기사 본문 영역

상세페이지

Cold Warnings
입력 2012.12.26 (16:09) 수정 2012.12.26 (16:51) News Today
자동재생
동영상영역 시작
동영상영역 끝
[Anchor Lead]

The freezing temperatures continue in Korea, with cold weather advisories being issued in the interior. With the wind chill, morning lows dropped to around minus 20 degrees Celsius in inland areas today.

[Pkg]

Strong, cold winds sharply brought down temperatures overnight. Cold wave warnings were issued for northern Gyeonggi and northern Gangwon provinces while cold wave alerts are in effect in the central inland areas as well as the inlands of North Gyeongsang and North Jeolla provinces. The morning low in the Daegwallyeong mountain pass plunged to minus 20 degrees on December 26th, 10 degrees lower than the previous day. The mercury in inland areas including Seoul also fell to minus 15. Due to strong winds, the wind chill temperature in the central regions is nearly minus 20 degrees. Even in the afternoon, temperatures will remain negative in the central and southern inland areas with minus six degrees expected in Seoul. Snow from the 25th has frozen up roads due to the bitter cold, thus precautions will be needed when driving and walking. The cold snap is forecasted to let up from noon on the 27th and normal temperatures will resume on the 28th. The Korea Meteorological Administration predicts rain or snow nationwide for the 28th after which the continental high pressure front will again expand bringing freezing weather early next week.

2. Park in Transition

[Anchor Lead]

President-elect Park Geun-hye delivered meals to needy elderly people living alone on Christmas Day. She also made some surprise picks for her administration, stressing that she will value expertise first and foremost when selecting officials.

[Pkg]

The stairway is so narrow and small that it is hard for even a single person to climb it. President-elect Park Geun-hye visited each of the senior citizens who live alone in this neighborhood to deliver meals and give words of consolation.

[Soundbite] Park Geun-hye (President-Elect): “Please take good care of yourself and stay healthy. We’ll work hard to make it easier for you in the new year.”

[Soundbite] Senior Citizen: “I really, really appreciate that. These aren’t empty words.”

After wrapping up her schedule for social services, Park said that she regards expertise as the most important factor when she selects the head of the transition team and other presidential and government officials.

[Soundbite] “Expertise is the most important thing. I'm also taking into consideration other factors, comprehensively.”

The president-elect stressed that selecting unqualified officials must be avoided as it would ultimately be a burden on the people and future governments, noting some recent parachute appointments at state-run corporations. Park's transition team will use the Korea Banking Institute’s building in Samcheong-dong, Seoul, as its office. The office of the president-elect will be at the Financial Supervisory Service’s training center in Tongeui-dong, Seoul. The president-elect's senior spokesman Yoon Chang-jung, a former journalist, issued an apology to those who might have been hurt by his past remarks and writings. However, the main opposition Democratic United Party has repeatedly called on the president-elect to replace Yoon with another more qualified for the position.

3. Jeonse Prices

[Anchor Lead]

In Korea, many renters pay a significant lump-sum deposit on their homes known as jeonse. The ratio of jeonse to the price of the apartment has reached an average of 63 percent, its highest level since 2001. This means it makes more sense for people looking for a place to just buy their own, but the slumping housing market is showing no signs of perking up.

[Pkg]

This man paid more than US$186,000 for the jeonse deposit for his rented apartment. He had to take out a loan from a bank to cover the costs. His jeonse contract will expire in four months, but the owner is demanding that he pay US$37,000 more if he wants to renew the contract. The average jeonse deposits of houses have risen 39 percent around the nation over the past three years while their selling prices have remained unchanged. On the market, there are many apartments that would-be home owners can purchase if they pay up to US$46,000 more along with the jeonse deposits. The average jeonse deposits for apartments are 63 percent of their selling prices. The gap between the selling and jeonse prices has significantly narrowed, but the housing market remains in a frozen state with potential home owners reluctant to buy houses. The sale of homes did momentarily jump thanks to a temporary reduction in acquisition taxes, but the increase is not as good as last year's. Only the demand for jeonse is surging.

[Soundbite] Kim Gyu-jeong (Researcher, Woori Investment & Securities): “Rumors that housing prices could continue falling are spreading amid the global economic depression.”

Real estate experts advise potential home owners to take plenty of time before buying homes if interested. They add that it is better for would-be home owners to buy houses put up for urgent sale without taking out more loans.

4. Airline Inconveniences


[Anchor Lead]

Low budget airlines are popular these days because they let many people take vacations they wouldn’t otherwise be able to afford. But delays and cancellations are frequent and the number of passenger complaints is soaring.

[Pkg]

On December 23, one domestic low budget airline flight was delayed for over three hours. A connecting flight from Bangkok did not arrive in time, and the passengers grew extremely anxious. Two weeks ago, a foreign low budget airline company reported a sudden engine breakdown which led to a seven hour delay for the flight. Passengers called up the airline's domestic branch office, but couldn't contact anyone in charge. The number of flight delays and cancellations from low budget airlines that occurred at airports across the country from January to November this year rose more than 30 percent compared to the number recorded three years ago. Since low budget firms operate a small fleet of planes back to back, if a problem should arise for any reason, the company’s whole system is affected.

[Soundbite] Kim Dae-gi (Busan Regional Aviation Administration): “Low budget airlines typically own fewer than ten planes and are ill-equipped to address malfunction issues.”

Another problem is there are no regulations concerning compensation except for passenger notification and refunds. Despite their attractive low airfares, low budget airlines are being called on to expand their fleet and to address their flight delay and cancellation problems.

5. Suspect Recaptured

[Anchor Lead]

Police have finally recaptured a rape suspect who escaped from custody and had been on the run for five days.

[Pkg]

Rape suspect No Yeong-dae was taken back to the police station he ran away from. No ran off five days ago on December 20 handcuffed and barefooted. He returned with his hair shaved off and wearing a black T shirt.

[Soundbite] No Yeong-dae (Suspect): “(How did you undo the handcuffs?) I'm sorry.”

No was recaptured at around 4:20 p.m., December 25. Surrounded by police, the suspect walks out of an office studio in Ansan, Gyeonggi Province. A friend from jail had provided a hiding place. No had the handcuffs on his left wrist.

[Soundbite] Supt. Baek Seung-eon (Gyeonggi Ilsan Police Station): “His left wrist was still handcuffed and the right one was uncuffed, so one side would be dangling, right? He cuffed that to his left wrist.”

He was arrested on December 17 with charges of breaking into an apartment in Ilsan, Gyeonggi Province and raping a woman. On December 20, he took off while being investigated by police. Afterwards, No was spotted in Ansan and Incheon and disappeared after receiving some money from a friend. Police are questioning No on any additional crimes and of his whereabouts during his escape.

6. Alchol Rehab

[Anchor Lead]

Koreans are well known for their love of alcohol, but alcoholism is a serious social issue in the country. Now, rehabilitation communities are starting to emerge here as a way for alcoholics to battle their demons with others who know what they’re going through.

[Pkg]

Alcoholics confess their painful and regretful past memories to one another.

[Soundbite] “Alcoholic Patient: I began drinking because of some issues. I got addicted to alcohol and was drunk all the time. I couldn’t live a normal life and became homeless.”

These men are alcoholics who live together at this facility, paying some 214 U.S. dollars a month to get treated. They receive psychological counseling at the facility. However, while they live here, they also have to do chores, such as cooking, cleaning, and washing the dishes. The reason behind this is to help them regain the social skills that they had lost from being an alcoholic. Some 290 alcoholics entered the facility. About 90 people completed its six-month program. Half of them succeeded in kicking the habit of drinking.

[Soundbite] Jo Hyeon-seop (Chairman, Korean Association For Addiction Professionals): “Addicts can change their thinking, behaviors and habits. In foreign countries, there’re reports that over 50 percent, or up to 70 percent of rehab community members, recover from alcoholism.”

There are many rehab centers like this one found in Western countries, but there are only two in Korea. Experts are calling on the government to support the establishment and promote the use of such rehab facilities.

7. Regular Exercise

[Anchor Lead]

It’s common knowledge that regular exercise is important for your health. Today we have for you the global standards on how regularly you need to work out to see the effects.

[Pkg]

This 57-year-old woman took part in the so-called “Physical Strength 100" service” through where her basic physical conditions were measured. The service is available near her home. She had her basic physical strength indicators measured for free and was also prescribed with an exercise routine. It's the first time she received these tests and she's again committed to exercising regularly. Though the physical strength test service has been introduced, exactly how regularly you must exercise has been ambiguous. In its recent survey, the Culture, Sports and Tourism Ministry applied guidelines recommended by the World Health Organization. The guidelines advise that adults exercise at least 150 minutes a week and children and teenagers at least 60 minutes a day. According to the ministry’s survey, seven out of ten Korean female teens do not exercise at all. Even those in their 40 to 50s, who participated in the most out of all age groups, it was found that only half of them exercised. The survey results show the opposite of how things should be. Younger people who need to bolster their strength don't exercise while older folks start up when their stamina levels begin to drop. Regular exercise is necessary to reap practical results in a rapidly aging society.

[Soundbite] Kim Yong-hwan (Culture, Sports & Tourism Vice Minister): “Physical training for the public is social capital and social investment for the centenarian era.”

For adults, just an average of 30 minutes a day is recommended. Regular exercise is the wisest investment you can make to live over the age of a hundred.

8. Homeless Band

[Anchor Lead]

A group of homeless people have formed a band and taken to the streets to perform. Through music, they’re working to overcome their tough situations and also providing hope to others.

[Pkg]

This band performs for an audience at a welfare center. The performance is far from perfect. It's a little awkward, and at times, they miss a beat. But the passion expressed on their faces is nothing less than what one would see from a professional band. Everyone performing was homeless, wandering the streets up until a few months ago.

[Soundbite] Park Yong-gyu (Member, Dream Plus): “Aren't all our hearts scarred? We try to relieve our depression and become positive through music.”

They had asked the provincial government to support them for their musical endeavor back in May, enabling them to create their band, the Dream Plus. Since they turned to music, they've become motivated to return to society. These days, they work during the day and then play music at night.

[Soundbite] Im Gil-bae (Member, Dream Plus): “I was performing and a person behind me clapped. People watching us also sang. Our hearts have opened up.”

The homeless band will continue to spread their message of hope and determination for those in despair through its charity performances.

9. Cheap Eats

[Anchor Lead]

Times are tough these days, and fewer people are eating out with their families. So today we’re going to take you to some restaurants that let you treat yourself without breaking the bank.

[Pkg]

Our first stop is a noodle joint in a traditional market in Incheon. This place packs them in with its rock-bottom prices.

[Soundbite] “The soup is really great!”

After warming up over a bowl of noodles called kalguksu, the bill only comes to two thousand won, or under two U.S. dollars.

[Soundbite] “Kalguksu, a bowl of kalguksu, is is only 2,000 won (US$1.86).”

The unbelievably low price makes people suspicious of what is going into the food.

[Soundbite] Jeong Yong-gap (Owner, Noodle Restaurant): “Taste is the most important thing for food. An owner is wrong if he thinks that he can make tasty food with bad ingredients. You can attract customers when you make delicious food with good ingredients.”

The owner, Jeong Yong-gap, keeps prices low with good, old-fashioned elbow grease by making the noodles himself every day. The restaurant draws a daily average of over 800 customers.

[Soundbite] “I don't try to make a big profit. I just try to offer good food to draw customers. I can earn enough money with a low-price, high-volume policy.”

A restaurant in Jongno, Seoul, also offers quality cuisine at low prices.

[Soundbite] “Ma'am, dakgaejang, please!”

[Soundbite] “I come here almost every working day. The foods are good and it’s cheap. You can see it. These prices can’t be found at other restaurants in the world.”

Everything on the menu is under three dollars here. The owner buys her ingredients in bulk so she can keep her business afloat without raising prices. Chicken soup called dakgaejang is the most popular dish here because of the generous portions and the fact that only domestic chickens are used.

[Soundbite] “You’d have to pay at least 5,000 or 6,000 won in other restaurants. I frequently come here because the dishes are good and cheap.”

Korean beef called hanu is highly coveted but the price keeps it isolated to special occasions. But here, they serve high-quality hanu without the high price tag.

[Soundbite] Kim Jeong-su (Owner, Beef Restaurant): “I worked as a broker in the distribution of livestock products for 20 years. So I can see changes in meat prices earlier than anyone else. Since I buy and process the meat myself, I can sell it at low prices.”

The owner, Kim Jung-su, keeps the prices down without skimping on the thickness of the steaks by cutting out the middleman and doing his own butchering.

[Soundbite] “They sell tenderloin and sirloin. I’m having that today.”

As long as he’s not running in the red and his customers are happy, Kim believes his business is doing its job. And this keeps people coming back.

[Soundbite] “It's really great to eat hanu at the price of pork.”

Even while the winter freeze extends to the economy, these restaurants are keeping their tables full and their customers satisfied.
  • Cold Warnings
    • 입력 2012-12-26 16:35:46
    • 수정2012-12-26 16:51:32
    News Today
[Anchor Lead]

The freezing temperatures continue in Korea, with cold weather advisories being issued in the interior. With the wind chill, morning lows dropped to around minus 20 degrees Celsius in inland areas today.

[Pkg]

Strong, cold winds sharply brought down temperatures overnight. Cold wave warnings were issued for northern Gyeonggi and northern Gangwon provinces while cold wave alerts are in effect in the central inland areas as well as the inlands of North Gyeongsang and North Jeolla provinces. The morning low in the Daegwallyeong mountain pass plunged to minus 20 degrees on December 26th, 10 degrees lower than the previous day. The mercury in inland areas including Seoul also fell to minus 15. Due to strong winds, the wind chill temperature in the central regions is nearly minus 20 degrees. Even in the afternoon, temperatures will remain negative in the central and southern inland areas with minus six degrees expected in Seoul. Snow from the 25th has frozen up roads due to the bitter cold, thus precautions will be needed when driving and walking. The cold snap is forecasted to let up from noon on the 27th and normal temperatures will resume on the 28th. The Korea Meteorological Administration predicts rain or snow nationwide for the 28th after which the continental high pressure front will again expand bringing freezing weather early next week.

2. Park in Transition

[Anchor Lead]

President-elect Park Geun-hye delivered meals to needy elderly people living alone on Christmas Day. She also made some surprise picks for her administration, stressing that she will value expertise first and foremost when selecting officials.

[Pkg]

The stairway is so narrow and small that it is hard for even a single person to climb it. President-elect Park Geun-hye visited each of the senior citizens who live alone in this neighborhood to deliver meals and give words of consolation.

[Soundbite] Park Geun-hye (President-Elect): “Please take good care of yourself and stay healthy. We’ll work hard to make it easier for you in the new year.”

[Soundbite] Senior Citizen: “I really, really appreciate that. These aren’t empty words.”

After wrapping up her schedule for social services, Park said that she regards expertise as the most important factor when she selects the head of the transition team and other presidential and government officials.

[Soundbite] “Expertise is the most important thing. I'm also taking into consideration other factors, comprehensively.”

The president-elect stressed that selecting unqualified officials must be avoided as it would ultimately be a burden on the people and future governments, noting some recent parachute appointments at state-run corporations. Park's transition team will use the Korea Banking Institute’s building in Samcheong-dong, Seoul, as its office. The office of the president-elect will be at the Financial Supervisory Service’s training center in Tongeui-dong, Seoul. The president-elect's senior spokesman Yoon Chang-jung, a former journalist, issued an apology to those who might have been hurt by his past remarks and writings. However, the main opposition Democratic United Party has repeatedly called on the president-elect to replace Yoon with another more qualified for the position.

3. Jeonse Prices

[Anchor Lead]

In Korea, many renters pay a significant lump-sum deposit on their homes known as jeonse. The ratio of jeonse to the price of the apartment has reached an average of 63 percent, its highest level since 2001. This means it makes more sense for people looking for a place to just buy their own, but the slumping housing market is showing no signs of perking up.

[Pkg]

This man paid more than US$186,000 for the jeonse deposit for his rented apartment. He had to take out a loan from a bank to cover the costs. His jeonse contract will expire in four months, but the owner is demanding that he pay US$37,000 more if he wants to renew the contract. The average jeonse deposits of houses have risen 39 percent around the nation over the past three years while their selling prices have remained unchanged. On the market, there are many apartments that would-be home owners can purchase if they pay up to US$46,000 more along with the jeonse deposits. The average jeonse deposits for apartments are 63 percent of their selling prices. The gap between the selling and jeonse prices has significantly narrowed, but the housing market remains in a frozen state with potential home owners reluctant to buy houses. The sale of homes did momentarily jump thanks to a temporary reduction in acquisition taxes, but the increase is not as good as last year's. Only the demand for jeonse is surging.

[Soundbite] Kim Gyu-jeong (Researcher, Woori Investment & Securities): “Rumors that housing prices could continue falling are spreading amid the global economic depression.”

Real estate experts advise potential home owners to take plenty of time before buying homes if interested. They add that it is better for would-be home owners to buy houses put up for urgent sale without taking out more loans.

4. Airline Inconveniences


[Anchor Lead]

Low budget airlines are popular these days because they let many people take vacations they wouldn’t otherwise be able to afford. But delays and cancellations are frequent and the number of passenger complaints is soaring.

[Pkg]

On December 23, one domestic low budget airline flight was delayed for over three hours. A connecting flight from Bangkok did not arrive in time, and the passengers grew extremely anxious. Two weeks ago, a foreign low budget airline company reported a sudden engine breakdown which led to a seven hour delay for the flight. Passengers called up the airline's domestic branch office, but couldn't contact anyone in charge. The number of flight delays and cancellations from low budget airlines that occurred at airports across the country from January to November this year rose more than 30 percent compared to the number recorded three years ago. Since low budget firms operate a small fleet of planes back to back, if a problem should arise for any reason, the company’s whole system is affected.

[Soundbite] Kim Dae-gi (Busan Regional Aviation Administration): “Low budget airlines typically own fewer than ten planes and are ill-equipped to address malfunction issues.”

Another problem is there are no regulations concerning compensation except for passenger notification and refunds. Despite their attractive low airfares, low budget airlines are being called on to expand their fleet and to address their flight delay and cancellation problems.

5. Suspect Recaptured

[Anchor Lead]

Police have finally recaptured a rape suspect who escaped from custody and had been on the run for five days.

[Pkg]

Rape suspect No Yeong-dae was taken back to the police station he ran away from. No ran off five days ago on December 20 handcuffed and barefooted. He returned with his hair shaved off and wearing a black T shirt.

[Soundbite] No Yeong-dae (Suspect): “(How did you undo the handcuffs?) I'm sorry.”

No was recaptured at around 4:20 p.m., December 25. Surrounded by police, the suspect walks out of an office studio in Ansan, Gyeonggi Province. A friend from jail had provided a hiding place. No had the handcuffs on his left wrist.

[Soundbite] Supt. Baek Seung-eon (Gyeonggi Ilsan Police Station): “His left wrist was still handcuffed and the right one was uncuffed, so one side would be dangling, right? He cuffed that to his left wrist.”

He was arrested on December 17 with charges of breaking into an apartment in Ilsan, Gyeonggi Province and raping a woman. On December 20, he took off while being investigated by police. Afterwards, No was spotted in Ansan and Incheon and disappeared after receiving some money from a friend. Police are questioning No on any additional crimes and of his whereabouts during his escape.

6. Alchol Rehab

[Anchor Lead]

Koreans are well known for their love of alcohol, but alcoholism is a serious social issue in the country. Now, rehabilitation communities are starting to emerge here as a way for alcoholics to battle their demons with others who know what they’re going through.

[Pkg]

Alcoholics confess their painful and regretful past memories to one another.

[Soundbite] “Alcoholic Patient: I began drinking because of some issues. I got addicted to alcohol and was drunk all the time. I couldn’t live a normal life and became homeless.”

These men are alcoholics who live together at this facility, paying some 214 U.S. dollars a month to get treated. They receive psychological counseling at the facility. However, while they live here, they also have to do chores, such as cooking, cleaning, and washing the dishes. The reason behind this is to help them regain the social skills that they had lost from being an alcoholic. Some 290 alcoholics entered the facility. About 90 people completed its six-month program. Half of them succeeded in kicking the habit of drinking.

[Soundbite] Jo Hyeon-seop (Chairman, Korean Association For Addiction Professionals): “Addicts can change their thinking, behaviors and habits. In foreign countries, there’re reports that over 50 percent, or up to 70 percent of rehab community members, recover from alcoholism.”

There are many rehab centers like this one found in Western countries, but there are only two in Korea. Experts are calling on the government to support the establishment and promote the use of such rehab facilities.

7. Regular Exercise

[Anchor Lead]

It’s common knowledge that regular exercise is important for your health. Today we have for you the global standards on how regularly you need to work out to see the effects.

[Pkg]

This 57-year-old woman took part in the so-called “Physical Strength 100" service” through where her basic physical conditions were measured. The service is available near her home. She had her basic physical strength indicators measured for free and was also prescribed with an exercise routine. It's the first time she received these tests and she's again committed to exercising regularly. Though the physical strength test service has been introduced, exactly how regularly you must exercise has been ambiguous. In its recent survey, the Culture, Sports and Tourism Ministry applied guidelines recommended by the World Health Organization. The guidelines advise that adults exercise at least 150 minutes a week and children and teenagers at least 60 minutes a day. According to the ministry’s survey, seven out of ten Korean female teens do not exercise at all. Even those in their 40 to 50s, who participated in the most out of all age groups, it was found that only half of them exercised. The survey results show the opposite of how things should be. Younger people who need to bolster their strength don't exercise while older folks start up when their stamina levels begin to drop. Regular exercise is necessary to reap practical results in a rapidly aging society.

[Soundbite] Kim Yong-hwan (Culture, Sports & Tourism Vice Minister): “Physical training for the public is social capital and social investment for the centenarian era.”

For adults, just an average of 30 minutes a day is recommended. Regular exercise is the wisest investment you can make to live over the age of a hundred.

8. Homeless Band

[Anchor Lead]

A group of homeless people have formed a band and taken to the streets to perform. Through music, they’re working to overcome their tough situations and also providing hope to others.

[Pkg]

This band performs for an audience at a welfare center. The performance is far from perfect. It's a little awkward, and at times, they miss a beat. But the passion expressed on their faces is nothing less than what one would see from a professional band. Everyone performing was homeless, wandering the streets up until a few months ago.

[Soundbite] Park Yong-gyu (Member, Dream Plus): “Aren't all our hearts scarred? We try to relieve our depression and become positive through music.”

They had asked the provincial government to support them for their musical endeavor back in May, enabling them to create their band, the Dream Plus. Since they turned to music, they've become motivated to return to society. These days, they work during the day and then play music at night.

[Soundbite] Im Gil-bae (Member, Dream Plus): “I was performing and a person behind me clapped. People watching us also sang. Our hearts have opened up.”

The homeless band will continue to spread their message of hope and determination for those in despair through its charity performances.

9. Cheap Eats

[Anchor Lead]

Times are tough these days, and fewer people are eating out with their families. So today we’re going to take you to some restaurants that let you treat yourself without breaking the bank.

[Pkg]

Our first stop is a noodle joint in a traditional market in Incheon. This place packs them in with its rock-bottom prices.

[Soundbite] “The soup is really great!”

After warming up over a bowl of noodles called kalguksu, the bill only comes to two thousand won, or under two U.S. dollars.

[Soundbite] “Kalguksu, a bowl of kalguksu, is is only 2,000 won (US$1.86).”

The unbelievably low price makes people suspicious of what is going into the food.

[Soundbite] Jeong Yong-gap (Owner, Noodle Restaurant): “Taste is the most important thing for food. An owner is wrong if he thinks that he can make tasty food with bad ingredients. You can attract customers when you make delicious food with good ingredients.”

The owner, Jeong Yong-gap, keeps prices low with good, old-fashioned elbow grease by making the noodles himself every day. The restaurant draws a daily average of over 800 customers.

[Soundbite] “I don't try to make a big profit. I just try to offer good food to draw customers. I can earn enough money with a low-price, high-volume policy.”

A restaurant in Jongno, Seoul, also offers quality cuisine at low prices.

[Soundbite] “Ma'am, dakgaejang, please!”

[Soundbite] “I come here almost every working day. The foods are good and it’s cheap. You can see it. These prices can’t be found at other restaurants in the world.”

Everything on the menu is under three dollars here. The owner buys her ingredients in bulk so she can keep her business afloat without raising prices. Chicken soup called dakgaejang is the most popular dish here because of the generous portions and the fact that only domestic chickens are used.

[Soundbite] “You’d have to pay at least 5,000 or 6,000 won in other restaurants. I frequently come here because the dishes are good and cheap.”

Korean beef called hanu is highly coveted but the price keeps it isolated to special occasions. But here, they serve high-quality hanu without the high price tag.

[Soundbite] Kim Jeong-su (Owner, Beef Restaurant): “I worked as a broker in the distribution of livestock products for 20 years. So I can see changes in meat prices earlier than anyone else. Since I buy and process the meat myself, I can sell it at low prices.”

The owner, Kim Jung-su, keeps the prices down without skimping on the thickness of the steaks by cutting out the middleman and doing his own butchering.

[Soundbite] “They sell tenderloin and sirloin. I’m having that today.”

As long as he’s not running in the red and his customers are happy, Kim believes his business is doing its job. And this keeps people coming back.

[Soundbite] “It's really great to eat hanu at the price of pork.”

Even while the winter freeze extends to the economy, these restaurants are keeping their tables full and their customers satisfied.
kbs가 손수 골랐습니다. 네이버에서도 보세요.