기사 본문 영역

상세페이지

On Alert
입력 2013.04.05 (15:38) 수정 2013.04.05 (16:14) News Today
자동재생
동영상영역 시작
동영상영역 끝
[Anchor Lead]

North Korea has again threatened a nuclear attack on the United States. South Korean and U.S. military authorities are keeping a close eye on Pyongyang.

[Pkg]

The North Korean military general staff department spokesman again declared a nuclear attack against the U.S. in a statement. In response to Washington's recent deployment of strategic military assets including F-22 stealth fighters to the Koran peninsula, Pyongyang threatened to attack the U.S. mainland with its now smaller and lighter nuclear warhead.

[Soundbite] Korean Central TV (Apr. 4) : "We're notifying the White House and Pentagon that our revolutionary force has undergone final inspections and preparations for a merciless operation."

Seoul and Washington's military authorities assume that North Korea could possibly test-fire a ballistic missile loaded with a warhead weighing under a ton this month. Authorities are keeping close watch after hearing that the North is currently transferring its Musudan missile with a range of approximately 3,000 kilometers to its east coast missile base.

[Soundbite] Col. Wi Yong-seop (Vice Spokesman, Min. of Nat’l Defense) : "We're keeping a 24-hour watch over the North’s entire territory. We're focusing on any signs of missile firings including the Rodongand Musudan missiles."

In the frontline, South Korean military authorities are on alert and commanders of all units are also in a state of readiness to be able to convene within an hour.

2. Reactor Resumed


[Anchor Lead]

North Korea announced two days ago that it will restart its Yongbyon nuclear reactor, and satellite photos show signs of new construction. It's possible steps to put the reactor back online began a while ago.

[Pkg]

[Soundbite] Korean Central TV (Apr. 2) : "Measures include revamping and restarting the incapacitated five-megawatt graphite reactor."

North Korea declared on Tuesday that it will restart its nuclear reactor in Yongbyon after a five year hiatus. And this is a satellite photo of the Yongbyon site taken by a commercial U.S. satellite on March 27. Compared to images shot in February, a road just next to the reactor is dug open and surrounding structures have also increased. An exclusive Internet portal on North Korea, 38 North, says the signs detected may point to preparations to restart the reactor. Following a six-party agreement, North Korea in the past cut off a pipe connecting the reactor to the cooling tower. Analysts say traces of construction shown on the photo may be the site after North Korea restored its severed pipe, trying to connect it with the cooling water pump device.

[Soundbite] Prof. Seo Gyun-ryeol (Seoul National University) : "Previously the North relied on the air cooling method with their tower, but now they might use the water cooling method instead. This way, it’s very possible for construction to take place using underground tunnels and go undetected."

It's unclear how the North will manage to apply a new way to operate the outdated reactor. Forecasts are mixed as to how long it will take for the nuclear facilities to be up and running. Some say weeks and others years. The South Korean government is believed to have mobilized joint intelligence assets with the U.S., including spy satellites to monitor any other unusual moves spotted at nuclear sites in Yongbyon as well as the North’s other sites at Taechon and Pakchon.

3. NK Hacked

[Anchor Lead]

The international hacker group Anonymous has attacked a North Korean propaganda Web site. The hackers also obtained the personal information of some 9,000 members of the site.

[Pkg]

The North Korean Web site "uriminzokkiri," which is run by the North's Committee for the Peaceful Reunification of the Fatherland, was hacked on Thursday. The Web site can't be accessed from North Korea or anywhere else in the world. The hackers turned out to be the members of an international hacking organization called Anonymous. They even obtained and disclosed the personal information of some 9,000 members of the North Korean site. Messages about the cyber attack appeared earlier on Uriminzokkiri's Twitter page, while its image was changed to a picture that read, "Tango down." In their message, the hackers wrote that North Korea poses a continuous threat to peace and freedom, and demanded that Pyongyang stop its nuclear threats, have its leader, Kim Jong-un, resign, implement democracy immediately and guarantee uncensored Internet access to its citizens.

[Soundbite] Park Chi-min (CEO, Security Company) : "It looks like an attempt by private hackers to solve national problems that the government isn’t due to diplomatic conflicts or technical reasons."

Anonymous calls itself "the digital Robin Hood" and "the anarchistic cyber guerilla." In November last year, Anonymous hacked more than 700 Israeli Web sites to express its protest against Israel's attacks on the Gaza Strip, and paralyzed the Web sites of the U.S. Department of Defense and the Syrian government.

4. Kaesong Closed

[Anchor Lead]

Companies at the inter-Korean industrial park in the North Korean city of Kaesong are facing difficulties as access to the park has been blocked. They're running out of food, fuel, raw materials and other supplies. The situation is expected to be even more difficult over the weekend.

[Pkg]

Freight trucks transporting materials to the North Korean city of Kaesong stand in a long line early in the morning. But they eventually had to turn around and go back.

[Soundbite] "We apologize for the inconvenience."

Operations at some of the firms located at the Kaesong Industrial Complex have been halted because their supply of raw materials was cut off. Two apparel companies have already stopped their production processes, while another firm is only partially operating.

[Soundbite] Han Jae-gwon (Chairman, Kaesong Industrial Business Association) : "The gas supply was cut off yesterday so some firms had to stop some of their production lines."

To make things worse, a three-day holiday period starts in North Korea today. Firms at the Kaesong Industrial Complex are running out of food supplies and fuel. They could run out of their reserves completely this coming weekend because they only have a week's worth of supplies. If the firms run out of fuel, the operation of some 250 commute buses transporting North Korean workers will also be halted. The South Korean government and the representatives of the firms located in Kaesong are demanding the normalization of the industrial park's operations as soon as possible. But North Korea only keeps saying that it could withdraw its workers from the industrial complex altogether. On Thursday morning, North Korea's request for information on the number of workers at the Kaesong Industrial Complex led to some confusion as South Korean authorities misunderstood it as Pyongyang's intention to withdraw its workers.

5. Brain Wave Tech


[Anchor Lead]

If you ever thought of making an animal do something with your mind, that might just be possible. Korean scientists have invented a brain wave transferring device that’s a lot like telepathy.

[Pkg]

A woman whose arms and legs are paralyzed moves a robot's arm around using brain signals. She can also drink using its arm. Electrodes planted in her head send brain signals to the robot. For something like this to normally happen, a brain surgery is required. But a team at Harvard University led by Professor Yoo Seung-schik developed a new technology of transmitting brain waves without having to go under the knife. A person with sensors attached to the head views a computer screen. When the object on the screen blinks, brain wave vibrations expand. This is conveyed to the mouse and it starts to move its tail.

[Soundbite] Prof. Yoo Seung-schik (Harvard University) : "Without planting electrodes in the brain through surgery but instead using supersonic waves, we can stimulate the deepest parts of the brain."

This is the first time human brain signals have made a living animal move. What’s left now is applying this to humans instead of mice.

[Soundbite] Prof. Jeong Yong-an (Catholic Univ. of Korea Incheon St. Mary's Hospital) : "It’s opened a way for treating patients with depression or mental illnesses by transferring person’s senses and normal brain waves to a depressed person."

If the technology can be further advanced, we can expect an era where a person can transmit his thoughts via brain waves to another person.

6. Reforestation Efforts


[Anchor Lead]

Today is Arbor Day. Steady reforestation efforts have allowed the nation to recover from much of the devastation of the nation’s mountain forests from the Korean War 60 years ago. Let’s take a look at some scenes released by the National Archives of Arbor Day events of the 1960s and '70s.

[Pkg]

The Korean War left the country in ashes and with bald, barren mountains. In an effort to prevent natural calamities, such as floodings and landslides, soldiers and even women were called in to plant trees.

[Soundbite] Daehan News (1961) : "Those mobilized here are mainly forestry officers from each province. Restoration is proceeding according to schedule."

The stumbling block in fostering lush greenery was insects. Pesticides were sprayed when insects such as the fall webworm plagued the mountains. Vermin extermination was held as an annual public campaign. In the spring, the prevention of mountain fires was the top task. It takes dozens of years to restore hills and rivers devastated by war.

[Soundbite] Daehan News (1984) : "It's extremely difficult to put out raging forest fires. Being aware of sparks is taking care of the mountain."

Fire prevention campaigns targeting mountain climbers were the same back then as they are now. Images of Korea's past forestation efforts can be viewed at the National Archives of Korea's Web site.

7. By-Election Run-Up

[Anchor Lead]

On Thursday, candidate registration began for the upcoming by-elections. The ruling and opposition parties are stepping up their campaigns.

[Pkg]

The Saenuri Party held an executive meeting in Nowon-C District, where competition is expected to be the most severe. The party promised to resolve the district's issues. Candidate Huh Joon-young stressed that only someone who knows the needs of the local residents can help them improve their standards of living.

[Soundbite] Huh Joon-young (Nowon-C District Saenuri Candidate) : "Words aren't enough. You need to have been a worker yourself and also know others that have done the same."

Candidate Ahn Cheol-soo, pledged for "new politics." Earlier, the main opposition Democratic United Party decided to forego the by-elections in order to help him. Ahn says that the upcoming by-elections will change the political dynamics in Korea and stood up against the Park Geun-hye administration.

[Soundbite] Ahn Cheol-soo (Nowon-C District Independent Candidate) : "If the Park administration fails to innovate itself, we’ll keep it in check using new politics and set it right."

Unified Progressive Party contender Jeong Tae-heung and Progressive Justice Party Kim Ji-seon also registered for the race. The DUP will hold emergency committee meetings next week in Yeongdo, Busan and South Chungcheong Province including Cheongyang and Buyeo to step up its campaign. Representative Moon Jae-in will likely support the party's candidate in Busan's Yeongdo District. Candidate registration for the by-elections ends today. The official election campaign period starts April 11.

8. Finding Sound

[Anchor Lead]

As any car owner knows, strange noises you hear while driving can be a huge headache. Now, a portable sound camera has been developed that can detect where the noise is coming from.

[Pkg]

The door of a car producing noise is shot by a portable sound camera. Just as in using a heat detection camera, the location of various levels of noise is shown in different colors on the screen. As indicated by the camera, the problem inside the door was found, mended and fixed, causing the noise to disappear. The camera, a global first, is jointly developed by the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology and a private firm. It can pick up abnormal sounds and locate worn out parts and damaged areas.

[Soundbite] Kim Yeong-gi (Joint Developer) : "We developed a high frequency sound camera capable of measuring various sounds using digital technology."

30 micro phones arranged in a spiral shape and a high definition camera serve to show the distribution of noise in colors and locate the origin of the noise. The camera also received a prize at the Red Dot design award, which is one of the three global design competitions, for its ergonomic design.

[Soundbite] Prof. Bae Seok-hyeong (KAIST) : "Since it's an all in one camera there's no need to assemble the microphones. It can also measure a narrow spot or the floor of a car. It's user friendly."

The portable sound camera has been in use by a Korean automaker since February while the firm is developing new car models.

9. Ramyeon Nation

[Anchor Lead]

Ramyeon, one of the most adored comfort foods in Korea, is celebrating its 50th anniversary in the country this year. Food companies, well aware of the love the public has for the dish, are always busy trying to spark a new ramyeon trend and cash in.

[Pkg]

The Korean Internet teems with different ways of cooking ramyeon. Among the many brands, a combination of Chinese-style noodles called jajangmyeon and a spicy type of ramyeon is the latest hit. The blend called "Jjapaguri" became popular after being introduced on a TV show.

[Soundbite] "The Chiense-style jajang ramyeon is a bit greasy. The spicy seasoning adds flavor and makes it taste better."

Ramyeon is so beloved in Korea that there are even buffets where you can whip up your own deluxe dish. Customers are greeted with a feast of instant noodles and different toppings. Pots and burners are also set up and ready to go. This buffet is especially popular among young people. Ramyeon aficionados always have their own particular way of cooking up the simple dish that they claim is the best. One of the most important steps to boiling up the perfect bowl of ramyeon is not overcooking the noodles. A KBS team conducted a test with the help of a ramyeon producer. We compared two bowls that were cooked in different ways. One was prepared in the time-honored fashion. With the other, the noodles were repeatedly exposed to the air while being cooked. But in the end, they both tasted basically the same. Many Koreans believe that the foam formed on the top of ramyeon during cooking should be removed because it’s not supposed to be good for you. But this is just another urban legend surrounding this legendary dish.

[Soundbite] Prof. Im Gyeong-suk (University of Suwon) : "The foam isn’t impurities. They’re produced when protein or carbohydrate is disintegrated. It’s not harmful to the human body. However, it can smells bad sometimes. Removing the foam makes food taste better."

Another aspect of much disagreement is when you should add the powdered seasoning. We also put this to the test. Once again, they both tasted pretty much the same.

[Soundbite] Kim Yeong-jong (Researcher, Ramyeon Manufacturing Firm) : "We measured the condition and taste. There was a small difference. But it could be an experimental error. If you add the seasoning first, it has the effect of raising the boiling point. However, the effect is insignificant."

The widespread appeal of instant noodles has nothing to do with its healthful properties, as it’s far from being a healthy dish. But there are some ways of making it a bit better for you. First up is ramyeon made with basic veggies most people have in their fridge. You make your own sauce for this recipe. Then the vegetables, sauce and noodles are joined into a dish that’s much healthier than your average instant noodles. Next is ramyeon with sprouts. Make an anchovy broth first and cook your noodles in it. Then, simply chuck in as many sprouts as you like. The key to great ramyeon is the additions. If you pick the right extra ingredients, you can make your ramyeon a lot more nutritious.

[Soundbite] Lee Ha-jin (Student, Cooking Class) : "Stirred ramyeon is spicy and served with different vegetables. It’s like a decent dish."

For five decades in Korea, ramyeon has continued to evolve but it is still very close to the hearts of Koreans.
  • On Alert
    • 입력 2013-04-05 15:53:59
    • 수정2013-04-05 16:14:38
    News Today
[Anchor Lead]

North Korea has again threatened a nuclear attack on the United States. South Korean and U.S. military authorities are keeping a close eye on Pyongyang.

[Pkg]

The North Korean military general staff department spokesman again declared a nuclear attack against the U.S. in a statement. In response to Washington's recent deployment of strategic military assets including F-22 stealth fighters to the Koran peninsula, Pyongyang threatened to attack the U.S. mainland with its now smaller and lighter nuclear warhead.

[Soundbite] Korean Central TV (Apr. 4) : "We're notifying the White House and Pentagon that our revolutionary force has undergone final inspections and preparations for a merciless operation."

Seoul and Washington's military authorities assume that North Korea could possibly test-fire a ballistic missile loaded with a warhead weighing under a ton this month. Authorities are keeping close watch after hearing that the North is currently transferring its Musudan missile with a range of approximately 3,000 kilometers to its east coast missile base.

[Soundbite] Col. Wi Yong-seop (Vice Spokesman, Min. of Nat’l Defense) : "We're keeping a 24-hour watch over the North’s entire territory. We're focusing on any signs of missile firings including the Rodongand Musudan missiles."

In the frontline, South Korean military authorities are on alert and commanders of all units are also in a state of readiness to be able to convene within an hour.

2. Reactor Resumed


[Anchor Lead]

North Korea announced two days ago that it will restart its Yongbyon nuclear reactor, and satellite photos show signs of new construction. It's possible steps to put the reactor back online began a while ago.

[Pkg]

[Soundbite] Korean Central TV (Apr. 2) : "Measures include revamping and restarting the incapacitated five-megawatt graphite reactor."

North Korea declared on Tuesday that it will restart its nuclear reactor in Yongbyon after a five year hiatus. And this is a satellite photo of the Yongbyon site taken by a commercial U.S. satellite on March 27. Compared to images shot in February, a road just next to the reactor is dug open and surrounding structures have also increased. An exclusive Internet portal on North Korea, 38 North, says the signs detected may point to preparations to restart the reactor. Following a six-party agreement, North Korea in the past cut off a pipe connecting the reactor to the cooling tower. Analysts say traces of construction shown on the photo may be the site after North Korea restored its severed pipe, trying to connect it with the cooling water pump device.

[Soundbite] Prof. Seo Gyun-ryeol (Seoul National University) : "Previously the North relied on the air cooling method with their tower, but now they might use the water cooling method instead. This way, it’s very possible for construction to take place using underground tunnels and go undetected."

It's unclear how the North will manage to apply a new way to operate the outdated reactor. Forecasts are mixed as to how long it will take for the nuclear facilities to be up and running. Some say weeks and others years. The South Korean government is believed to have mobilized joint intelligence assets with the U.S., including spy satellites to monitor any other unusual moves spotted at nuclear sites in Yongbyon as well as the North’s other sites at Taechon and Pakchon.

3. NK Hacked

[Anchor Lead]

The international hacker group Anonymous has attacked a North Korean propaganda Web site. The hackers also obtained the personal information of some 9,000 members of the site.

[Pkg]

The North Korean Web site "uriminzokkiri," which is run by the North's Committee for the Peaceful Reunification of the Fatherland, was hacked on Thursday. The Web site can't be accessed from North Korea or anywhere else in the world. The hackers turned out to be the members of an international hacking organization called Anonymous. They even obtained and disclosed the personal information of some 9,000 members of the North Korean site. Messages about the cyber attack appeared earlier on Uriminzokkiri's Twitter page, while its image was changed to a picture that read, "Tango down." In their message, the hackers wrote that North Korea poses a continuous threat to peace and freedom, and demanded that Pyongyang stop its nuclear threats, have its leader, Kim Jong-un, resign, implement democracy immediately and guarantee uncensored Internet access to its citizens.

[Soundbite] Park Chi-min (CEO, Security Company) : "It looks like an attempt by private hackers to solve national problems that the government isn’t due to diplomatic conflicts or technical reasons."

Anonymous calls itself "the digital Robin Hood" and "the anarchistic cyber guerilla." In November last year, Anonymous hacked more than 700 Israeli Web sites to express its protest against Israel's attacks on the Gaza Strip, and paralyzed the Web sites of the U.S. Department of Defense and the Syrian government.

4. Kaesong Closed

[Anchor Lead]

Companies at the inter-Korean industrial park in the North Korean city of Kaesong are facing difficulties as access to the park has been blocked. They're running out of food, fuel, raw materials and other supplies. The situation is expected to be even more difficult over the weekend.

[Pkg]

Freight trucks transporting materials to the North Korean city of Kaesong stand in a long line early in the morning. But they eventually had to turn around and go back.

[Soundbite] "We apologize for the inconvenience."

Operations at some of the firms located at the Kaesong Industrial Complex have been halted because their supply of raw materials was cut off. Two apparel companies have already stopped their production processes, while another firm is only partially operating.

[Soundbite] Han Jae-gwon (Chairman, Kaesong Industrial Business Association) : "The gas supply was cut off yesterday so some firms had to stop some of their production lines."

To make things worse, a three-day holiday period starts in North Korea today. Firms at the Kaesong Industrial Complex are running out of food supplies and fuel. They could run out of their reserves completely this coming weekend because they only have a week's worth of supplies. If the firms run out of fuel, the operation of some 250 commute buses transporting North Korean workers will also be halted. The South Korean government and the representatives of the firms located in Kaesong are demanding the normalization of the industrial park's operations as soon as possible. But North Korea only keeps saying that it could withdraw its workers from the industrial complex altogether. On Thursday morning, North Korea's request for information on the number of workers at the Kaesong Industrial Complex led to some confusion as South Korean authorities misunderstood it as Pyongyang's intention to withdraw its workers.

5. Brain Wave Tech


[Anchor Lead]

If you ever thought of making an animal do something with your mind, that might just be possible. Korean scientists have invented a brain wave transferring device that’s a lot like telepathy.

[Pkg]

A woman whose arms and legs are paralyzed moves a robot's arm around using brain signals. She can also drink using its arm. Electrodes planted in her head send brain signals to the robot. For something like this to normally happen, a brain surgery is required. But a team at Harvard University led by Professor Yoo Seung-schik developed a new technology of transmitting brain waves without having to go under the knife. A person with sensors attached to the head views a computer screen. When the object on the screen blinks, brain wave vibrations expand. This is conveyed to the mouse and it starts to move its tail.

[Soundbite] Prof. Yoo Seung-schik (Harvard University) : "Without planting electrodes in the brain through surgery but instead using supersonic waves, we can stimulate the deepest parts of the brain."

This is the first time human brain signals have made a living animal move. What’s left now is applying this to humans instead of mice.

[Soundbite] Prof. Jeong Yong-an (Catholic Univ. of Korea Incheon St. Mary's Hospital) : "It’s opened a way for treating patients with depression or mental illnesses by transferring person’s senses and normal brain waves to a depressed person."

If the technology can be further advanced, we can expect an era where a person can transmit his thoughts via brain waves to another person.

6. Reforestation Efforts


[Anchor Lead]

Today is Arbor Day. Steady reforestation efforts have allowed the nation to recover from much of the devastation of the nation’s mountain forests from the Korean War 60 years ago. Let’s take a look at some scenes released by the National Archives of Arbor Day events of the 1960s and '70s.

[Pkg]

The Korean War left the country in ashes and with bald, barren mountains. In an effort to prevent natural calamities, such as floodings and landslides, soldiers and even women were called in to plant trees.

[Soundbite] Daehan News (1961) : "Those mobilized here are mainly forestry officers from each province. Restoration is proceeding according to schedule."

The stumbling block in fostering lush greenery was insects. Pesticides were sprayed when insects such as the fall webworm plagued the mountains. Vermin extermination was held as an annual public campaign. In the spring, the prevention of mountain fires was the top task. It takes dozens of years to restore hills and rivers devastated by war.

[Soundbite] Daehan News (1984) : "It's extremely difficult to put out raging forest fires. Being aware of sparks is taking care of the mountain."

Fire prevention campaigns targeting mountain climbers were the same back then as they are now. Images of Korea's past forestation efforts can be viewed at the National Archives of Korea's Web site.

7. By-Election Run-Up

[Anchor Lead]

On Thursday, candidate registration began for the upcoming by-elections. The ruling and opposition parties are stepping up their campaigns.

[Pkg]

The Saenuri Party held an executive meeting in Nowon-C District, where competition is expected to be the most severe. The party promised to resolve the district's issues. Candidate Huh Joon-young stressed that only someone who knows the needs of the local residents can help them improve their standards of living.

[Soundbite] Huh Joon-young (Nowon-C District Saenuri Candidate) : "Words aren't enough. You need to have been a worker yourself and also know others that have done the same."

Candidate Ahn Cheol-soo, pledged for "new politics." Earlier, the main opposition Democratic United Party decided to forego the by-elections in order to help him. Ahn says that the upcoming by-elections will change the political dynamics in Korea and stood up against the Park Geun-hye administration.

[Soundbite] Ahn Cheol-soo (Nowon-C District Independent Candidate) : "If the Park administration fails to innovate itself, we’ll keep it in check using new politics and set it right."

Unified Progressive Party contender Jeong Tae-heung and Progressive Justice Party Kim Ji-seon also registered for the race. The DUP will hold emergency committee meetings next week in Yeongdo, Busan and South Chungcheong Province including Cheongyang and Buyeo to step up its campaign. Representative Moon Jae-in will likely support the party's candidate in Busan's Yeongdo District. Candidate registration for the by-elections ends today. The official election campaign period starts April 11.

8. Finding Sound

[Anchor Lead]

As any car owner knows, strange noises you hear while driving can be a huge headache. Now, a portable sound camera has been developed that can detect where the noise is coming from.

[Pkg]

The door of a car producing noise is shot by a portable sound camera. Just as in using a heat detection camera, the location of various levels of noise is shown in different colors on the screen. As indicated by the camera, the problem inside the door was found, mended and fixed, causing the noise to disappear. The camera, a global first, is jointly developed by the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology and a private firm. It can pick up abnormal sounds and locate worn out parts and damaged areas.

[Soundbite] Kim Yeong-gi (Joint Developer) : "We developed a high frequency sound camera capable of measuring various sounds using digital technology."

30 micro phones arranged in a spiral shape and a high definition camera serve to show the distribution of noise in colors and locate the origin of the noise. The camera also received a prize at the Red Dot design award, which is one of the three global design competitions, for its ergonomic design.

[Soundbite] Prof. Bae Seok-hyeong (KAIST) : "Since it's an all in one camera there's no need to assemble the microphones. It can also measure a narrow spot or the floor of a car. It's user friendly."

The portable sound camera has been in use by a Korean automaker since February while the firm is developing new car models.

9. Ramyeon Nation

[Anchor Lead]

Ramyeon, one of the most adored comfort foods in Korea, is celebrating its 50th anniversary in the country this year. Food companies, well aware of the love the public has for the dish, are always busy trying to spark a new ramyeon trend and cash in.

[Pkg]

The Korean Internet teems with different ways of cooking ramyeon. Among the many brands, a combination of Chinese-style noodles called jajangmyeon and a spicy type of ramyeon is the latest hit. The blend called "Jjapaguri" became popular after being introduced on a TV show.

[Soundbite] "The Chiense-style jajang ramyeon is a bit greasy. The spicy seasoning adds flavor and makes it taste better."

Ramyeon is so beloved in Korea that there are even buffets where you can whip up your own deluxe dish. Customers are greeted with a feast of instant noodles and different toppings. Pots and burners are also set up and ready to go. This buffet is especially popular among young people. Ramyeon aficionados always have their own particular way of cooking up the simple dish that they claim is the best. One of the most important steps to boiling up the perfect bowl of ramyeon is not overcooking the noodles. A KBS team conducted a test with the help of a ramyeon producer. We compared two bowls that were cooked in different ways. One was prepared in the time-honored fashion. With the other, the noodles were repeatedly exposed to the air while being cooked. But in the end, they both tasted basically the same. Many Koreans believe that the foam formed on the top of ramyeon during cooking should be removed because it’s not supposed to be good for you. But this is just another urban legend surrounding this legendary dish.

[Soundbite] Prof. Im Gyeong-suk (University of Suwon) : "The foam isn’t impurities. They’re produced when protein or carbohydrate is disintegrated. It’s not harmful to the human body. However, it can smells bad sometimes. Removing the foam makes food taste better."

Another aspect of much disagreement is when you should add the powdered seasoning. We also put this to the test. Once again, they both tasted pretty much the same.

[Soundbite] Kim Yeong-jong (Researcher, Ramyeon Manufacturing Firm) : "We measured the condition and taste. There was a small difference. But it could be an experimental error. If you add the seasoning first, it has the effect of raising the boiling point. However, the effect is insignificant."

The widespread appeal of instant noodles has nothing to do with its healthful properties, as it’s far from being a healthy dish. But there are some ways of making it a bit better for you. First up is ramyeon made with basic veggies most people have in their fridge. You make your own sauce for this recipe. Then the vegetables, sauce and noodles are joined into a dish that’s much healthier than your average instant noodles. Next is ramyeon with sprouts. Make an anchovy broth first and cook your noodles in it. Then, simply chuck in as many sprouts as you like. The key to great ramyeon is the additions. If you pick the right extra ingredients, you can make your ramyeon a lot more nutritious.

[Soundbite] Lee Ha-jin (Student, Cooking Class) : "Stirred ramyeon is spicy and served with different vegetables. It’s like a decent dish."

For five decades in Korea, ramyeon has continued to evolve but it is still very close to the hearts of Koreans.
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