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Tight Spender
입력 2014.01.06 (15:26) 수정 2014.01.06 (15:53) News Today
자동재생
동영상영역 시작
동영상영역 끝
[Anchor Lead]

A surprising report shows that the South Korean government spends the least on social security among OECD member countries, just 13 percent of national funds. What does this mean for Korea’s aging society?

[Pkg]

As of 2011, the South Korean government spent 13.1 percent of the national funds on social security. That's the lowest rate among the member-countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. Denmark, Germany and Finland spent more than 43 percent of their funds on social security, while Japan spent 42.7 percent. In contrast, Korea spent the largest portion of its funds on improving the economy, which is 20.1 percent. Furthermore, over 15 percent of the government's funding went towards education, health care and public services respectively, while 8.6 percent went to national defense. The OECD member-nations were found to have spent an average of 35.6 percent on social security, 14.5 percent on health care, 13.6 on public services and 12.5 on education. Also, in 2012, the South Korean government's credibility level was 23 percent, the lowest ranking. The percentage of female government ministers in Korea was also the lowest - at 11.1 percent, which contrasts sharply with the OECD average of 24.9 percent. Meanwhile, the public's satisfaction with health care services was found to be the highest - at 68 percent.

2. Power Conflict

[Anchor Lead]

A new set of damage compensation laws aim to resolve conflicts between power authorities and those living near transmission lines. Residents say the compensation doesn’t go far enough.

[Pkg]

This is the home and stable of the 71-year-old Yu Han-suk who had committed suicide in December. Reportedly, Yu was greatly disappointed that she could not receive damage compensation, just because her home was 350 meters away from a power transmission line, 170 meters farther than the range eligible for direct payment.

[Soundbite] Yu Dong-hwan (Beavered Family): "There was a failure to implant the pig embryos during the fertilization process, which means we can’t raise pigs."

According to the newly legislated laws, cash payments are made to the land located within 33 meters on both sides of the power lines and to homes within 180 meters, but those within one kilometer are only eligible for indirect compensations. Residents balk at these new criteria, claiming that only a handful of people will stand to receive direct compensations.

[Soundbite] Baek Yeong-min (Member, Protest Committee): "No farmland is included within the 33-meter limit. The government-set price for forest land is between 20% and 25%, which amounts to only a few thousand dollars."

But the Korea Electric Power Corporation argues that the areas that fall under the compensation standards have increased up to 10 times from the previous level and that the residents living around power lines nationwide would stand to receive about 94.8 million dollars in additional redress.

[Soundbite] Jeong Du-ok (Korea Electric Power Corporation Official): "We plan to follow the law on compensating for the homes within a certain distance from the power lines."

The public is urging the authorities to come up with follow-up measures in order to appease the residents' ongoing protests.

3. Political Preparation

[Anchor Lead]

Politicians are already trying to get an edge in upcoming local elections. Independent lawmaker Ahn Cheol-soo is stepping into the fray with his own political party to compete with the Saenuri and Democratic Parties.

[Pkg]

Independent lawmaker Ahn Cheol-soo has again joined hands with former Environment Minister Yoon Yeo-joon. Yoon split from Ahn whom he had once mentored, but is now invited back to co-chair the steering committee for the establishment of a new party.

[Soundbite] Ahn Cheol-soo (Independent Lawmaker): "Experience and wisdom are the most important. He strongly believes that rational reforms are necessary."

The ruling Saenuri Party criticized Yoon's actions as flip-flopping and the opposition Democratic Party said that his political identity was vague. Four-time Saenuri representative Won Yoo-chul was the first one to announce his candidacy for governor of Gyeonggi Province. The party leadership is urging more experienced politicians, such as Chung Mong-joon, to consider running for other posts to boost the party's chances of winning.

[Soundbite] Rep. Hong Moon-jong (Saenuri Party): "I hope he can put his personal political plans aside and accept the party's requests."

From the Democratic Party another fourth-term representative, Won Hye-young, has joined the Gyeonggi gubernatorial race. The Democratic Party leaders are looking for a strong candidate who can win in the Honam region, against the Ahn Cheol-soo party that is overwhelmingly popular.

[Soundbite] Rep. Jun Byung-hun (Democratic Party): "I hope the local elections of 2014 will become a competition of policies, visions, and political figures."

Also, the Saenuri Party is pushing for the abolishment of district councils and reduction of consecutive terms allowed for mayors of major cities, while the Democratic Party is opposing the shutdown of district councils.

4. Social Enterprises

[Anchor Lead]

Social enterprises include companies that either hire the socially underprivileged or provide services to them. Here’s a closer look at some of these organizations and the work they’re doing.

[Pkg]

This man was seriously injured seven years ago in a car accident, which caused him to be severely disabled. He has been dealing with strong social bias ever since.

[Soundbite] Gang Seong-jin (Brain Disorder Level III): "When I had job interviews they would tell me that my physical condition was not suitable for work."

Kang was able to land a job at a small social enterprise that produces eco-friendly stationery products. Fourteen out of its 19 employees either have some form of a disability or a big gap in their employment history.

[Soundbite] Kim Jun-ho (CEO, Simwon Tech): "We solve social problems that regular companies can’t through corporate activity."

Hiring people with disabilities is not the only precondition to gain employment at a social enterprise. This theater company was designated as an exemplary social enterprise last year. Most of its 180 employees are students. They dedicate their efforts to protecting the environment and eradicating school violence. The students teach acting skills and help aspiring actors to make their debuts. For nine years, they have been providing education services and staging performances for socially marginalized people.

[Soundbite] U Seung-ju (Head, Theater Company “Flying Car”): "We consider educating people free of charge and putting on their show to be our greatest service."

Thanks to social enterprises, the underprivileged and physically challenged can benefit in many ways, whether by finding jobs and or getting a chance to grow.

5. Poised for Gold

[Anchor Lead]

In a rehearsal for next month’s Winter Olympic Games in Sochi, Russia, figure skating champion Kim Yuna won South Korea’s national championship.

[Pkg]

The queen of figure skating stages an enrapturing performance to "Adios Nonino." Donning a purple costume, Kim Yu-na showed off her artistic talent to the fullest and her motions impressed the jury with their vigor, while her spins were flawless. She made a mistake while performing a double axel, but her overall performance was mesmerizing enough to repay her domestic fans for their love and support. Kim Yu-na received 147.26 points in free skating. Her overall score was 227.86 points, which is just 0.7 points short of her world record.

[Soundbite] Kim Yu-na (National Figure Skater): "It felt good to compete in the final season in Korea and put on a good performance."

At the awarding ceremony, Kim performed the double axel again to express her gratitude. Kim's final rehearsal was perfect. Now she's poised to win her second Olympic gold medal in Sochi.

6. Credit Delinquency

[Anchor Lead]

Weighed down by high college tuition costs, more and more students are looking to borrow money to pay for their education. This leads to the danger of credit delinquency, a growing problem.

[Pkg]

This scholarship foundation lends money for college tuition. The foundation gets many inquiries for student loans. They are mostly from students who are not eligible for state scholarships or whose aids are not enough. This third-year student already has borrowed 19 thousand dollars so far. She is already worried about paying back the loan after her graduation.

[Soundbite] Mun Ji-eun (College Student): "It's already a problem. I'm already worried about paying back the student loan after I get a job."

In the second semester of 2013 alone, some 390 thousand students received student loans, which comes to an average of about 3,220 dollars per student. The number of credit delinquents who could not pay back the loans has also soared from 26 thousand in 2010 to 42 thousand in 2013. Some of the students who are not eligible for loans even resort to high-interest private lenders.

[Soundbite] An Dae-chan (Korea Student Aid Foundation Official): "Private lenders sometimes have very high interest rates. Be sure to avoid them and apply for government-sponsored student loans instead."

The average annual tuition for a private college stands at more than 7,000 dollars. As long as Korea's college tuition remains the second highest among OECD members, many Korean college students will continue to be deep in debt even before they start their careers.

7. Remote Control

[Anchor Lead]

With the aid of the internet, smartphones can be tapped as a remote control for just about any appliance. Here’s a look at how this technology is being applied.

[Pkg]

A man remote-controls a mini fan on his desk via his smartphone from outside the office.

[Soundbite] "Go, mini fan!"

The mini fan begins operating at his order.

[Soundbite] "Hello, light!"

He can also turn on a light from far away. Everyday home appliances can be remote-controlled if they are planted with sensors and connected to the Internet. The Korea Electronics Technology Institute developed the technology to operate smart home systems through the Internet. Various sources of technologies are open to anyone who wants to use them for developing new smart systems.

[Soundbite] Kim Jae-ho (Korea Electronics Technology Institute): "They can be a basis for business start-ups and small companies to quickly turn their bright, creative ideas into good business models."

For example, a small Korean company developed a smart flower pot that provides the proper levels of light and water to plants by measuring room temperature and humidity. The U.S., Japanese and Chinese governments have begun supporting companies to develop technologies that use these revolutionary means. The Korean government is also set to provide full support to the development of similar smart technologies.

8. Warm Reception

[Anchor Lead]

Korea’s unique underfloor heating system, known as “ondol,” has been the best way to keep warm on the Peninsula for hundreds of years. Now this style of heating is gaining popularity in China.

[Pkg]

Apartments are under construction in Xian, China. The apartments have the Korean-style heating system known as "ondol." Under the floor, there are pipes that circulate hot water, causing the home to warm up. The Korean-type heating system is warmer and more energy-efficient than radiators that are commonly used in Chinese apartments. So the Korean-style heating system is gaining popularity in China. Houses using the ondol heating system are only about 20 percent more expensive than those that are heated by radiators. The Korean-style heating system was installed in some 100-thousand Chinese apartments in 2012 alone. Korean heating system companies are establishing regional offices and factories in China to cash in on the new business boom. A Korean heating system firm entered the Chinese market in 2000. Its sales have grown 30 times over the past 12 years.

[Soundbite] Kim Byeong-gon (Head, Kiturami Boiler China Corporation): "We’ve been working to promote the merits of the ondol heating system in China. The Chinese are seeing the Korean heating system positively, resulting a growth in our sales."

Ondol is the latest hit that Korea has exported to China.

9. Sprouts & Health

[Anchor Lead]

Bean sprouts are an important part of the Korean diet, widely believed to be one of the best cures for a hangover. They're not so popular in other Asian cuisines, but they are considered essential here.

[Pkg]

Homemakers are out shopping for their groceries. Many of them buy tofu and bean sprouts. These two ingredients alone make up almost half their dinner menu. Bean sprouts are in particularly high demand during the holidays because they're used in hangover soups. Hangovers are caused by the accumulation of acetaldehyde, a byproduct of the liver when it breaks down alcohol. Bean sprouts contain an amino acid called asparagine, which helps the body combat hangovers.

[Soundbite] "Prof. Im Gyeong-suk (University of Suwon): Asparagine can be found in large amounts in bean sprout roots. To relieve a hangover, try to keep the roots intact. Many people only use the tops, because they are rich in protein. But the roots should also be used. "

Pesticide-free and organic bean sprouts are also easy to find in stores these days. Many families grow bean sprouts at home because it's very easy.

[Soundbite] Sin Jeong-hwa (Homemaker): "I heard that genetically modified beans are grown by using growth accelerators and pesticides. But I don't have to worry about that. They're easier to grow than I thought. It's amazing and it's fun to watch them grow."

To grow bean sprouts at home you need a vessel with holes built in for drainage. Wash the beans and soak them in water for four to five hours. If you leave them to soak for too long, the sprouts may become too weak. It's also important to block out the light. Watering your bean sprouts often is essential to making sure they grow. If the water is too warm, your bean sprouts may grow quickly, but they'll also be at risk of rotting. It's best to use lukewarm water five or six times a day. In just a week they'll be ready to eat. To prevent odor, be sure to change the water frequently.

[Soundbite] Prof. Im Gyeong-suk (University of Suwon): "Beans don’t have vitamin C at all. But as bean sprouts grow, they acquire vitamin C through biosynthesis. They're also rich in pectin, hemicellulose and other food fiber. Bean sprouts provide all the nutrients that modern-day people need."

Do not add dried pepper powder to the hangover soup. Just season it with some salt.

[Soundbite] "Bean sprouts are rich in bean protein, which improves digestion, as well as essential fatty acids such as linolenic acid and alpha linolenic acid, and calcium, which is essential for healthy bones. That's why bean sprouts help promote growth in children and prevent osteoporosis in women. They also help prevent aging, as they're rich in food fiber, and improve the function of the large intestine thus preventing constipation."

Bean sprouts are an essential part of any Korean's winter diet, as they help relieve hangovers and keep colds at bay.
  • Tight Spender
    • 입력 2014-01-06 15:49:06
    • 수정2014-01-06 15:53:35
    News Today
[Anchor Lead]

A surprising report shows that the South Korean government spends the least on social security among OECD member countries, just 13 percent of national funds. What does this mean for Korea’s aging society?

[Pkg]

As of 2011, the South Korean government spent 13.1 percent of the national funds on social security. That's the lowest rate among the member-countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. Denmark, Germany and Finland spent more than 43 percent of their funds on social security, while Japan spent 42.7 percent. In contrast, Korea spent the largest portion of its funds on improving the economy, which is 20.1 percent. Furthermore, over 15 percent of the government's funding went towards education, health care and public services respectively, while 8.6 percent went to national defense. The OECD member-nations were found to have spent an average of 35.6 percent on social security, 14.5 percent on health care, 13.6 on public services and 12.5 on education. Also, in 2012, the South Korean government's credibility level was 23 percent, the lowest ranking. The percentage of female government ministers in Korea was also the lowest - at 11.1 percent, which contrasts sharply with the OECD average of 24.9 percent. Meanwhile, the public's satisfaction with health care services was found to be the highest - at 68 percent.

2. Power Conflict

[Anchor Lead]

A new set of damage compensation laws aim to resolve conflicts between power authorities and those living near transmission lines. Residents say the compensation doesn’t go far enough.

[Pkg]

This is the home and stable of the 71-year-old Yu Han-suk who had committed suicide in December. Reportedly, Yu was greatly disappointed that she could not receive damage compensation, just because her home was 350 meters away from a power transmission line, 170 meters farther than the range eligible for direct payment.

[Soundbite] Yu Dong-hwan (Beavered Family): "There was a failure to implant the pig embryos during the fertilization process, which means we can’t raise pigs."

According to the newly legislated laws, cash payments are made to the land located within 33 meters on both sides of the power lines and to homes within 180 meters, but those within one kilometer are only eligible for indirect compensations. Residents balk at these new criteria, claiming that only a handful of people will stand to receive direct compensations.

[Soundbite] Baek Yeong-min (Member, Protest Committee): "No farmland is included within the 33-meter limit. The government-set price for forest land is between 20% and 25%, which amounts to only a few thousand dollars."

But the Korea Electric Power Corporation argues that the areas that fall under the compensation standards have increased up to 10 times from the previous level and that the residents living around power lines nationwide would stand to receive about 94.8 million dollars in additional redress.

[Soundbite] Jeong Du-ok (Korea Electric Power Corporation Official): "We plan to follow the law on compensating for the homes within a certain distance from the power lines."

The public is urging the authorities to come up with follow-up measures in order to appease the residents' ongoing protests.

3. Political Preparation

[Anchor Lead]

Politicians are already trying to get an edge in upcoming local elections. Independent lawmaker Ahn Cheol-soo is stepping into the fray with his own political party to compete with the Saenuri and Democratic Parties.

[Pkg]

Independent lawmaker Ahn Cheol-soo has again joined hands with former Environment Minister Yoon Yeo-joon. Yoon split from Ahn whom he had once mentored, but is now invited back to co-chair the steering committee for the establishment of a new party.

[Soundbite] Ahn Cheol-soo (Independent Lawmaker): "Experience and wisdom are the most important. He strongly believes that rational reforms are necessary."

The ruling Saenuri Party criticized Yoon's actions as flip-flopping and the opposition Democratic Party said that his political identity was vague. Four-time Saenuri representative Won Yoo-chul was the first one to announce his candidacy for governor of Gyeonggi Province. The party leadership is urging more experienced politicians, such as Chung Mong-joon, to consider running for other posts to boost the party's chances of winning.

[Soundbite] Rep. Hong Moon-jong (Saenuri Party): "I hope he can put his personal political plans aside and accept the party's requests."

From the Democratic Party another fourth-term representative, Won Hye-young, has joined the Gyeonggi gubernatorial race. The Democratic Party leaders are looking for a strong candidate who can win in the Honam region, against the Ahn Cheol-soo party that is overwhelmingly popular.

[Soundbite] Rep. Jun Byung-hun (Democratic Party): "I hope the local elections of 2014 will become a competition of policies, visions, and political figures."

Also, the Saenuri Party is pushing for the abolishment of district councils and reduction of consecutive terms allowed for mayors of major cities, while the Democratic Party is opposing the shutdown of district councils.

4. Social Enterprises

[Anchor Lead]

Social enterprises include companies that either hire the socially underprivileged or provide services to them. Here’s a closer look at some of these organizations and the work they’re doing.

[Pkg]

This man was seriously injured seven years ago in a car accident, which caused him to be severely disabled. He has been dealing with strong social bias ever since.

[Soundbite] Gang Seong-jin (Brain Disorder Level III): "When I had job interviews they would tell me that my physical condition was not suitable for work."

Kang was able to land a job at a small social enterprise that produces eco-friendly stationery products. Fourteen out of its 19 employees either have some form of a disability or a big gap in their employment history.

[Soundbite] Kim Jun-ho (CEO, Simwon Tech): "We solve social problems that regular companies can’t through corporate activity."

Hiring people with disabilities is not the only precondition to gain employment at a social enterprise. This theater company was designated as an exemplary social enterprise last year. Most of its 180 employees are students. They dedicate their efforts to protecting the environment and eradicating school violence. The students teach acting skills and help aspiring actors to make their debuts. For nine years, they have been providing education services and staging performances for socially marginalized people.

[Soundbite] U Seung-ju (Head, Theater Company “Flying Car”): "We consider educating people free of charge and putting on their show to be our greatest service."

Thanks to social enterprises, the underprivileged and physically challenged can benefit in many ways, whether by finding jobs and or getting a chance to grow.

5. Poised for Gold

[Anchor Lead]

In a rehearsal for next month’s Winter Olympic Games in Sochi, Russia, figure skating champion Kim Yuna won South Korea’s national championship.

[Pkg]

The queen of figure skating stages an enrapturing performance to "Adios Nonino." Donning a purple costume, Kim Yu-na showed off her artistic talent to the fullest and her motions impressed the jury with their vigor, while her spins were flawless. She made a mistake while performing a double axel, but her overall performance was mesmerizing enough to repay her domestic fans for their love and support. Kim Yu-na received 147.26 points in free skating. Her overall score was 227.86 points, which is just 0.7 points short of her world record.

[Soundbite] Kim Yu-na (National Figure Skater): "It felt good to compete in the final season in Korea and put on a good performance."

At the awarding ceremony, Kim performed the double axel again to express her gratitude. Kim's final rehearsal was perfect. Now she's poised to win her second Olympic gold medal in Sochi.

6. Credit Delinquency

[Anchor Lead]

Weighed down by high college tuition costs, more and more students are looking to borrow money to pay for their education. This leads to the danger of credit delinquency, a growing problem.

[Pkg]

This scholarship foundation lends money for college tuition. The foundation gets many inquiries for student loans. They are mostly from students who are not eligible for state scholarships or whose aids are not enough. This third-year student already has borrowed 19 thousand dollars so far. She is already worried about paying back the loan after her graduation.

[Soundbite] Mun Ji-eun (College Student): "It's already a problem. I'm already worried about paying back the student loan after I get a job."

In the second semester of 2013 alone, some 390 thousand students received student loans, which comes to an average of about 3,220 dollars per student. The number of credit delinquents who could not pay back the loans has also soared from 26 thousand in 2010 to 42 thousand in 2013. Some of the students who are not eligible for loans even resort to high-interest private lenders.

[Soundbite] An Dae-chan (Korea Student Aid Foundation Official): "Private lenders sometimes have very high interest rates. Be sure to avoid them and apply for government-sponsored student loans instead."

The average annual tuition for a private college stands at more than 7,000 dollars. As long as Korea's college tuition remains the second highest among OECD members, many Korean college students will continue to be deep in debt even before they start their careers.

7. Remote Control

[Anchor Lead]

With the aid of the internet, smartphones can be tapped as a remote control for just about any appliance. Here’s a look at how this technology is being applied.

[Pkg]

A man remote-controls a mini fan on his desk via his smartphone from outside the office.

[Soundbite] "Go, mini fan!"

The mini fan begins operating at his order.

[Soundbite] "Hello, light!"

He can also turn on a light from far away. Everyday home appliances can be remote-controlled if they are planted with sensors and connected to the Internet. The Korea Electronics Technology Institute developed the technology to operate smart home systems through the Internet. Various sources of technologies are open to anyone who wants to use them for developing new smart systems.

[Soundbite] Kim Jae-ho (Korea Electronics Technology Institute): "They can be a basis for business start-ups and small companies to quickly turn their bright, creative ideas into good business models."

For example, a small Korean company developed a smart flower pot that provides the proper levels of light and water to plants by measuring room temperature and humidity. The U.S., Japanese and Chinese governments have begun supporting companies to develop technologies that use these revolutionary means. The Korean government is also set to provide full support to the development of similar smart technologies.

8. Warm Reception

[Anchor Lead]

Korea’s unique underfloor heating system, known as “ondol,” has been the best way to keep warm on the Peninsula for hundreds of years. Now this style of heating is gaining popularity in China.

[Pkg]

Apartments are under construction in Xian, China. The apartments have the Korean-style heating system known as "ondol." Under the floor, there are pipes that circulate hot water, causing the home to warm up. The Korean-type heating system is warmer and more energy-efficient than radiators that are commonly used in Chinese apartments. So the Korean-style heating system is gaining popularity in China. Houses using the ondol heating system are only about 20 percent more expensive than those that are heated by radiators. The Korean-style heating system was installed in some 100-thousand Chinese apartments in 2012 alone. Korean heating system companies are establishing regional offices and factories in China to cash in on the new business boom. A Korean heating system firm entered the Chinese market in 2000. Its sales have grown 30 times over the past 12 years.

[Soundbite] Kim Byeong-gon (Head, Kiturami Boiler China Corporation): "We’ve been working to promote the merits of the ondol heating system in China. The Chinese are seeing the Korean heating system positively, resulting a growth in our sales."

Ondol is the latest hit that Korea has exported to China.

9. Sprouts & Health

[Anchor Lead]

Bean sprouts are an important part of the Korean diet, widely believed to be one of the best cures for a hangover. They're not so popular in other Asian cuisines, but they are considered essential here.

[Pkg]

Homemakers are out shopping for their groceries. Many of them buy tofu and bean sprouts. These two ingredients alone make up almost half their dinner menu. Bean sprouts are in particularly high demand during the holidays because they're used in hangover soups. Hangovers are caused by the accumulation of acetaldehyde, a byproduct of the liver when it breaks down alcohol. Bean sprouts contain an amino acid called asparagine, which helps the body combat hangovers.

[Soundbite] "Prof. Im Gyeong-suk (University of Suwon): Asparagine can be found in large amounts in bean sprout roots. To relieve a hangover, try to keep the roots intact. Many people only use the tops, because they are rich in protein. But the roots should also be used. "

Pesticide-free and organic bean sprouts are also easy to find in stores these days. Many families grow bean sprouts at home because it's very easy.

[Soundbite] Sin Jeong-hwa (Homemaker): "I heard that genetically modified beans are grown by using growth accelerators and pesticides. But I don't have to worry about that. They're easier to grow than I thought. It's amazing and it's fun to watch them grow."

To grow bean sprouts at home you need a vessel with holes built in for drainage. Wash the beans and soak them in water for four to five hours. If you leave them to soak for too long, the sprouts may become too weak. It's also important to block out the light. Watering your bean sprouts often is essential to making sure they grow. If the water is too warm, your bean sprouts may grow quickly, but they'll also be at risk of rotting. It's best to use lukewarm water five or six times a day. In just a week they'll be ready to eat. To prevent odor, be sure to change the water frequently.

[Soundbite] Prof. Im Gyeong-suk (University of Suwon): "Beans don’t have vitamin C at all. But as bean sprouts grow, they acquire vitamin C through biosynthesis. They're also rich in pectin, hemicellulose and other food fiber. Bean sprouts provide all the nutrients that modern-day people need."

Do not add dried pepper powder to the hangover soup. Just season it with some salt.

[Soundbite] "Bean sprouts are rich in bean protein, which improves digestion, as well as essential fatty acids such as linolenic acid and alpha linolenic acid, and calcium, which is essential for healthy bones. That's why bean sprouts help promote growth in children and prevent osteoporosis in women. They also help prevent aging, as they're rich in food fiber, and improve the function of the large intestine thus preventing constipation."

Bean sprouts are an essential part of any Korean's winter diet, as they help relieve hangovers and keep colds at bay.
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