기사 본문 영역

상세페이지

Suspicious Requests
입력 2013.09.04 (15:15) 수정 2013.09.04 (15:40) News Today
자동재생
동영상영역 시작
동영상영역 끝
[Anchor Lead]

It’s been confirmed: United Progressive Party representative Lee Seok-ki requested 30 documents from the Ministry of Defense, including the joint ROK-U.S. readiness plans for sporadic North Korean provocations and other classified materials.

[Pkg]

In March, South Korea and the United States established a set of joint readiness plans for North Korea's localized provocations, after two years of discussions. It lays out how the two nations would launch a joint response in case of a North Korean provocation such as the shelling of Yeonpyeong Island. The plan was designated as level-2 classified information. In April, the South Korean military finalized the deal to purchase the Apache Guardian as its next generation attack helicopter. The Ministry of Defense reported that Representative Lee Seok-ki had demanded such classified information and materials of major military projects. Lee reportedly asked for 30 pieces of materials regarding the changes in the future ROK-U.S. command structure, purchases of attack helicopters and unmanned reconnaissance aircrafts, as well as the military bases in Jeju and Pyeongtaek. After reviewing Lee's request, the Ministry of Defense handed over the materials excluding any sensitive information.

[Soundbite] Rep. Yoo Ki-june(Saenuri Party) : "Military cooperation with NATO, the military situation and deployment status are highly sensitive information."

[Soundbite] Kim Kwan-jin(National Defense Minister) : "Those items were not included in the presented materials. We presented the information that was already released to the press by the Defense Ministry."

The Defense Ministry added that other members of the United Progressive Party had also asked for 40 additional pieces of info. According to the Ministry, the UPP was never allowed to view the classified files. In response, the UPP said the request was made to the Office of the Prime Minister through appropriate channels to prepare for the parliamentary hearings on government ministries.

2. Finding Links

[Anchor Lead]

The National Intelligence Service says it’s zeroing in on its investigation into whether the so-called “Revolutionary Organization” is associated with North Korea. The NIS is looking for proof that will back up circumstantial evidence linking the two.

[Pkg]

Back in 1999, the public security authorities found that the so-called People's Revolutionary Party was formed and supervised by North Korea. At the time, Representative Lee Seok-ki was sentenced to five months in prison. After his release, he formed another entity, which is now known as "Revolutionary Organization." The National Intelligence Service strongly believes that like its predecessor, the RO is also linked to North Korea. The NIS is zeroing in on the fact that certain members of the Revolutionary Organization, such as Kim Geun-rae, who are being investigated as suspects, visited North Korea. But the purpose of their visits and their activities in the North have yet to be clarified. The NIS also believes that the items that were found during raids last month have something to do with North Korea. They include a lecture plan on how to run an organization according to the North Korean revolution theory and a text on Korea's reunification written by People Workers' Party member Kim Yong-sun. The NIS is trying to find direct evidence that RO members contacted the North directly. The investigators are tracing RO members' email accounts because they presumably contacted the North using Google's Gmail to keep their activities confidential.

3. Chun Summoned

[Anchor Lead]

Former Korean President Chun Doo-hwan’s second son has been summoned by prosecutors as a suspect in a slush fund investigation. He returned home early today after 18 hours of questioning.

[Pkg]

Chun Jae-yong stepped out of the prosecutors' office building today at around 1:40 a.m. With a tired look, he bowed and apologized when asked by reporters if he admitted to the charges.

[Soundbite] Chun Jae-yong(Fmr. President Chun’s Son) : "(Is it true you bought real estate overseas using your father's fortune?) I apologize again for the many worries I caused. I'm so sorry. "

When asked if he was willing to pay back the fines voluntarily, he said he'll speak about the issue later and left the possibility open. Prosecutors were planning to call him in around Thursday but Chun showed up early on his own. It's assumed that there was no way he could resist the summons as investigators already discovered the shares that were purchased under borrowed names and blank bonds connected to the Chun family. The probe on Chun Jae-yong will be focused on three charges: allegedly conspiring with his uncle Lee Chang-seok, illegally receiving a plot of land in the Osan, Gyeonggi Province and evading corporate taxes. He's also believed to have purchased a luxury home in the U.S. through his wife Park Sang-ah after which he hid away slush funds. He's also suspected of money laundering the funds at his firm. With his older brother and first son Chun Jae-guk also expected to be called in for questioning, pressure on his household will likely intensify.

4. NK Ski Slope

[Anchor Lead]

North Korea appears poised to join the world of winter sports, building a ski slope in Masikryeong near Mt. Kumgang. This comes amid speculation over whether the two Koreas could co-host the 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Olympic Games.

[Pkg]

The construction site of Masikryeong Skiing Ground is located about a hundred kilometers northwest of Mount Kumgang. North Korea is deploying its military troops and technicians to complete the construction within this year. North Korea's International Olympic Committee member Chang Woong said in his recent interview with a U.S. media agency that when the skiing ground is built, it can be used to host international competitions and even Olympic games. Back in September 1 the North Korean vice minister of Physical Culture and Sports said in his interview with Japanese media that the North could provide Masikryeong Skiing Ground for the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics. The Stalinist state is apparently trying to lure foreign tourists and counter some of the western countries' efforts to stop their exports of skiing equipment to the North. The North is also trying to speed up the resumption of Mount Kumgang tours by discussing the co-hosting of the Winter Olympics. Experts say the outcome depends solely on the inter-Korean relations because the co-hosting of the Olympic Games requires a lot of preparation.

5. Fishy Products

[Anchor Lead]

Safety concerns over seafood imports are on the rise amid reports of radioactive leakage coming from Japan’s Fukushima nuclear power plant. Fish are usually on the menu during the Chuseok thanksgiving holiday throughout Korea. Here are some tips on how to tell apart domestic and imported fish ahead of the holiday.

[Pkg]

Just one look at the labels of origin show there’s barely any Japanese products at fish markets these days. But consumers are still concerned over radiation. False labeling was discovered the most with croakers, hairtails, mackerels and red sea breams. It's said that Japanese red sea breams in particular can be disguised as domestic. If the pink fish's color is a bit strong and there are clear bluish green spots near the side lines on the fish's back, it's possible that it’s a Japanese import. Yellow croakers caught at home can be mixed up with Chinese fish but the Korean ones have red lips and diamond shaped protrusions. Meanwhile the Chinese fish sports a golden belly and the distance from the stomach to the back is fairly long. If thorns on the back fins are especially long, such croakers may have been imported from the African country of Guinea. Korean mackerels which only travel in Korean waters have thinner and less visible greenish wave patterns on their bodies. Authorities are launching a clampdown over fish vendors tinkering with place of origin labels ahead of high Chuseok holiday demand.

6. Delivery Mayhem

[Anchor Lead]

Korea's post office and delivery companies have their hands full ahead of the Chuseok holiday, which is now just two weeks away. Here's more on how Chuseok gifts are delivered.

[Pkg]

Trucks stand in line late in the evening in front of a logistics center. The parcels are automatically sorted out according to their destination and sent to the local post offices. With so many parcels that need to be processed, the center doesn't close even at night. Delivery companies are busier than ever with the Chuseok holiday just two weeks away. Their employees have to report to work an hour earlier than usual. They load heavy boxes onto handcarts and deliver them to customers' doorsteps. They say packing large parcels requires special techniques.

[Soundbite] Won Jeong-hui(Mail Carrier, Yeouido Post Office) : "The size of the box should match the size of the contents so that everything is firmly fixed inside. If the box is too big, put something inside to prevent the contents from moving."

Department stores are also busy sending gift sets to their customers. This year their Chuseok gift sales surged more than 20 percent. The best-selling gift items this year are relatively cheap ones, such as fruit, meat and ham. The amount of parcels is expected to peak between September 9 and 11. Those who have yet to send Chuseok gifts should do it by the end of this week if they want their gifts to arrive before the holiday period begins.

7. Night Owl Buses

[Anchor Lead]

People returning home late after work or gatherings with coworkers have typically had to hail a cab. But starting midnight September 12th, late night buses will start running across the capital of Seoul through 5 a.m.

[Pkg]

The last of the regularly-scheduled city bus leaves at around 1 a.m. but a late night one comes along. Here, it's known as the night owl bus. Passengers heading home past midnight pile into the bus at each station.

[Soundbite] Yun Hyeon-jeong(Passenger) : "I'm thankful. If you take a cab at this hour, you have to pay extra so it’s great."

Seoul City operated a trial using two night bus routes for nearly four months and found that some 220-thousand people used them. That’s 59 percent higher than an ordinary bus. Seoul City will add seven more and run a total of nine late night routes starting September 12th at midnight. Eight of the nine pass through key downtown areas of Jongno, Gwanghwamun and Seoul Station. One route circles the city outskirts allowing people to transfer to other lines. The basic fare for the night buses is 1,850 won or about one U.S. dollar and 70 cents. They travel less frequently with one every 40 minutes. If such late-night buses are further utilized, Seoul City expects that the subway can close earlier since demand is low for late metro hours. Furthermore, citizens can be less concerned about grabbing a cab.

8. Culture Expo 2013

[Anchor Lead]

The feature performance of the Istanbul-Gyeongju World Culture Expo 2013 "Flying" has earned acclaim even in Turkey. "Flying" has been touted as the next in line to succeed the popular Korean nonverbal musicals "Nanta" and "Jump."

[Pkg]

Skillful somersaults, breathtaking cheerleading stunts performed in the mid-air and even a flying circus. This performance took Turkish spectators by storm. They were particularly impressed when the cast invited the audience on stage. The audience gives a standing ovation to the performers for their mesmerizing movements and stage techniques.

[Soundbite] Turkish Audience Member : "The traditional costume was beautiful. I was impressed seeing the woman who had successfully lost weight flying in the air."

This contemporary musical set in the ancient Silla Dynasty has drawn the attention of Turkish media and experts.

[Soundbite] Ishmael(Director, Performance Center) : "This dance shows vicissitudes of life from the royal era to the modern day."

The musical debuted in 2011 and was exported to Singapore last year. Now it's also a huge hit in Istanbul.

9. Picking Hot Peppers

[Anchor Lead]

If you’ve ever tried Korean food, you’ll know that hot peppers are an indispensable part of many Korean dishes. But peppers add more than a spicy kick to your favorite foods; they also boost your immunity to certain diseases thanks to a compound called capsaicin. Here are some tips on picking top-quality peppers.

[Pkg]

Yeongyang in North Gyeongsang Province is Korea's top producer of hot peppers. By the shade of their parasols, women pick peppers in a field. Ripe red peppers shine under the sizzling sun.

[Soundbite] "They’re sweet, watery and delicious."

[Soundbite] "They’re big, pretty, fat like me and nutritious. "

Peppers are harvested four times a year. This is the second crop of the year; which is said to be the most delicious. This year's yield is high. Workers are busy plucking peppers off the vine.

[Soundbite] Park In-yeop(Pepper Farmer) : "My village is located in a clean and alpine region. The big temperature gap between daily lows and highs makes peppers thick, sweet and hot."

After the harvest, farmers separate the bad peppers from the good.

[Soundbite] Jeong Gyeong-nam(Pepper Farmer) : "We pick out unripened peppers. We remove leaves and stalks. We put only best-quality peppers in the boxes."

Consumers in the city want good-quality peppers at a good price. At a recent event, people got their chance to buy their peppers directly from farmers. The Seoul Plaza pepper festival. People flock to this event to buy peppers ahead of the chuseok thanksgiving holiday and the annual kimchi-making season known as gimjang.

[Soundbite] "I’m going to share with my daughter and daughter-in-law."

[Soundbite] "I’ll use them to make kimchi and hot pepper paste. "

But choosing the right pepper isn’t always easy. Dried peppers are divided into two types: sun-dried and machine-dried. Sun-dried peppers are more preferred. Peppers that are dried out under the sun are glossy and their seeds rattle inside. But the quality of machine-dried peppers has improved with the development of technology to dry them up quickly at low temperatures.

[Soundbite] Gwon Gi-jun(Yeongyang Red Pepper Trade Corporation) : "The peppers were washed in clean water and dried up in a scientific method. So their color and nutrients are well preserved. Consumers can eat our peppers without any worries."

Here are some cooking tips for preserving the nutrients found in peppers. When you use raw peppers, it’s better to put them on the heat shortly before turning it off.

[Soundbite] Kim Deok-nyeo(Director, Inst. of Traditional Korean Food) : "Peppers are the most nutritious when they are eaten raw. When you cook it, it should be the last ingredient to go into the pot. In this way, you don't destroy the vitamin C contained in peppers."

Peppers are a good match with soybean paste. Peppers make up for what soybean paste lacks in vitamins. Meanwhile, soybean paste is rich in protein; in short supply in peppers. Peppers also go well with fish or meat. Their nutrients are better preserved in oil. And making hot pepper oil at home is a snap. Put the oil to a boil, turn off the fire and add your pepper powder and chopped garlic.

[Soundbite] "It can be stored for a long time, because it doesn't easily go bad. "

The addition of beef makes hot pepper paste even better. First, stir the beef, chopped spring onions and garlic, sugar and sesame oil together in a pot. Next, add water and hot pepper paste and boil them for a short while. Hot peppers are a favorite among Koreans. And you too can enjoy this vegetable's spicy kick, pungent taste and healthy nutrients.
  • Suspicious Requests
    • 입력 2013-09-04 15:09:01
    • 수정2013-09-04 15:40:05
    News Today
[Anchor Lead]

It’s been confirmed: United Progressive Party representative Lee Seok-ki requested 30 documents from the Ministry of Defense, including the joint ROK-U.S. readiness plans for sporadic North Korean provocations and other classified materials.

[Pkg]

In March, South Korea and the United States established a set of joint readiness plans for North Korea's localized provocations, after two years of discussions. It lays out how the two nations would launch a joint response in case of a North Korean provocation such as the shelling of Yeonpyeong Island. The plan was designated as level-2 classified information. In April, the South Korean military finalized the deal to purchase the Apache Guardian as its next generation attack helicopter. The Ministry of Defense reported that Representative Lee Seok-ki had demanded such classified information and materials of major military projects. Lee reportedly asked for 30 pieces of materials regarding the changes in the future ROK-U.S. command structure, purchases of attack helicopters and unmanned reconnaissance aircrafts, as well as the military bases in Jeju and Pyeongtaek. After reviewing Lee's request, the Ministry of Defense handed over the materials excluding any sensitive information.

[Soundbite] Rep. Yoo Ki-june(Saenuri Party) : "Military cooperation with NATO, the military situation and deployment status are highly sensitive information."

[Soundbite] Kim Kwan-jin(National Defense Minister) : "Those items were not included in the presented materials. We presented the information that was already released to the press by the Defense Ministry."

The Defense Ministry added that other members of the United Progressive Party had also asked for 40 additional pieces of info. According to the Ministry, the UPP was never allowed to view the classified files. In response, the UPP said the request was made to the Office of the Prime Minister through appropriate channels to prepare for the parliamentary hearings on government ministries.

2. Finding Links

[Anchor Lead]

The National Intelligence Service says it’s zeroing in on its investigation into whether the so-called “Revolutionary Organization” is associated with North Korea. The NIS is looking for proof that will back up circumstantial evidence linking the two.

[Pkg]

Back in 1999, the public security authorities found that the so-called People's Revolutionary Party was formed and supervised by North Korea. At the time, Representative Lee Seok-ki was sentenced to five months in prison. After his release, he formed another entity, which is now known as "Revolutionary Organization." The National Intelligence Service strongly believes that like its predecessor, the RO is also linked to North Korea. The NIS is zeroing in on the fact that certain members of the Revolutionary Organization, such as Kim Geun-rae, who are being investigated as suspects, visited North Korea. But the purpose of their visits and their activities in the North have yet to be clarified. The NIS also believes that the items that were found during raids last month have something to do with North Korea. They include a lecture plan on how to run an organization according to the North Korean revolution theory and a text on Korea's reunification written by People Workers' Party member Kim Yong-sun. The NIS is trying to find direct evidence that RO members contacted the North directly. The investigators are tracing RO members' email accounts because they presumably contacted the North using Google's Gmail to keep their activities confidential.

3. Chun Summoned

[Anchor Lead]

Former Korean President Chun Doo-hwan’s second son has been summoned by prosecutors as a suspect in a slush fund investigation. He returned home early today after 18 hours of questioning.

[Pkg]

Chun Jae-yong stepped out of the prosecutors' office building today at around 1:40 a.m. With a tired look, he bowed and apologized when asked by reporters if he admitted to the charges.

[Soundbite] Chun Jae-yong(Fmr. President Chun’s Son) : "(Is it true you bought real estate overseas using your father's fortune?) I apologize again for the many worries I caused. I'm so sorry. "

When asked if he was willing to pay back the fines voluntarily, he said he'll speak about the issue later and left the possibility open. Prosecutors were planning to call him in around Thursday but Chun showed up early on his own. It's assumed that there was no way he could resist the summons as investigators already discovered the shares that were purchased under borrowed names and blank bonds connected to the Chun family. The probe on Chun Jae-yong will be focused on three charges: allegedly conspiring with his uncle Lee Chang-seok, illegally receiving a plot of land in the Osan, Gyeonggi Province and evading corporate taxes. He's also believed to have purchased a luxury home in the U.S. through his wife Park Sang-ah after which he hid away slush funds. He's also suspected of money laundering the funds at his firm. With his older brother and first son Chun Jae-guk also expected to be called in for questioning, pressure on his household will likely intensify.

4. NK Ski Slope

[Anchor Lead]

North Korea appears poised to join the world of winter sports, building a ski slope in Masikryeong near Mt. Kumgang. This comes amid speculation over whether the two Koreas could co-host the 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Olympic Games.

[Pkg]

The construction site of Masikryeong Skiing Ground is located about a hundred kilometers northwest of Mount Kumgang. North Korea is deploying its military troops and technicians to complete the construction within this year. North Korea's International Olympic Committee member Chang Woong said in his recent interview with a U.S. media agency that when the skiing ground is built, it can be used to host international competitions and even Olympic games. Back in September 1 the North Korean vice minister of Physical Culture and Sports said in his interview with Japanese media that the North could provide Masikryeong Skiing Ground for the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics. The Stalinist state is apparently trying to lure foreign tourists and counter some of the western countries' efforts to stop their exports of skiing equipment to the North. The North is also trying to speed up the resumption of Mount Kumgang tours by discussing the co-hosting of the Winter Olympics. Experts say the outcome depends solely on the inter-Korean relations because the co-hosting of the Olympic Games requires a lot of preparation.

5. Fishy Products

[Anchor Lead]

Safety concerns over seafood imports are on the rise amid reports of radioactive leakage coming from Japan’s Fukushima nuclear power plant. Fish are usually on the menu during the Chuseok thanksgiving holiday throughout Korea. Here are some tips on how to tell apart domestic and imported fish ahead of the holiday.

[Pkg]

Just one look at the labels of origin show there’s barely any Japanese products at fish markets these days. But consumers are still concerned over radiation. False labeling was discovered the most with croakers, hairtails, mackerels and red sea breams. It's said that Japanese red sea breams in particular can be disguised as domestic. If the pink fish's color is a bit strong and there are clear bluish green spots near the side lines on the fish's back, it's possible that it’s a Japanese import. Yellow croakers caught at home can be mixed up with Chinese fish but the Korean ones have red lips and diamond shaped protrusions. Meanwhile the Chinese fish sports a golden belly and the distance from the stomach to the back is fairly long. If thorns on the back fins are especially long, such croakers may have been imported from the African country of Guinea. Korean mackerels which only travel in Korean waters have thinner and less visible greenish wave patterns on their bodies. Authorities are launching a clampdown over fish vendors tinkering with place of origin labels ahead of high Chuseok holiday demand.

6. Delivery Mayhem

[Anchor Lead]

Korea's post office and delivery companies have their hands full ahead of the Chuseok holiday, which is now just two weeks away. Here's more on how Chuseok gifts are delivered.

[Pkg]

Trucks stand in line late in the evening in front of a logistics center. The parcels are automatically sorted out according to their destination and sent to the local post offices. With so many parcels that need to be processed, the center doesn't close even at night. Delivery companies are busier than ever with the Chuseok holiday just two weeks away. Their employees have to report to work an hour earlier than usual. They load heavy boxes onto handcarts and deliver them to customers' doorsteps. They say packing large parcels requires special techniques.

[Soundbite] Won Jeong-hui(Mail Carrier, Yeouido Post Office) : "The size of the box should match the size of the contents so that everything is firmly fixed inside. If the box is too big, put something inside to prevent the contents from moving."

Department stores are also busy sending gift sets to their customers. This year their Chuseok gift sales surged more than 20 percent. The best-selling gift items this year are relatively cheap ones, such as fruit, meat and ham. The amount of parcels is expected to peak between September 9 and 11. Those who have yet to send Chuseok gifts should do it by the end of this week if they want their gifts to arrive before the holiday period begins.

7. Night Owl Buses

[Anchor Lead]

People returning home late after work or gatherings with coworkers have typically had to hail a cab. But starting midnight September 12th, late night buses will start running across the capital of Seoul through 5 a.m.

[Pkg]

The last of the regularly-scheduled city bus leaves at around 1 a.m. but a late night one comes along. Here, it's known as the night owl bus. Passengers heading home past midnight pile into the bus at each station.

[Soundbite] Yun Hyeon-jeong(Passenger) : "I'm thankful. If you take a cab at this hour, you have to pay extra so it’s great."

Seoul City operated a trial using two night bus routes for nearly four months and found that some 220-thousand people used them. That’s 59 percent higher than an ordinary bus. Seoul City will add seven more and run a total of nine late night routes starting September 12th at midnight. Eight of the nine pass through key downtown areas of Jongno, Gwanghwamun and Seoul Station. One route circles the city outskirts allowing people to transfer to other lines. The basic fare for the night buses is 1,850 won or about one U.S. dollar and 70 cents. They travel less frequently with one every 40 minutes. If such late-night buses are further utilized, Seoul City expects that the subway can close earlier since demand is low for late metro hours. Furthermore, citizens can be less concerned about grabbing a cab.

8. Culture Expo 2013

[Anchor Lead]

The feature performance of the Istanbul-Gyeongju World Culture Expo 2013 "Flying" has earned acclaim even in Turkey. "Flying" has been touted as the next in line to succeed the popular Korean nonverbal musicals "Nanta" and "Jump."

[Pkg]

Skillful somersaults, breathtaking cheerleading stunts performed in the mid-air and even a flying circus. This performance took Turkish spectators by storm. They were particularly impressed when the cast invited the audience on stage. The audience gives a standing ovation to the performers for their mesmerizing movements and stage techniques.

[Soundbite] Turkish Audience Member : "The traditional costume was beautiful. I was impressed seeing the woman who had successfully lost weight flying in the air."

This contemporary musical set in the ancient Silla Dynasty has drawn the attention of Turkish media and experts.

[Soundbite] Ishmael(Director, Performance Center) : "This dance shows vicissitudes of life from the royal era to the modern day."

The musical debuted in 2011 and was exported to Singapore last year. Now it's also a huge hit in Istanbul.

9. Picking Hot Peppers

[Anchor Lead]

If you’ve ever tried Korean food, you’ll know that hot peppers are an indispensable part of many Korean dishes. But peppers add more than a spicy kick to your favorite foods; they also boost your immunity to certain diseases thanks to a compound called capsaicin. Here are some tips on picking top-quality peppers.

[Pkg]

Yeongyang in North Gyeongsang Province is Korea's top producer of hot peppers. By the shade of their parasols, women pick peppers in a field. Ripe red peppers shine under the sizzling sun.

[Soundbite] "They’re sweet, watery and delicious."

[Soundbite] "They’re big, pretty, fat like me and nutritious. "

Peppers are harvested four times a year. This is the second crop of the year; which is said to be the most delicious. This year's yield is high. Workers are busy plucking peppers off the vine.

[Soundbite] Park In-yeop(Pepper Farmer) : "My village is located in a clean and alpine region. The big temperature gap between daily lows and highs makes peppers thick, sweet and hot."

After the harvest, farmers separate the bad peppers from the good.

[Soundbite] Jeong Gyeong-nam(Pepper Farmer) : "We pick out unripened peppers. We remove leaves and stalks. We put only best-quality peppers in the boxes."

Consumers in the city want good-quality peppers at a good price. At a recent event, people got their chance to buy their peppers directly from farmers. The Seoul Plaza pepper festival. People flock to this event to buy peppers ahead of the chuseok thanksgiving holiday and the annual kimchi-making season known as gimjang.

[Soundbite] "I’m going to share with my daughter and daughter-in-law."

[Soundbite] "I’ll use them to make kimchi and hot pepper paste. "

But choosing the right pepper isn’t always easy. Dried peppers are divided into two types: sun-dried and machine-dried. Sun-dried peppers are more preferred. Peppers that are dried out under the sun are glossy and their seeds rattle inside. But the quality of machine-dried peppers has improved with the development of technology to dry them up quickly at low temperatures.

[Soundbite] Gwon Gi-jun(Yeongyang Red Pepper Trade Corporation) : "The peppers were washed in clean water and dried up in a scientific method. So their color and nutrients are well preserved. Consumers can eat our peppers without any worries."

Here are some cooking tips for preserving the nutrients found in peppers. When you use raw peppers, it’s better to put them on the heat shortly before turning it off.

[Soundbite] Kim Deok-nyeo(Director, Inst. of Traditional Korean Food) : "Peppers are the most nutritious when they are eaten raw. When you cook it, it should be the last ingredient to go into the pot. In this way, you don't destroy the vitamin C contained in peppers."

Peppers are a good match with soybean paste. Peppers make up for what soybean paste lacks in vitamins. Meanwhile, soybean paste is rich in protein; in short supply in peppers. Peppers also go well with fish or meat. Their nutrients are better preserved in oil. And making hot pepper oil at home is a snap. Put the oil to a boil, turn off the fire and add your pepper powder and chopped garlic.

[Soundbite] "It can be stored for a long time, because it doesn't easily go bad. "

The addition of beef makes hot pepper paste even better. First, stir the beef, chopped spring onions and garlic, sugar and sesame oil together in a pot. Next, add water and hot pepper paste and boil them for a short while. Hot peppers are a favorite among Koreans. And you too can enjoy this vegetable's spicy kick, pungent taste and healthy nutrients.
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