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NIS Probe Resumes
입력 2013.07.30 (15:37) 수정 2013.07.30 (16:03) News Today
자동재생
동영상영역 시작
동영상영역 끝
[Anchor Lead]

A National Assembly probe into allegations that the National Intelligence Service interfered with the last presidential election has resumed after a three-day disruption. But the political battles continue, with the two opposing parties failing to agree on which witnesses to call.

[Pkg]

[Soundbite] Rep. Shin Ki-nam(Chairman, Special committee investigating the NIS) : "On behalf of the special committee, I’m sorry."

The National Assembly investigation into the National Intelligence Service's meddling in the last presidential election resumed after three days with the chairman's apology. But the two sides failed to agree on which witnesses to question. The opposition Democratic Party said the 20 officials which both sides agreed on should be called first. Those officials include former NIS chief Won Sei-hoon and ex-Commissioner of Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency Kim Yong-pan. The opposition camp also demanded that Saenuri Party official Kim Moo-sung, Korean ambassador to China Kwon Young-se and even former President Lee Myung-bak be included in the witness list.

[Soundbite] Rep. Jung Cheong-rae(Democratic Party) : "I don't think it was committed by Won alone. So we need to summon former President Lee Myung-bak to find out whether Won condoned, approved, or ordered the act."

In response, the ruling Saenuri Party demanded that incumbent Democratic Party members be questioned over the allegation that they had promised a high-ranking position to an NIS agent in return for inside information as well as the human rights violation of an NIS employee. They also made it clear that Representative Kim Moo-sung and Ambassador Kwon cannot be called as witnesses.

[Soundbite] Rep. Kweon Seong-dong(Saenuri Party) : "It’s a political assault to call a witness simply over a probability of involvement and not because there is proof."

The witness list must be completed by tomorrow if a public hearing is to open on August 7th as agreed by both sides. But coming to a conclusion won’t be easy as the two sides remain far apart with their views.

2. An Uncertain Fate

[Anchor Lead]

An uncertain fate awaits the Kaesong Industrial Complex. More inter-Korean talks on reopening the joint business park may still take place but if an agreement isn’t reached, the last remaining cross-border project will probably be shut down. That will likely mean a deep freeze for bilateral relations.

[Pkg]

Operations at the Kaesong Industrial Complex were suspended 113 days ago. South Korean firms based there say next month would be the deadline to resume operations at the joint industrial park given the production schedules and the aging of the facilities of the factories there. Corporate representatives who recently visited Kaesong say North Korean officials also want the complex to be normalized. Analysts believe a shutdown of the complex is also a burden to Pyongyang. Right after the sixth round of inter-Korean negotiations on the Kaesong issue failed to produce results, North Korea said the talks are on the verge of falling apart rather than directly declaring the negotiations have failed. The Kaesong dilemma is pertinent to both Koreas. This is why a possible seventh meeting could take place. Even if it opens, striking an agreement will be tough. Experts point out it's crucial that the North, which had shut down the complex in the first place, should be the one responsible to reopen it.

[Soundbite] Prof. Im Eul-chul(Inst. of Far Eastern Studies, Kyungnam Univ.) : "The key would be for the North’s ruling party and military to make a proactive decision to normalize the complex."

South Korea made its final offer for talks to the North. But Seoul says the proposed talks reflect its resolve to revive the complex and South Korean businesses operating there. If the two Koreas, however, fail to reach a deal, the Kaesong factory zone will inevitably have to close after ten years since it was built and inter-Korean relations are most likely to freeze up as well.

3. Nuclear Display

[Anchor Lead]

North Korean soldiers wearing packs emblazoned with radioactive symbols were seen in a military parade held in Pyongyang last weekend to commemorate Armistice Day. The display was probably designed to play up the nation’s nuclear capabilities, and the packs were unlikely to be small nuclear weapons.

[Pkg]

North Korean soldiers wearing backpacks come out on top of vehicles. The backpacks can be seen having radioactive signs on them. This suggests that the soldiers belong to a nuclear bomb unit. Such backpack nukes are small enough for soldiers to carry and set up on their own. They can be detonated by use of remote control. With the spread of the nuclear fallout, such miniature weapons are capable of destroying and killing an entire division.

[Soundbite] Yang Uk(Korea Defense & Security Forum) : "Backpack nukes were developed as strategic bombs during the Cold War era. The United States once had them on the Korean peninsula but withdrew them after the end of the Cold War."

However, the South Korean military is skeptical about North Korea's ability to produce such backpack nukes. Highly sophisticated technology is needed, but experts don't think the regime’s technology has reached a level that’s advanced enough. Taking a look at nuclear warheads for instance, the U.S. has the ability to produce warheads weighing 110 kilograms, and Russia, 255 kilograms. But North Korea has not succeeded in making such weapons weighing less than a thousand kilograms. South Korean military authorities believe that the regime presented the soldiers wearing the backpacks to show off its nuclear weapons capabilities during the parade, since it failed to reveal any new weapons this time like it did in the past.

4. Cyber Security

[Anchor Lead]

Cyber terrorism concerns are growing as cyberattacks could be used to greater effect than traditional weapons. The United States, China and even North Korea are working to raise cyber security forces, but South Korea has a long way to go.

[Pkg]

In 2010, the Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant in Iran had suddenly stopped working. This was because the United States infiltrated a malicious code called Stuxnet into Iran's uranium enrichment facility. The malicious code altered just one number in the nuclear power plant's operation program but plant operation was suspended for a full year. KBS conducted an experiment using a malicious code similar to Stuxnet. The regular computer program is programmed to inject air into a balloon for five seconds. A malicious code can change the amount of time air is injected into 100 seconds, in which case the balloon pops.

[Soundbite] Prof. Lee Sang-jin(Korea University) : "If the power plant turbine spins over 100 times faster than normal, the plant is in danger of exploding just like the balloon."

With the growing view that malicious computer codes can be deadlier than fighter jets or missiles, countries around the world are exerting efforts to expand their cyber security force. It's not a stretch to say that modern day warfare could take place in cyber space. Therefore, the military must foster cyber security experts known as white hackers in order to be prepared in the event of a cyber-war.

5. Friend or Foe?

[Anchor Lead]

Naver, the biggest domestic portal site, has come under fire, being called an online predator that preys on smaller Web businesses. Now, the firm has laid out measures for seeking cooperation with smaller online ventures including the creation of a multi-million dollar fund. But critics say the measures are far from sufficient.

[Pkg]

This is a memo app for a smartpad that was developed by a Korean venture firm and released early this year. The app became popular, and a similar one began to appear on Naver not long after. The company argues that Naver copied its idea. Small-scale businesses ranging from real estate to shopping are facing losses and often find there's no room for them when the much larger Naver advances into their sectors. The portal has been under fire for infringing on the business rights of the cyber space version of mom and pop stores or the small online players. It has announced a set of measures to ease the criticism. Naver promises to support venture startups and facilitate online content through a 90 million U.S. dollar fund. It will also form a consultation body with partner companies and support such promising content to advance into overseas markets. But there are worries that Naver's cooperation with small firms will only strengthen the existing Naver-oriented market structure.

[Soundbite] Prof. Kim In-seong(Hanyang University) : "Naver is basically seeking to add a little more to its list of beneficiary firms. It's difficult to view this as fixing the problem or seeking a win-win deal."

Experts are rather calling for institutional measures to regulate Naver's market monopoly.

6. Troubled Waters

[Anchor Lead]

Summer fun in rivers and waterways can quickly turn into a life-threatening situation during Korea’s monsoon season, and this year has seen several deaths. But local governments, police and the emergency call line 119 have not taken any active action to prevent water-related accidents.

[Pkg]

A woman was stuck in a rising river. She was suddenly swept away by rapids. Fortunately, the woman was rescued by her friend. Heavy torrential rains hit the upper part of the Seomjin River. But the lower part had only a brief light drizzle. The water level in the lower part of the river rose one-point-six meters in two hours. But no measures were taken to prevent possible accidents.

[Soundbite] "Official, Yeongsan River Flood Control Office: It was an accident that happened at a low water level. We don't issue warnings under such conditions."

Local government officials, police officers and firefighters did not evacuate people from the riverside area.

[Soundbite] "Official, Suncheon Fire Station: If we had been notified in advance, we would have done something to prevent such accidents. But we were not given any notice yesterday."

Another problem is the negligence by vacationers in keeping themselves safe. Despite warnings against possible hazards, they would still go fishing and swimming in the river. Water-related accidents continue to occur during the vacation season due to the lack of a good disaster prevention system and vacationers' safety awareness.

7. Smoking Bans

[Anchor Lead]

Bans on smoking are expanding, with a district office in Seoul pushing to bar smoking around colleges. But some are up in arms about the campaign, calling it excessive.

[Pkg]

An average of 40-thousand people hang out in this neighborhood of a university each day in Seoul. Some can be seen smoking on the street.

[Soundbite] "Please vote on whether to designate this street as a non-smoking zone"

More than 80 percent of the one-thousand people surveyed support the designation of the area as a non-smoking zone. The district office decided to enforce the ban in a 250 meter-street between the university and a nearby subway station. The rule will go into effect starting next year and violators will be fined some 89 U.S. dollars. Though places like parks and bus stops are witnessing the same, this is the first time the ban will take place in an area near a university. There are more measures aimed at prohibiting smoking on sidewalks near other colleges including Korea, Kyunghee and Soongsil Universities. However, some are opposing the move to expand the ban, calling it much too excessive. District offices are considering increasing the number of smoking areas inside universities to alleviate such opposition.

8. Kite Surfing

[Anchor Lead]

Kite surfing has come to Korea, and is quickly gaining popularity here. Take a look.

[Pkg]

Kite surfing is becoming the latest trend among people who enjoy extreme leisure activities. About one-point-five million people around the world go kite surfing, which is a combination of paragliding and windsurfing. Kite surfers harness the power of the wind to ride the waves with the help of huge kites. The new sport is appealing to thrill seekers.

[Soundbite] Kim Ok-yeon(Kite Surfer) : "It’s speedy and exciting. I can jump in the air."

Jumping makes kite surfing the most attractive aspect to extreme sports fans. Kite surfers can jump into the air by up to ten meters if the wind is helping them. This is why the power of the wind is an important factor for the sport. Winds blowing at least four meters per second are best for kite surfing. Kite surfers are trying to get the sport to be an official event at the 2020 Summer Olympic Games.

9. Fire with Fire

[Anchor Lead]

Many Koreans believe that the best way to refresh yourself on a scorching summer day is to fight fire with fire by eating something super hot. Here are some popular dishes that are used to try and beat the heat.

[Pkg]

During heat waves, Koreans flock to certain restaurants. The leading so-called “stamina food” in summer is samgyetang, a hot chicken and ginseng stew. This place is crowded with people who think they can battle the heat with a steaming bowl.

[Soundbite] "There are many summer health dishes but I believe samgyetang is the best."

Samgyetang is chicken stuffed with sticky rice and various herbs boiled in broth for a long time. This chicken stew is said to revive the appetite and help release stress. After being so long on the boil, the broth is to be savored. Then it’s time to tuck in to the chicken. Koreans swear that the sweating induced by the hot soup leaves you feeling rejuvenated. This is the classic example of fighting fire with fire in the sweltering Korean summer.

[Soundbite] Kim Seung-hui(Customer) : "It's hot in the summer but to have warm food is still wonderful."

But samgyetang isn’t the only summer stamina food. There are plenty of other interesting concoctions. Inside this pressure cooker is a dish of chicken and seafood. The name of the dish, palboktang, roughly translates as eight-blessing stew, because it features eight types of seafood. The natural flavor of the ingredients is brought out with sun-dried sea salt. No other seasoning is used. The result is a simple yet satisfying flavor.

[Soundbite] Kim Wan-sik(Customer) : "Eating hot food in the sultry weather and sweating is a way to ease stress and pump up your energy. I believe the hotter it gets, the hotter the food."

The secret to the stew lies in the freshness of the ingredients. Buying the freshest seafood is essential. Then you add a chicken filled with a dozen different medicinal herbs to the mix. Everything is boiled up in the same pot.

[Soundbite] Go Bok-ja(Owner, Summer Specialty Restaurant) : "Chicken and eight different types of seafood go in. It's a really healthy dish, so we named it “eight blessings.”"

Palboktang is a feast for both the eyes and the stomach.

[Soundbite] Yun Won-sik(Customer) : "The harmony of Navy and Army makes the best dish I've ever had. I think it will really boost your stamina."

Koreans believe that a wide range of dishes can help give you the energy you need to get through the muggy summer. They also say there’s a scientific basis for the belief that hot food helps on hot days.

[Soundbite] Dr. Lee Seung-nam(Family Medicine Practitioner) : "People sweat a lot in summer. By eating hot food, your body gets equal with the outside temperature and discharges hot physical energy which enhances metabolism. So it’s good to beat the heat with heat. Waste matter is also released through your sweat and this better adjusts your reflexes."

The summer saps your energy and your appetite, but Koreans believe they have just the ticket to get you back on your feet.
  • NIS Probe Resumes
    • 입력 2013-07-30 15:30:56
    • 수정2013-07-30 16:03:29
    News Today
[Anchor Lead]

A National Assembly probe into allegations that the National Intelligence Service interfered with the last presidential election has resumed after a three-day disruption. But the political battles continue, with the two opposing parties failing to agree on which witnesses to call.

[Pkg]

[Soundbite] Rep. Shin Ki-nam(Chairman, Special committee investigating the NIS) : "On behalf of the special committee, I’m sorry."

The National Assembly investigation into the National Intelligence Service's meddling in the last presidential election resumed after three days with the chairman's apology. But the two sides failed to agree on which witnesses to question. The opposition Democratic Party said the 20 officials which both sides agreed on should be called first. Those officials include former NIS chief Won Sei-hoon and ex-Commissioner of Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency Kim Yong-pan. The opposition camp also demanded that Saenuri Party official Kim Moo-sung, Korean ambassador to China Kwon Young-se and even former President Lee Myung-bak be included in the witness list.

[Soundbite] Rep. Jung Cheong-rae(Democratic Party) : "I don't think it was committed by Won alone. So we need to summon former President Lee Myung-bak to find out whether Won condoned, approved, or ordered the act."

In response, the ruling Saenuri Party demanded that incumbent Democratic Party members be questioned over the allegation that they had promised a high-ranking position to an NIS agent in return for inside information as well as the human rights violation of an NIS employee. They also made it clear that Representative Kim Moo-sung and Ambassador Kwon cannot be called as witnesses.

[Soundbite] Rep. Kweon Seong-dong(Saenuri Party) : "It’s a political assault to call a witness simply over a probability of involvement and not because there is proof."

The witness list must be completed by tomorrow if a public hearing is to open on August 7th as agreed by both sides. But coming to a conclusion won’t be easy as the two sides remain far apart with their views.

2. An Uncertain Fate

[Anchor Lead]

An uncertain fate awaits the Kaesong Industrial Complex. More inter-Korean talks on reopening the joint business park may still take place but if an agreement isn’t reached, the last remaining cross-border project will probably be shut down. That will likely mean a deep freeze for bilateral relations.

[Pkg]

Operations at the Kaesong Industrial Complex were suspended 113 days ago. South Korean firms based there say next month would be the deadline to resume operations at the joint industrial park given the production schedules and the aging of the facilities of the factories there. Corporate representatives who recently visited Kaesong say North Korean officials also want the complex to be normalized. Analysts believe a shutdown of the complex is also a burden to Pyongyang. Right after the sixth round of inter-Korean negotiations on the Kaesong issue failed to produce results, North Korea said the talks are on the verge of falling apart rather than directly declaring the negotiations have failed. The Kaesong dilemma is pertinent to both Koreas. This is why a possible seventh meeting could take place. Even if it opens, striking an agreement will be tough. Experts point out it's crucial that the North, which had shut down the complex in the first place, should be the one responsible to reopen it.

[Soundbite] Prof. Im Eul-chul(Inst. of Far Eastern Studies, Kyungnam Univ.) : "The key would be for the North’s ruling party and military to make a proactive decision to normalize the complex."

South Korea made its final offer for talks to the North. But Seoul says the proposed talks reflect its resolve to revive the complex and South Korean businesses operating there. If the two Koreas, however, fail to reach a deal, the Kaesong factory zone will inevitably have to close after ten years since it was built and inter-Korean relations are most likely to freeze up as well.

3. Nuclear Display

[Anchor Lead]

North Korean soldiers wearing packs emblazoned with radioactive symbols were seen in a military parade held in Pyongyang last weekend to commemorate Armistice Day. The display was probably designed to play up the nation’s nuclear capabilities, and the packs were unlikely to be small nuclear weapons.

[Pkg]

North Korean soldiers wearing backpacks come out on top of vehicles. The backpacks can be seen having radioactive signs on them. This suggests that the soldiers belong to a nuclear bomb unit. Such backpack nukes are small enough for soldiers to carry and set up on their own. They can be detonated by use of remote control. With the spread of the nuclear fallout, such miniature weapons are capable of destroying and killing an entire division.

[Soundbite] Yang Uk(Korea Defense & Security Forum) : "Backpack nukes were developed as strategic bombs during the Cold War era. The United States once had them on the Korean peninsula but withdrew them after the end of the Cold War."

However, the South Korean military is skeptical about North Korea's ability to produce such backpack nukes. Highly sophisticated technology is needed, but experts don't think the regime’s technology has reached a level that’s advanced enough. Taking a look at nuclear warheads for instance, the U.S. has the ability to produce warheads weighing 110 kilograms, and Russia, 255 kilograms. But North Korea has not succeeded in making such weapons weighing less than a thousand kilograms. South Korean military authorities believe that the regime presented the soldiers wearing the backpacks to show off its nuclear weapons capabilities during the parade, since it failed to reveal any new weapons this time like it did in the past.

4. Cyber Security

[Anchor Lead]

Cyber terrorism concerns are growing as cyberattacks could be used to greater effect than traditional weapons. The United States, China and even North Korea are working to raise cyber security forces, but South Korea has a long way to go.

[Pkg]

In 2010, the Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant in Iran had suddenly stopped working. This was because the United States infiltrated a malicious code called Stuxnet into Iran's uranium enrichment facility. The malicious code altered just one number in the nuclear power plant's operation program but plant operation was suspended for a full year. KBS conducted an experiment using a malicious code similar to Stuxnet. The regular computer program is programmed to inject air into a balloon for five seconds. A malicious code can change the amount of time air is injected into 100 seconds, in which case the balloon pops.

[Soundbite] Prof. Lee Sang-jin(Korea University) : "If the power plant turbine spins over 100 times faster than normal, the plant is in danger of exploding just like the balloon."

With the growing view that malicious computer codes can be deadlier than fighter jets or missiles, countries around the world are exerting efforts to expand their cyber security force. It's not a stretch to say that modern day warfare could take place in cyber space. Therefore, the military must foster cyber security experts known as white hackers in order to be prepared in the event of a cyber-war.

5. Friend or Foe?

[Anchor Lead]

Naver, the biggest domestic portal site, has come under fire, being called an online predator that preys on smaller Web businesses. Now, the firm has laid out measures for seeking cooperation with smaller online ventures including the creation of a multi-million dollar fund. But critics say the measures are far from sufficient.

[Pkg]

This is a memo app for a smartpad that was developed by a Korean venture firm and released early this year. The app became popular, and a similar one began to appear on Naver not long after. The company argues that Naver copied its idea. Small-scale businesses ranging from real estate to shopping are facing losses and often find there's no room for them when the much larger Naver advances into their sectors. The portal has been under fire for infringing on the business rights of the cyber space version of mom and pop stores or the small online players. It has announced a set of measures to ease the criticism. Naver promises to support venture startups and facilitate online content through a 90 million U.S. dollar fund. It will also form a consultation body with partner companies and support such promising content to advance into overseas markets. But there are worries that Naver's cooperation with small firms will only strengthen the existing Naver-oriented market structure.

[Soundbite] Prof. Kim In-seong(Hanyang University) : "Naver is basically seeking to add a little more to its list of beneficiary firms. It's difficult to view this as fixing the problem or seeking a win-win deal."

Experts are rather calling for institutional measures to regulate Naver's market monopoly.

6. Troubled Waters

[Anchor Lead]

Summer fun in rivers and waterways can quickly turn into a life-threatening situation during Korea’s monsoon season, and this year has seen several deaths. But local governments, police and the emergency call line 119 have not taken any active action to prevent water-related accidents.

[Pkg]

A woman was stuck in a rising river. She was suddenly swept away by rapids. Fortunately, the woman was rescued by her friend. Heavy torrential rains hit the upper part of the Seomjin River. But the lower part had only a brief light drizzle. The water level in the lower part of the river rose one-point-six meters in two hours. But no measures were taken to prevent possible accidents.

[Soundbite] "Official, Yeongsan River Flood Control Office: It was an accident that happened at a low water level. We don't issue warnings under such conditions."

Local government officials, police officers and firefighters did not evacuate people from the riverside area.

[Soundbite] "Official, Suncheon Fire Station: If we had been notified in advance, we would have done something to prevent such accidents. But we were not given any notice yesterday."

Another problem is the negligence by vacationers in keeping themselves safe. Despite warnings against possible hazards, they would still go fishing and swimming in the river. Water-related accidents continue to occur during the vacation season due to the lack of a good disaster prevention system and vacationers' safety awareness.

7. Smoking Bans

[Anchor Lead]

Bans on smoking are expanding, with a district office in Seoul pushing to bar smoking around colleges. But some are up in arms about the campaign, calling it excessive.

[Pkg]

An average of 40-thousand people hang out in this neighborhood of a university each day in Seoul. Some can be seen smoking on the street.

[Soundbite] "Please vote on whether to designate this street as a non-smoking zone"

More than 80 percent of the one-thousand people surveyed support the designation of the area as a non-smoking zone. The district office decided to enforce the ban in a 250 meter-street between the university and a nearby subway station. The rule will go into effect starting next year and violators will be fined some 89 U.S. dollars. Though places like parks and bus stops are witnessing the same, this is the first time the ban will take place in an area near a university. There are more measures aimed at prohibiting smoking on sidewalks near other colleges including Korea, Kyunghee and Soongsil Universities. However, some are opposing the move to expand the ban, calling it much too excessive. District offices are considering increasing the number of smoking areas inside universities to alleviate such opposition.

8. Kite Surfing

[Anchor Lead]

Kite surfing has come to Korea, and is quickly gaining popularity here. Take a look.

[Pkg]

Kite surfing is becoming the latest trend among people who enjoy extreme leisure activities. About one-point-five million people around the world go kite surfing, which is a combination of paragliding and windsurfing. Kite surfers harness the power of the wind to ride the waves with the help of huge kites. The new sport is appealing to thrill seekers.

[Soundbite] Kim Ok-yeon(Kite Surfer) : "It’s speedy and exciting. I can jump in the air."

Jumping makes kite surfing the most attractive aspect to extreme sports fans. Kite surfers can jump into the air by up to ten meters if the wind is helping them. This is why the power of the wind is an important factor for the sport. Winds blowing at least four meters per second are best for kite surfing. Kite surfers are trying to get the sport to be an official event at the 2020 Summer Olympic Games.

9. Fire with Fire

[Anchor Lead]

Many Koreans believe that the best way to refresh yourself on a scorching summer day is to fight fire with fire by eating something super hot. Here are some popular dishes that are used to try and beat the heat.

[Pkg]

During heat waves, Koreans flock to certain restaurants. The leading so-called “stamina food” in summer is samgyetang, a hot chicken and ginseng stew. This place is crowded with people who think they can battle the heat with a steaming bowl.

[Soundbite] "There are many summer health dishes but I believe samgyetang is the best."

Samgyetang is chicken stuffed with sticky rice and various herbs boiled in broth for a long time. This chicken stew is said to revive the appetite and help release stress. After being so long on the boil, the broth is to be savored. Then it’s time to tuck in to the chicken. Koreans swear that the sweating induced by the hot soup leaves you feeling rejuvenated. This is the classic example of fighting fire with fire in the sweltering Korean summer.

[Soundbite] Kim Seung-hui(Customer) : "It's hot in the summer but to have warm food is still wonderful."

But samgyetang isn’t the only summer stamina food. There are plenty of other interesting concoctions. Inside this pressure cooker is a dish of chicken and seafood. The name of the dish, palboktang, roughly translates as eight-blessing stew, because it features eight types of seafood. The natural flavor of the ingredients is brought out with sun-dried sea salt. No other seasoning is used. The result is a simple yet satisfying flavor.

[Soundbite] Kim Wan-sik(Customer) : "Eating hot food in the sultry weather and sweating is a way to ease stress and pump up your energy. I believe the hotter it gets, the hotter the food."

The secret to the stew lies in the freshness of the ingredients. Buying the freshest seafood is essential. Then you add a chicken filled with a dozen different medicinal herbs to the mix. Everything is boiled up in the same pot.

[Soundbite] Go Bok-ja(Owner, Summer Specialty Restaurant) : "Chicken and eight different types of seafood go in. It's a really healthy dish, so we named it “eight blessings.”"

Palboktang is a feast for both the eyes and the stomach.

[Soundbite] Yun Won-sik(Customer) : "The harmony of Navy and Army makes the best dish I've ever had. I think it will really boost your stamina."

Koreans believe that a wide range of dishes can help give you the energy you need to get through the muggy summer. They also say there’s a scientific basis for the belief that hot food helps on hot days.

[Soundbite] Dr. Lee Seung-nam(Family Medicine Practitioner) : "People sweat a lot in summer. By eating hot food, your body gets equal with the outside temperature and discharges hot physical energy which enhances metabolism. So it’s good to beat the heat with heat. Waste matter is also released through your sweat and this better adjusts your reflexes."

The summer saps your energy and your appetite, but Koreans believe they have just the ticket to get you back on your feet.
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