sold. The tasty and fragrant watercress from Jeonju is bringing more income and vitality to the local farmers.

9. Coffee Spots

[Anchor Lead]

. Over the course of a few years, Korea has gone from being a place where instant coffee was pretty much the only kind you could find, to a place where cafes are on every corner. Today we're going to take a look at some smaller coffee shops that have carved out their own niches in this saturated market.

[Pkg]

This little cafe near an elementary school is filled to the brim with unusual items.

[Soundbite] "There’s so much to see here. It's fun."

The coffee here is hand dripped. By the time the first cup is ready, the cafe is already packed with customers. The secret of the coffee is the charcoal roasting.

[Soundbite] Lee Hyeong-chun(Cafe Owner) : "The red sparks that look like far infrared rays generate heat. They help cook the coffee through for a deeper taste."

The most popular items on the menu are the kiln-baked hotteok, a type of sweet pancake.

[Soundbite] "They have a fun shape, they're not greasy and they’re very chewy."

The endless personal touches here have made this cafe a big hit in the neighborhood.

[Soundbite] "Even though it's small, I hope that while they’re having coffee, customers will be able to reminisce and bond with each other."

This cafe is a bit bigger, but is no ordinary coffee shop.

[Soundbite] "The owner is a dentist. I received treatment here."

The barista is also a dentist.

[Soundbite] "Even though I’m a dentist, I’m also a certified barista because I love coffee."

He spends his day shifting between his two roles.

[Soundbite] Dr. Kim Dong-seok(Dentist) : "It’s painful to wait in dental clinics. You can hear people crying inside and you're just scared it might hurt. So I’d like to let my customers wait in a more relaxed atmosphere."

After their consultation, visitors head to the nearby examination room. Everyone who comes to this dentist gets treated to a free cup of coffee, whether they get dental treatment or not.

[Soundbite] "A cup of coffee usually costs as much as a lunch. We come here to have some coffee after eating somewhere else. Then we go home."

This next place has a specific clientele.

[Soundbite] "No, no. Men aren’t allowed in here."

This cafe serves all kinds of herbal teas that are said to be good for women. It also specializes in herbal treatments that are especially for women.

[Soundbite] "I don't drink caffeine because it makes my hands shake, but here I can have herbal tea. I like it."

The customers sip tea as the herbs do their work. The owners claim that this helps ladies relieve stress and stay healthy.

[Soundbite] "This place is just for women. I like it because I can chat with others and enjoy warm tea and improve my health."

In a country where the coffee shop competition is beyond fierce, these cafes have found their competitive edge.
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