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Japan Backlash
입력 2013.10.18 (15:03) 수정 2013.10.18 (15:53) News Today
자동재생
동영상영역 시작
동영상영역 끝
[Anchor Lead]

A recently uncovered document proving Japan’s sex slavery program during World War II has left the Shinzo Abe administration unfazed, drawing backlash from Japanese civic groups and politicians.

[Pkg]

A Japanese civic group held a meeting concerning the Japanese army's sex slavery controversy. Documents from an Indonesian court were recently disclosed proving that the Japanese army had forced women into sexual slavery. The Abe administration was criticized for not acknowledging this. The Japanese Communist Party member Seiken Akamine decided to send a questionnaire to the Prime Minister.

[Soundbite] Seiken Akamina (Japanese Communist Party): "Are you saying that taking women from the concentration camp to prostitute for soldiers was not done by force?"

Some say the Kono Statement was not sufficient enough of an apology to the victims and that more sincere measures were needed.

[Soundbite] Kobayashi (Head of Civic Group): "Victims are not accepting the Kono Statement. This means that it doesn't fully admit the historical fact."

Members of the meeting agreed that Tokyo must admit the historical facts and have decided to have politicians and civic groups cooperate in pressing the Abe administration.

2. Philippine State Visit

[Anchor Lead]

Philippine President Benigno Aquino is on a state visit to Korea.
In a summit with President Park Geun-hye, the leaders agreed to boost bilateral economic, cultural and defense cooperation.

[Pkg]

President Park Geun-hye and Philippine President Benigno Aquino III, her administration's first invited foreign leader to make a state visit to Korea, are greeted by the honor guards. The Philippines was the first country from the Association of Southeast Asian Nations that Korea forged diplomatic ties with. The ASEAN nation also fought alongside South Korea in the Korean War. In the summit meeting, President Park pitched her sales diplomacy but also stressed joint economic growth with the Philippines.

[Soundbite] Pres. Park Geun-hye: "I expect Presdient Aquino's visit will further solidify the two nations' win-win cooperative ties. "

The two leaders agreed to quickly conclude an export deal on Korea's light attack aircraft the FA-50. The two sides will also discuss the export of Korean convoys. They also agreed to boost defense industry cooperation. Investment in the Philippines' emerging market by Korean businesses will be expanded. And investment conditions will be improved for Korean firms to take part in various infrastructure projects in the Southeast Asian nation. Considering the 1.3 million people to people exchange between the two countries each year, protection and support for each other's people will also be strengthened. The two sides signed a memorandum of understanding in defense and sports cooperation, and also agreed that Korea provide loans from its Economic Development Cooperation Fund to Philippine disaster areas. The presidents also agreed joint efforts on denuclearizing North Korea and inducing real change from the communist regime. Over a state dinner, they further boosted the mutual trust and friendship of the two traditional allies.

3. Blocking Tax Evasion

[Anchor Lead]

A group of Asian countries will establish a joint tax system to curb offshore tax evasion. Tax commissioners of 16 Asian nations announced the decision at a summit taking place in Jeju Island.

[Pkg]

In Hong Kong, a city that's becoming Asia's financial hub along with Singapore, there's believed to be many bogus paper companies and overseas accounts owned by Koreans. But Korea's National Tax Service was limited in detecting offshore tax evasions to Hong Kong. This is because the two nations don't share a tax treaty. However, this may change in the near future.

[Soundbite] "Hong Kong Tax Commissioner "

The tax chiefs of Korea, Hong Kong and a total of 16 Asian countries have agreed to jointly respond to offshore tax dodging. Their gathering, known as the Study Group on Asian Tax Administration and Research, is being held in Korea's Jeju Island, and they've adopted a SGATAR declaration. Under the agreement, member nations will quickly respond to information requests from other countries and work to automatically share tax data on a regular basis in the near future. They will also actively respond to all sorts of tax evasions which even include the underground economy.

[Soundbite] Kim Duk-joong (National Tax Service Commissioner)

The Asian tax chiefs also agreed to set up a working consultation body chaired by Korea to discuss details of their joint measures.

4. By-election Campaigns

[Anchor Lead]

By-elections are just two weeks away and official campaigning has begun. Candidates representing ruling and opposition parties have launched their campaigns.

[Pkg]

In Hwaseong, Gyeonggi Province, on the first day of the official campaign period, Seo Cheong-won, the Saenuri Party's candidate pledged to advance the city's growth and urged voters for support. Meanwhile, Democratic Party candidate Oh Il-yong also asked for support, claiming that the current administration has deceived the people. Hong Sung-kyu of the Unified Progressive Party also ran his campaign in the city. Over in Pohang, North Gyeongsang Province, Saenuri Party candidate Park Myung-jae met with citizens at the fish market. Democratic Party candidate Heo Dae-man visited the traditional markets and asked for support. Unified Progressive Party candidate Park Shin-yong also met with voters. Leaders of the ruling and opposition parties supported their candidates in Pohang and Hwaseong.

[Soundbite] Hwang Woo-yea (Saenuri Party Leader): "Pohang is the birthplace of the president."

[Soundbite] Kim Han-gil (Democratic Party Leader): "If you think the administration is wrong and it must face judgment…"

The official campaigning period will continue for 13 days until the 29th.

5. Shooting Down Warheads

[Anchor Lead]

The Korean military has announced a new interceptor missile, the Patriot Advanced Capability-3 or PAC-3, which promises a greater capacity to knock nuclear warhead missiles out of the sky.

[Pkg]

The PAC-2 missile is a interceptor warhead that explodes near its target and destroys it using its shell fragments. But it's not able to fully take out missiles loaded with nuclear warheads. This is why the Korean military is seeking to adopt the PAC 3 that employs the "hit-to-kill" interception and directly strikes down the target.

[Soundbite] Kim Min-seok (Defense Ministry Spokesman): "The fragmentation-type is also powerful in intercepting missiles, but it doesn't always destroy everything thoroughly so Korea decided to introduce the PAC-3. "

In addition, the military is in the course of developing a missile that can reach higher than the PAC3. A descending ballistic missile moves at over 2 kilometers per second, faster than the speed of sound. The PAC 3 can intercept this as high as 15 kilometers above the ground. But rockets such as the mid- and long-range surface-to-air missiles that's being developed by the Korean military can travel higher to take down targets. The only issue is that it will take ten years to actually deploy them. Seoul could also consider purchasing the Standard Missile 3 (SM-3) or the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) from the US, but this was excluded for fears of inciting controversy over becoming incorporated into the US missile defense system. For now the military believes the best option is a joint Korean- and U.S.-customized deterrence strategy. The military says more important is the ability to first detect signs of an enemy attack and deter it and also says it will prioritize on projects regarding preemptive measures.

6. Oyster Woes

[Anchor Lead]

It’s oyster picking season on the Korean southern coast, but farmers are concerned about falling demand due to radiation fears.

[Pkg]

This is an oyster farm in the southern coast of Korea. Oysters fresh out from the sea are washed and packed in sacks. Fishermen are excited about the new oyster season.

[Soundbite] Lee Seong-gon (Oyster Farm Owner): "The harvest is pretty good. Though many died in the west the ones in the east are okay. The harvest seems about average."

Thousands of residents work here shucking oysters. As just seen here, oyster season has just begun and the oyster industry is quite busy. But concerns are rising because of the dropping consumption of seafood due to fears of radiation contamination. On the day's first auction, buyers are hesitant. The decrease of demand has lowered the price by about 30 percent from last year's to about four U.S. dollars and 70 cents per kilogram. Authorities say the oysters are safe from radiation as they're grown in waters off of Korea's coasts. Radiation tests are also conducted to mitigate the consumers' concerns.

[Soundbite] Choi Jeong-bok (Oyster Association): "Since oysters come from our coast, they aren’t affected by radiation. So consumers don't need to worry."

Following the halt of exports to the U.S. due to the Norovirus last year, the nation's oyster farms are facing yet another crisis.

7. Sea Turtle Rescue

[Anchor Lead]

A green sea turtle who goes by the name of “Dongbugi” has returned to the sea, after being rescued last year in waters off Geoje Island. Meanwhile, researchers here continue sea turtle preservation efforts.

[Pkg]

Dongbugi is a green sea turtle that was rescued in June last year from a fishing net in waters off Geoje Island, South Gyeongsang Province. The animal underwent medical treatment and since has grown to 80 centimeters in length and weighs 60 kilograms. Now it's ready to return to the wild with a small satellite tracking device attached to its back.

[Soundbite]

Dongbugi slowly approached the sea for the first time in a year and four months.
It headed to the waters off Jeju Island, Japan and southern China. These Hawksbill sea turtles were brought from Nagoya, Japan to study how they breed. There are only some 6000 female Hawksbills worldwide that can lay eggs. This species is known to take about five years to mature indoors. Breeding might be possible for them within a few years.

8. Entertainment News

[Anchor Lead]

In show business, the singer Nami has released her first new album in 17 years. Meanwhile child actress Kal So-won has been nominated for Best New Leading Acress at the Daejong Film Awards.

[Pkg]

Singer Nami is back after a 17-year hiatus. She released her new album for the first time since the release of her song "Persuasion" in 1996. She is to film a music video in the U.S. this month and release a digital single next month. Nami debuted at the age of 6 at the 8th U.S. Army and has released many hits, such as "Eternal Friend" and "Like an Indian Doll." Korean singers will hold a concert to mark the 23rd anniversary of late singer Kim Hyun-shik's death. The concert will be held on November 1 and 2 at the KBS Hall in Busan. Included in the lineup are Shinchon Blues, Kwon In-ha, and Jajeongeo Tan Punggyeong. The musicians will be paying tribute to the late singer with a nationwide tour. Child actress Kal So-won, who appeared in the movie "Miracle in Cell No.7," has been nominated for Best Leading Actress and Best New Actress at the Daejong Film Awards. The eight-year-old actress will be competing for the prestigious award with big names, such as Yoon Yeo-jung, Chang Young-nam, Uhm Jung-hwa and Moon Jung-hee. The Daejong Film Festival is to take place on November 1 at the KBS Hall in Seoul. It'll be broadcast live on KBS TV2.

9. Phone Side-Effects

[Anchor Lead]

It seems like everybody has a smartphone these days, but did you know that they can cause some minor health problems? Look out for these common smartphone side-effects.

[Pkg]

Smartphone screens are almost always smeared with fingerprints. When you hold your phone against your face, you may put yourself at risk of skin infections. We compared the bacteria found on a smartphone taken into the bathroom with the bacteria found in a toilet bowl. There were 30 times more bacteria on the smartphone than the toilet. This explains how smartphones cause skin problems.

[Soundbite] Dr. Sin Jong-hun (Dermatology): "If skin is exposed to bacteria on smartphones repeatedly, it could cause skin infection or acne."

Squinting at small text on the screen can give you wrinkles and cause dark circles to form. Holding your head down to look into the screen can also cause lines to form on your neck. These side-effects have given birth to the term "smartphone face."

[Soundbite] "Frowning from losing games on my smartphone is causing wrinkles on my forehead."

Choe Eun-ju watches a lot of videos on her smart phone. She says her eyes feel strained when she looks into the screen.

[Soundbite] Choe Eun-ju (Office Worker): "I download and watch videos on my smartphone while commuting or use it to find directions. I'm seeing an eye doctor because my eyes hurt and feel strained."

Watching videos on your phone actually causes people to blink less often. Normally people blink about 12 times per minute. But when on a smartphone, that drops to just six times a minute.

[Soundbite] Dr. Im Seok-beom (Ophthalmology): "You should keep your smartphone at least 30 cm away from your eyes and consciously blink more. If your eyes still feel dry and tired, you should apply a tear substitute."

The excessive use of smartphones can also cause joint problems. Sim Hye-min, who's still in his 20s, says his wrist has been bothering him lately.

[Soundbite] Sim Hye-min (Office Worker): "Since using the tablet PC and smartphone, I can't move my wrists well and I also feel numbness and pain."

Most users type on the keypad with their thumbs. To do so, you have to contort your wrists, which can cause carpal tunnel syndrome. Keeping your head down looking into your smartphone for long hours can lead to a forward head posture. Wrist and spinal pain can be relieved or prevented by correcting your posture and stretching your body frequently. As for preventing skin problems, using earphones when you're talking on the phone, wiping the screen with a wet tissue, or using a smartphone cover can help. Smartphones enrich our lives, but can also cause harm to health. Smarten up on how to use your device for best results.
  • Japan Backlash
    • 입력 2013-10-18 15:23:35
    • 수정2013-10-18 15:53:23
    News Today
[Anchor Lead]

A recently uncovered document proving Japan’s sex slavery program during World War II has left the Shinzo Abe administration unfazed, drawing backlash from Japanese civic groups and politicians.

[Pkg]

A Japanese civic group held a meeting concerning the Japanese army's sex slavery controversy. Documents from an Indonesian court were recently disclosed proving that the Japanese army had forced women into sexual slavery. The Abe administration was criticized for not acknowledging this. The Japanese Communist Party member Seiken Akamine decided to send a questionnaire to the Prime Minister.

[Soundbite] Seiken Akamina (Japanese Communist Party): "Are you saying that taking women from the concentration camp to prostitute for soldiers was not done by force?"

Some say the Kono Statement was not sufficient enough of an apology to the victims and that more sincere measures were needed.

[Soundbite] Kobayashi (Head of Civic Group): "Victims are not accepting the Kono Statement. This means that it doesn't fully admit the historical fact."

Members of the meeting agreed that Tokyo must admit the historical facts and have decided to have politicians and civic groups cooperate in pressing the Abe administration.

2. Philippine State Visit

[Anchor Lead]

Philippine President Benigno Aquino is on a state visit to Korea.
In a summit with President Park Geun-hye, the leaders agreed to boost bilateral economic, cultural and defense cooperation.

[Pkg]

President Park Geun-hye and Philippine President Benigno Aquino III, her administration's first invited foreign leader to make a state visit to Korea, are greeted by the honor guards. The Philippines was the first country from the Association of Southeast Asian Nations that Korea forged diplomatic ties with. The ASEAN nation also fought alongside South Korea in the Korean War. In the summit meeting, President Park pitched her sales diplomacy but also stressed joint economic growth with the Philippines.

[Soundbite] Pres. Park Geun-hye: "I expect Presdient Aquino's visit will further solidify the two nations' win-win cooperative ties. "

The two leaders agreed to quickly conclude an export deal on Korea's light attack aircraft the FA-50. The two sides will also discuss the export of Korean convoys. They also agreed to boost defense industry cooperation. Investment in the Philippines' emerging market by Korean businesses will be expanded. And investment conditions will be improved for Korean firms to take part in various infrastructure projects in the Southeast Asian nation. Considering the 1.3 million people to people exchange between the two countries each year, protection and support for each other's people will also be strengthened. The two sides signed a memorandum of understanding in defense and sports cooperation, and also agreed that Korea provide loans from its Economic Development Cooperation Fund to Philippine disaster areas. The presidents also agreed joint efforts on denuclearizing North Korea and inducing real change from the communist regime. Over a state dinner, they further boosted the mutual trust and friendship of the two traditional allies.

3. Blocking Tax Evasion

[Anchor Lead]

A group of Asian countries will establish a joint tax system to curb offshore tax evasion. Tax commissioners of 16 Asian nations announced the decision at a summit taking place in Jeju Island.

[Pkg]

In Hong Kong, a city that's becoming Asia's financial hub along with Singapore, there's believed to be many bogus paper companies and overseas accounts owned by Koreans. But Korea's National Tax Service was limited in detecting offshore tax evasions to Hong Kong. This is because the two nations don't share a tax treaty. However, this may change in the near future.

[Soundbite] "Hong Kong Tax Commissioner "

The tax chiefs of Korea, Hong Kong and a total of 16 Asian countries have agreed to jointly respond to offshore tax dodging. Their gathering, known as the Study Group on Asian Tax Administration and Research, is being held in Korea's Jeju Island, and they've adopted a SGATAR declaration. Under the agreement, member nations will quickly respond to information requests from other countries and work to automatically share tax data on a regular basis in the near future. They will also actively respond to all sorts of tax evasions which even include the underground economy.

[Soundbite] Kim Duk-joong (National Tax Service Commissioner)

The Asian tax chiefs also agreed to set up a working consultation body chaired by Korea to discuss details of their joint measures.

4. By-election Campaigns

[Anchor Lead]

By-elections are just two weeks away and official campaigning has begun. Candidates representing ruling and opposition parties have launched their campaigns.

[Pkg]

In Hwaseong, Gyeonggi Province, on the first day of the official campaign period, Seo Cheong-won, the Saenuri Party's candidate pledged to advance the city's growth and urged voters for support. Meanwhile, Democratic Party candidate Oh Il-yong also asked for support, claiming that the current administration has deceived the people. Hong Sung-kyu of the Unified Progressive Party also ran his campaign in the city. Over in Pohang, North Gyeongsang Province, Saenuri Party candidate Park Myung-jae met with citizens at the fish market. Democratic Party candidate Heo Dae-man visited the traditional markets and asked for support. Unified Progressive Party candidate Park Shin-yong also met with voters. Leaders of the ruling and opposition parties supported their candidates in Pohang and Hwaseong.

[Soundbite] Hwang Woo-yea (Saenuri Party Leader): "Pohang is the birthplace of the president."

[Soundbite] Kim Han-gil (Democratic Party Leader): "If you think the administration is wrong and it must face judgment…"

The official campaigning period will continue for 13 days until the 29th.

5. Shooting Down Warheads

[Anchor Lead]

The Korean military has announced a new interceptor missile, the Patriot Advanced Capability-3 or PAC-3, which promises a greater capacity to knock nuclear warhead missiles out of the sky.

[Pkg]

The PAC-2 missile is a interceptor warhead that explodes near its target and destroys it using its shell fragments. But it's not able to fully take out missiles loaded with nuclear warheads. This is why the Korean military is seeking to adopt the PAC 3 that employs the "hit-to-kill" interception and directly strikes down the target.

[Soundbite] Kim Min-seok (Defense Ministry Spokesman): "The fragmentation-type is also powerful in intercepting missiles, but it doesn't always destroy everything thoroughly so Korea decided to introduce the PAC-3. "

In addition, the military is in the course of developing a missile that can reach higher than the PAC3. A descending ballistic missile moves at over 2 kilometers per second, faster than the speed of sound. The PAC 3 can intercept this as high as 15 kilometers above the ground. But rockets such as the mid- and long-range surface-to-air missiles that's being developed by the Korean military can travel higher to take down targets. The only issue is that it will take ten years to actually deploy them. Seoul could also consider purchasing the Standard Missile 3 (SM-3) or the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) from the US, but this was excluded for fears of inciting controversy over becoming incorporated into the US missile defense system. For now the military believes the best option is a joint Korean- and U.S.-customized deterrence strategy. The military says more important is the ability to first detect signs of an enemy attack and deter it and also says it will prioritize on projects regarding preemptive measures.

6. Oyster Woes

[Anchor Lead]

It’s oyster picking season on the Korean southern coast, but farmers are concerned about falling demand due to radiation fears.

[Pkg]

This is an oyster farm in the southern coast of Korea. Oysters fresh out from the sea are washed and packed in sacks. Fishermen are excited about the new oyster season.

[Soundbite] Lee Seong-gon (Oyster Farm Owner): "The harvest is pretty good. Though many died in the west the ones in the east are okay. The harvest seems about average."

Thousands of residents work here shucking oysters. As just seen here, oyster season has just begun and the oyster industry is quite busy. But concerns are rising because of the dropping consumption of seafood due to fears of radiation contamination. On the day's first auction, buyers are hesitant. The decrease of demand has lowered the price by about 30 percent from last year's to about four U.S. dollars and 70 cents per kilogram. Authorities say the oysters are safe from radiation as they're grown in waters off of Korea's coasts. Radiation tests are also conducted to mitigate the consumers' concerns.

[Soundbite] Choi Jeong-bok (Oyster Association): "Since oysters come from our coast, they aren’t affected by radiation. So consumers don't need to worry."

Following the halt of exports to the U.S. due to the Norovirus last year, the nation's oyster farms are facing yet another crisis.

7. Sea Turtle Rescue

[Anchor Lead]

A green sea turtle who goes by the name of “Dongbugi” has returned to the sea, after being rescued last year in waters off Geoje Island. Meanwhile, researchers here continue sea turtle preservation efforts.

[Pkg]

Dongbugi is a green sea turtle that was rescued in June last year from a fishing net in waters off Geoje Island, South Gyeongsang Province. The animal underwent medical treatment and since has grown to 80 centimeters in length and weighs 60 kilograms. Now it's ready to return to the wild with a small satellite tracking device attached to its back.

[Soundbite]

Dongbugi slowly approached the sea for the first time in a year and four months.
It headed to the waters off Jeju Island, Japan and southern China. These Hawksbill sea turtles were brought from Nagoya, Japan to study how they breed. There are only some 6000 female Hawksbills worldwide that can lay eggs. This species is known to take about five years to mature indoors. Breeding might be possible for them within a few years.

8. Entertainment News

[Anchor Lead]

In show business, the singer Nami has released her first new album in 17 years. Meanwhile child actress Kal So-won has been nominated for Best New Leading Acress at the Daejong Film Awards.

[Pkg]

Singer Nami is back after a 17-year hiatus. She released her new album for the first time since the release of her song "Persuasion" in 1996. She is to film a music video in the U.S. this month and release a digital single next month. Nami debuted at the age of 6 at the 8th U.S. Army and has released many hits, such as "Eternal Friend" and "Like an Indian Doll." Korean singers will hold a concert to mark the 23rd anniversary of late singer Kim Hyun-shik's death. The concert will be held on November 1 and 2 at the KBS Hall in Busan. Included in the lineup are Shinchon Blues, Kwon In-ha, and Jajeongeo Tan Punggyeong. The musicians will be paying tribute to the late singer with a nationwide tour. Child actress Kal So-won, who appeared in the movie "Miracle in Cell No.7," has been nominated for Best Leading Actress and Best New Actress at the Daejong Film Awards. The eight-year-old actress will be competing for the prestigious award with big names, such as Yoon Yeo-jung, Chang Young-nam, Uhm Jung-hwa and Moon Jung-hee. The Daejong Film Festival is to take place on November 1 at the KBS Hall in Seoul. It'll be broadcast live on KBS TV2.

9. Phone Side-Effects

[Anchor Lead]

It seems like everybody has a smartphone these days, but did you know that they can cause some minor health problems? Look out for these common smartphone side-effects.

[Pkg]

Smartphone screens are almost always smeared with fingerprints. When you hold your phone against your face, you may put yourself at risk of skin infections. We compared the bacteria found on a smartphone taken into the bathroom with the bacteria found in a toilet bowl. There were 30 times more bacteria on the smartphone than the toilet. This explains how smartphones cause skin problems.

[Soundbite] Dr. Sin Jong-hun (Dermatology): "If skin is exposed to bacteria on smartphones repeatedly, it could cause skin infection or acne."

Squinting at small text on the screen can give you wrinkles and cause dark circles to form. Holding your head down to look into the screen can also cause lines to form on your neck. These side-effects have given birth to the term "smartphone face."

[Soundbite] "Frowning from losing games on my smartphone is causing wrinkles on my forehead."

Choe Eun-ju watches a lot of videos on her smart phone. She says her eyes feel strained when she looks into the screen.

[Soundbite] Choe Eun-ju (Office Worker): "I download and watch videos on my smartphone while commuting or use it to find directions. I'm seeing an eye doctor because my eyes hurt and feel strained."

Watching videos on your phone actually causes people to blink less often. Normally people blink about 12 times per minute. But when on a smartphone, that drops to just six times a minute.

[Soundbite] Dr. Im Seok-beom (Ophthalmology): "You should keep your smartphone at least 30 cm away from your eyes and consciously blink more. If your eyes still feel dry and tired, you should apply a tear substitute."

The excessive use of smartphones can also cause joint problems. Sim Hye-min, who's still in his 20s, says his wrist has been bothering him lately.

[Soundbite] Sim Hye-min (Office Worker): "Since using the tablet PC and smartphone, I can't move my wrists well and I also feel numbness and pain."

Most users type on the keypad with their thumbs. To do so, you have to contort your wrists, which can cause carpal tunnel syndrome. Keeping your head down looking into your smartphone for long hours can lead to a forward head posture. Wrist and spinal pain can be relieved or prevented by correcting your posture and stretching your body frequently. As for preventing skin problems, using earphones when you're talking on the phone, wiping the screen with a wet tissue, or using a smartphone cover can help. Smartphones enrich our lives, but can also cause harm to health. Smarten up on how to use your device for best results.
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