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NK Missile Launch
입력 2014.03.04 (15:53) 수정 2014.03.04 (16:17) News Today
자동재생
동영상영역 시작
동영상영역 끝
[Anchor Lead]

North Korea fired two short-range ballistic missiles from the eastcoast again on Monday following launches last week. This time, the missiles arebelieved to have reached as far as Japan’s Air Defense Identification Zone.

[Pkg]

The missiles North Korea fired Monday crossed over North Korean waters and reached the open sea.They're believed to be Scud-C missiles with a longer range than the Scud-B the North fired last Thursday.The missiles fired at 6:19 a.m. Monday in Wonsan soared as high as 130 kilometers and traveled more than 500.They're believed to have fallen within Japan's Air Defense Identification Zone.But North Korea did not declare a travel ban warning fishing vessels and civilian aircraft to evacuate the area.

[Soundbite] KIM MIN-SEOK (Spokesman, Ministry of National Defense): "The North's abnormal military action is a provocationseriously threatening the global navigation order and the safety of civilians."

The South Korean government believes the ballistic missile launch violates UN Security Council resolutions and is reviewing response measures.But the North's provocative protests using military power are expected to continue for the time being.North Korean media on Monday broadcast North Korean leader Kim Jong-un inspecting a missile parts factory.

[Soundbite] Prof. KIM YONG-HYEON (Dongguk University): "North Korea is gradually raising its low-key militaryprotest toward the U.S. and the world in response to the South Korea-U.S. Key Resolve exercise."

Meanwhile in South Korea, the USS Columbus and the U.S. 7th Fleet command ship the USS Blue Ridge arrived at Busan Port Monday for joint defense drills.How North Korea will react to this is drawing attention.

2. Red Cross Talks

[Anchor Lead]

Red Cross talks are back on between North Korea and Japan, withforeign ministry officials of both sides attending. Representatives agreed tocontinue dialogue on the return of the remains of Japanese nationals buried inNorth Korea.

[Pkg]

Red Cross officials from North Korea and Japan sat down at the negotiating table for the first time in one year and seven months.It's the first Red Cross meeting between the two sides since Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe took office.Topping the agenda was the issue of returning the remains of an estimated 20-thousand Japanese who died in North Korea during World War Two. The officials also discussed whether to allow Japanese families to visit grave sites in North Korea.

[Soundbite] RI HO-RIM (Secretary-General, NK Red Cross): "We’ve agreed that it's necessary for the talks to continueto resolve the issue of Japanese people's remains."

Japan also thanked North Korea for its one million dollar aid following the deadly earthquake in eastern Japan in 2011.Foreign ministry officials from both sides also attended the meeting, drawing attention to whether the talks will contribute to resolving the issue of Japanese abductees in the North and the normalization of bilateral relations.Just like the previous Red Cross talks held in Beijing in 2012, this meeting could also lead to formal government-level talks between Tokyo and Pyongyang.

[Soundbite] OSAMU TASAKA (Int’l Dept. Director, Japanese Red Cross): "Both sides affirmed the need to continue dialoguethrough Red Cross officials and government representatives."

The two countries may also use the Red Cross talks to avert international isolation.

3. Falsified Records

[Anchor Lead]

It’s been revealed that Japan falsified the deaths of Koreansconscripted to hard labor during Japanese colonial control of Korea, andsecretly enshrined their names at Yasukuni Shrine. The families here in Koreaare outraged.

[Pkg]

Yasukuni Shrine in Tokyo is where Japan commemorated class A war criminals from World War II.But it was found that the memorial plate for Korean laborer Park Chun-ha is also kept there. Park had been conscripted to Japan for hard labor in 1944, but had returned to Korea after 15 years.He died in Korea from an illness back in 1980, but Japanese authorities had already processed him as war dead in 1959 and enshrined him in Yasukuni Shrine.

[Soundbite] PARK MYEONG-JA (Late Park Chun-ha’s Daughter): "My father is buried in our family plot. I'm stunned.It would make me feel better if only his name plate weren't in Yasukuni Shrine."

Amazingly, 32 Korean nationals, who were mobilized to work in Japan, had their deaths falsified and names kept in Yasukuni Shrine even after they had returned home alive like Mr. Park. This unthinkable incident was confirmed by the commission investigating the Japanese colonial government's compulsory mobilization. The commission had analyzed a Korean magazine published by former Korean forced laborers imprisoned as POWs in an American military base in Hawaii.The investigators found that the Japanese government had falsified the deaths of Koreans who were sent to the South Pacific and set them up in the shrine in 1959. Their paperwork presented them as war dead. It was Japan that presented them as war dead with the paperwork.

[Soundbite] JEONG HYE-GYEONG (Enforced Mobilization Investigation Committee): "When we analyze all 2,500 forced laborers, we'relikely to discover more cases of falsified death reports of Koreans who were still alive."

The Korean government plans to conduct more detailed probes to refute Japan's historical distortions.

4. Quarantine Questions

[Anchor Lead]

Avian flu has broken out at the National Institute of AnimalScience, the heart of Korea’s livestock research. The outbreak has causedserious concern over the effectiveness of the AI quarantine system.

[Pkg]

The entrance to theNational Institute of Animal Science is firmly closed.Outside personnel hasbeen banned from entering the research compound since avian flu broke out in North Jeolla Province in mid-January. But it wasn’t enough to contain thevirus.The institute has reported that 30 ducks raised there were found dead during an inspection.The dead birds were found to have avian the H5N8 strain of flu virus.The institute is located within three kilometers of the AI epicenter. Around 15 thousand hens and ducks had to be culled and buried, and restoration is expected to take two years.

[Soundbite]

SONG YONG-SEOP (Nat’l Inst. of Animal Science Official) : "It takes about 95 weeks to raise breeding chickensand marketable ones. So it would take two years to normalize the poultry stock."

Since the outbreak of avian influenza in January, only researchers had been allowed into the poultry farm and the birds were given feed produced atthe institute.The outbreak of avian flu at the institute demonstrates that the government’s efforts to stop the spread of AI have been of little help.

5. Organ Donations

[Anchor Lead]

Late Cardinal Kim Sou-hwan donated his corneas when he died in2009, raising social awareness on posthumous organ donation in Korea. Applicantnumbers have topped one million, but there is still a need for more.

[Pkg]

The late Kim Nam-baek, chief of the Donghae Fire Station in the east coast, died from overworking himself this January.His eyes were donated according to his will and two patients on the verge of turning blind gained eyesight.

[Soundbite] Prof. HAN GYEONG-EUN (Chuncheon Sacred Heart Hospital): "He wanted to donate his corneas upon his deathand his family also upheld his wish."

The number of people pledging to donate their organs posthumously has surpassed one million nationwide.Meanwhile there were 26-thousand patients waiting for organ transplants as of late last year.But 17-hundred transplant operations actually take place every year accounting for less than seven percent of total patients.

[Soundbite] JEONG JAE-IL (Waiting Recipient): "I was on the waiting list for five yearsbut still there aren't many donors."

Koreans' traditional preference of burial is the biggest obstacle to spreading the organ donation culture.

[Soundbite] CHAE SU-SEOK (Gangwon Branch Head, Korean Organ Donor Program): "For example in the United States, January 1st celebratesthe Rose Parade to recognize gratitude for organ donors."

There are an average 8.4 brain dead organ donors per one million Koreans. This is far lower than 35 in Spain and 25 in the U.S.

6. Huge Investment

[Anchor Lead]

South Korean petroleum company S-Oil is investing nearly 7.5billion U.S. dollars to develop an industrial complex in Ulsan, southeasternKorea. The venture is being applauded as a win-win collaboration between theprivate and public sector.

[Pkg]

This is the site that S-Oil bought from the Korea National Oil Corporation for 476 million U.S. dollars to build an oil storage base. It measures 92 hectares. S-Oil plans to investalmost 4.6 billion dollars to build oil refinery facilities here by 2017, and an additional 2.8 billion dollars later.

[Soundbite] PARK BONG-SU (Vice President, S-Oil Corp.): "We plan to build oil refining and petrochemicalproduction facilities to produce high-profit products."

S-Oil expects the newplant to add two and a half billion dollars to its annual exports and create 3,200 full-time jobs.The Korea National OilCorporation is expected to benefit from the deal as well, as it can use themoney to replace old oil reserve tanks with a new underground storage system.The Korean governmentsays the Korea National Oil Corporation’s recent land saledemonstrates the government’s efforts to encourage corporate investment.Starting this month, S-Oiland the corporation will demolish the old storage tank and build a new oneunderground, and start the construction of an oil refinery in the second halfof the year.

7. Golden Pig Children

[Anchor Lead]

In Korea, births surged in 2007, the year of the golden pig thanksto superstitions that said being born that year would lead to prosperity. Thegolden pigs became first graders on Monday.

[Pkg]

This urban elementary school is in process of changing its music and art rooms into classrooms to accommodate the incoming class.Classrooms are insufficient, since the number of first graders has increased 15 percent this year with the baby boom seven years ago.

[Soundbite] SIN IN-JA (Principal, Elementary School): "We are busy making preparations toaccommodate the incoming classes."

However, the situation is quite the opposite in the primary schools in rural areas.This elementary school accepted no new student this year for the first time in its 71-year history.

[Soundbite] JEON SUN-EOP (Deputy Principal, Elementary School): "We have good education programs and curriculum.However, we don't have the opportunity to run them."

Seventy-one elementary schools across the nation accepted no or only one new student this year.Last year, 25-point-seven percent of the nation's elementary schools accepted ten new students or fewer. Most of the schools are in rural areas.They still have problems even if new students enter school.

[Soundbite] "Raise your hands, first graders!Second graders?"

The insufficient number of students forces the school to teach students of different grades in one classroom. With the mix-up classes, the school is no longer functioning as a good educational institution.

[Soundbite] KIM MI-HUI (Teacher, Elementary School): "Teachers cannot teach students social skills andempathy that they learn in peer groups."

Rural schools remain in a deep trouble despite the Golden Pig baby boom.

8. Last Chance

[Anchor Lead]

Korea’s national soccer team is in Greece for an evaluation match.Training has begun, and striker Park Chu-young has joined the squad after adisappointing performance in the European league.

[Pkg]

The Korean national soccer team has held its first training session after arriving in Greece.Striker Park Chu-young is back with the team.The training lasted one hour despite the heavy rain.Park looked upbeat during the practice.He re-joined the national team about a year after he left it.Park's performance will determine if he can remain on the team when it competes in the Brazil World Cup.

[Soundbite] PARK CHU-YOUNG (National Football Player): "This is my last chance before the World Cup,so I do feel some pressure to score goals.But I want to focus more on working togetherwith my teammates."

To Park Chu-young the match with Greece is a crucial opportunity to show off his skills.

9. Steamed Bun Tour

[Anchor Lead]

As winter wraps up, you might expectone of the season's most popular foods "jjinbbang" to disappear.However, there are so many new shapes and varieties that this winter treat isenjoyed all year round.

[Pkg]

The steamed bun is a leading Korean snack in the winter season. These days the shapes and types available vary a great deal. But the fluffy white steamed bun is deemed the true original. Jjinbbang was born in China as red bean paste replaced the beef and veggies that typically went into dumplings. In Korea, steamed bun grew more popular as flour became more available after the Korean War. It was considered the best snack in the poor, hungry days of Korea. Here is a steamed bun alley in Daegu city where nine jjinbbang stores are gathered. The start of it all is this particular store. The red bean paste is piled up in a mountain. The fillings here are so generous, two to three times that of elsewhere, which explains the mountain of paste filling.

[Soundbite] PARK JI-YEONG (Vendor): "More red bean paste goes in than flour to a ratioof six to four. People like it this way."

The bun is first steamed lightly and then recooked just before serving.

[Soundbite] "Wow, look at the beans. There'sso much of it. It looks so good."

There are many varieties of steamed bun nationwide. Here in Jinju, South Gyeongsang Province, the jjinbbang contains not only the solid paste but also the thick juicy sap of the red beans. It looks mouth-watering, doesn't it? Tangerine goes into the steamed buns made in Jeju Island. The orange adds to the chewy texture. Steamed bun infused with tangerine jam is said to be especially popular. Steamed bun with grated elm roots is known to be enjoyed only on holidays and special days in North Korea. This treat can also be enjoyed in South Korea hand-made by North Korean defectors. Now we visit a steamed bun village in Wonju, a renowned tourist site. There must be a reason to come all the way to Gangwon Province for jjinbbang. The buns come in beautiful colors such as of pumpkin and mugwort. There's also a secret to the savory taste.

[Soundbite] "This is rice four."

Rice powder is used instead of flour.

[Soundbite] HA MUN-HO (Vendor): "We make the bun with rice flour in the traditionalway like our grandmothers and mothers did it.Makgeolli goes in for natural fermentation."

The rice dough kneaded with the rice wine makgeolli is fermented for eight hours. This is to maximize the chewiness of the bun as rice is more challenging in fermentation. Hwangdun steamed bun is more of a health food as its filled with various sweet potato and pea pastes, not to mention its chewy skin. If you're curious about the recipe, you can apply for a class. Students love learning how to make the bun. The boys are clumsy but they give it their best shaping the dough. The hwangdun steamed bun is done. The smell is amazing.

[Soundbite] "Do you think you formed the prettiest shape?"

[Soundbite] "(Yes, the bun burst open but it's delicious.) Locally bought buns are great but what about making some yourself with mulberries purchased in Buan."

[Soundbite] KIM OE-SUN (Culinary Expert): "You can make tasty steamed buns in the comfortof your home. Today I'll use mulberries."

This is how to make mulberry streamed buns that taste as good as they look. Prepare the dough with flour, milk, grape seed oil, salt and mulberry syrup for the reddish color. After kneading the dough, wrap it with vinyl and wait until it expands to twice the volume. The filling is made with boiled sweet potato and mulberries. Put in the paste and form the bun. Cook it up for ten minutes and voila, the violet hue jjinbbang is ready to go. Mulberry steamed bun is a wonderful snack for adults and children alike. Did you enjoy our cross country tour of steamed buns? The winter cold will soon be no more but remember that streamed buns are available year round.
  • NK Missile Launch
    • 입력 2014-03-04 15:28:36
    • 수정2014-03-04 16:17:55
    News Today
[Anchor Lead]

North Korea fired two short-range ballistic missiles from the eastcoast again on Monday following launches last week. This time, the missiles arebelieved to have reached as far as Japan’s Air Defense Identification Zone.

[Pkg]

The missiles North Korea fired Monday crossed over North Korean waters and reached the open sea.They're believed to be Scud-C missiles with a longer range than the Scud-B the North fired last Thursday.The missiles fired at 6:19 a.m. Monday in Wonsan soared as high as 130 kilometers and traveled more than 500.They're believed to have fallen within Japan's Air Defense Identification Zone.But North Korea did not declare a travel ban warning fishing vessels and civilian aircraft to evacuate the area.

[Soundbite] KIM MIN-SEOK (Spokesman, Ministry of National Defense): "The North's abnormal military action is a provocationseriously threatening the global navigation order and the safety of civilians."

The South Korean government believes the ballistic missile launch violates UN Security Council resolutions and is reviewing response measures.But the North's provocative protests using military power are expected to continue for the time being.North Korean media on Monday broadcast North Korean leader Kim Jong-un inspecting a missile parts factory.

[Soundbite] Prof. KIM YONG-HYEON (Dongguk University): "North Korea is gradually raising its low-key militaryprotest toward the U.S. and the world in response to the South Korea-U.S. Key Resolve exercise."

Meanwhile in South Korea, the USS Columbus and the U.S. 7th Fleet command ship the USS Blue Ridge arrived at Busan Port Monday for joint defense drills.How North Korea will react to this is drawing attention.

2. Red Cross Talks

[Anchor Lead]

Red Cross talks are back on between North Korea and Japan, withforeign ministry officials of both sides attending. Representatives agreed tocontinue dialogue on the return of the remains of Japanese nationals buried inNorth Korea.

[Pkg]

Red Cross officials from North Korea and Japan sat down at the negotiating table for the first time in one year and seven months.It's the first Red Cross meeting between the two sides since Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe took office.Topping the agenda was the issue of returning the remains of an estimated 20-thousand Japanese who died in North Korea during World War Two. The officials also discussed whether to allow Japanese families to visit grave sites in North Korea.

[Soundbite] RI HO-RIM (Secretary-General, NK Red Cross): "We’ve agreed that it's necessary for the talks to continueto resolve the issue of Japanese people's remains."

Japan also thanked North Korea for its one million dollar aid following the deadly earthquake in eastern Japan in 2011.Foreign ministry officials from both sides also attended the meeting, drawing attention to whether the talks will contribute to resolving the issue of Japanese abductees in the North and the normalization of bilateral relations.Just like the previous Red Cross talks held in Beijing in 2012, this meeting could also lead to formal government-level talks between Tokyo and Pyongyang.

[Soundbite] OSAMU TASAKA (Int’l Dept. Director, Japanese Red Cross): "Both sides affirmed the need to continue dialoguethrough Red Cross officials and government representatives."

The two countries may also use the Red Cross talks to avert international isolation.

3. Falsified Records

[Anchor Lead]

It’s been revealed that Japan falsified the deaths of Koreansconscripted to hard labor during Japanese colonial control of Korea, andsecretly enshrined their names at Yasukuni Shrine. The families here in Koreaare outraged.

[Pkg]

Yasukuni Shrine in Tokyo is where Japan commemorated class A war criminals from World War II.But it was found that the memorial plate for Korean laborer Park Chun-ha is also kept there. Park had been conscripted to Japan for hard labor in 1944, but had returned to Korea after 15 years.He died in Korea from an illness back in 1980, but Japanese authorities had already processed him as war dead in 1959 and enshrined him in Yasukuni Shrine.

[Soundbite] PARK MYEONG-JA (Late Park Chun-ha’s Daughter): "My father is buried in our family plot. I'm stunned.It would make me feel better if only his name plate weren't in Yasukuni Shrine."

Amazingly, 32 Korean nationals, who were mobilized to work in Japan, had their deaths falsified and names kept in Yasukuni Shrine even after they had returned home alive like Mr. Park. This unthinkable incident was confirmed by the commission investigating the Japanese colonial government's compulsory mobilization. The commission had analyzed a Korean magazine published by former Korean forced laborers imprisoned as POWs in an American military base in Hawaii.The investigators found that the Japanese government had falsified the deaths of Koreans who were sent to the South Pacific and set them up in the shrine in 1959. Their paperwork presented them as war dead. It was Japan that presented them as war dead with the paperwork.

[Soundbite] JEONG HYE-GYEONG (Enforced Mobilization Investigation Committee): "When we analyze all 2,500 forced laborers, we'relikely to discover more cases of falsified death reports of Koreans who were still alive."

The Korean government plans to conduct more detailed probes to refute Japan's historical distortions.

4. Quarantine Questions

[Anchor Lead]

Avian flu has broken out at the National Institute of AnimalScience, the heart of Korea’s livestock research. The outbreak has causedserious concern over the effectiveness of the AI quarantine system.

[Pkg]

The entrance to theNational Institute of Animal Science is firmly closed.Outside personnel hasbeen banned from entering the research compound since avian flu broke out in North Jeolla Province in mid-January. But it wasn’t enough to contain thevirus.The institute has reported that 30 ducks raised there were found dead during an inspection.The dead birds were found to have avian the H5N8 strain of flu virus.The institute is located within three kilometers of the AI epicenter. Around 15 thousand hens and ducks had to be culled and buried, and restoration is expected to take two years.

[Soundbite]

SONG YONG-SEOP (Nat’l Inst. of Animal Science Official) : "It takes about 95 weeks to raise breeding chickensand marketable ones. So it would take two years to normalize the poultry stock."

Since the outbreak of avian influenza in January, only researchers had been allowed into the poultry farm and the birds were given feed produced atthe institute.The outbreak of avian flu at the institute demonstrates that the government’s efforts to stop the spread of AI have been of little help.

5. Organ Donations

[Anchor Lead]

Late Cardinal Kim Sou-hwan donated his corneas when he died in2009, raising social awareness on posthumous organ donation in Korea. Applicantnumbers have topped one million, but there is still a need for more.

[Pkg]

The late Kim Nam-baek, chief of the Donghae Fire Station in the east coast, died from overworking himself this January.His eyes were donated according to his will and two patients on the verge of turning blind gained eyesight.

[Soundbite] Prof. HAN GYEONG-EUN (Chuncheon Sacred Heart Hospital): "He wanted to donate his corneas upon his deathand his family also upheld his wish."

The number of people pledging to donate their organs posthumously has surpassed one million nationwide.Meanwhile there were 26-thousand patients waiting for organ transplants as of late last year.But 17-hundred transplant operations actually take place every year accounting for less than seven percent of total patients.

[Soundbite] JEONG JAE-IL (Waiting Recipient): "I was on the waiting list for five yearsbut still there aren't many donors."

Koreans' traditional preference of burial is the biggest obstacle to spreading the organ donation culture.

[Soundbite] CHAE SU-SEOK (Gangwon Branch Head, Korean Organ Donor Program): "For example in the United States, January 1st celebratesthe Rose Parade to recognize gratitude for organ donors."

There are an average 8.4 brain dead organ donors per one million Koreans. This is far lower than 35 in Spain and 25 in the U.S.

6. Huge Investment

[Anchor Lead]

South Korean petroleum company S-Oil is investing nearly 7.5billion U.S. dollars to develop an industrial complex in Ulsan, southeasternKorea. The venture is being applauded as a win-win collaboration between theprivate and public sector.

[Pkg]

This is the site that S-Oil bought from the Korea National Oil Corporation for 476 million U.S. dollars to build an oil storage base. It measures 92 hectares. S-Oil plans to investalmost 4.6 billion dollars to build oil refinery facilities here by 2017, and an additional 2.8 billion dollars later.

[Soundbite] PARK BONG-SU (Vice President, S-Oil Corp.): "We plan to build oil refining and petrochemicalproduction facilities to produce high-profit products."

S-Oil expects the newplant to add two and a half billion dollars to its annual exports and create 3,200 full-time jobs.The Korea National OilCorporation is expected to benefit from the deal as well, as it can use themoney to replace old oil reserve tanks with a new underground storage system.The Korean governmentsays the Korea National Oil Corporation’s recent land saledemonstrates the government’s efforts to encourage corporate investment.Starting this month, S-Oiland the corporation will demolish the old storage tank and build a new oneunderground, and start the construction of an oil refinery in the second halfof the year.

7. Golden Pig Children

[Anchor Lead]

In Korea, births surged in 2007, the year of the golden pig thanksto superstitions that said being born that year would lead to prosperity. Thegolden pigs became first graders on Monday.

[Pkg]

This urban elementary school is in process of changing its music and art rooms into classrooms to accommodate the incoming class.Classrooms are insufficient, since the number of first graders has increased 15 percent this year with the baby boom seven years ago.

[Soundbite] SIN IN-JA (Principal, Elementary School): "We are busy making preparations toaccommodate the incoming classes."

However, the situation is quite the opposite in the primary schools in rural areas.This elementary school accepted no new student this year for the first time in its 71-year history.

[Soundbite] JEON SUN-EOP (Deputy Principal, Elementary School): "We have good education programs and curriculum.However, we don't have the opportunity to run them."

Seventy-one elementary schools across the nation accepted no or only one new student this year.Last year, 25-point-seven percent of the nation's elementary schools accepted ten new students or fewer. Most of the schools are in rural areas.They still have problems even if new students enter school.

[Soundbite] "Raise your hands, first graders!Second graders?"

The insufficient number of students forces the school to teach students of different grades in one classroom. With the mix-up classes, the school is no longer functioning as a good educational institution.

[Soundbite] KIM MI-HUI (Teacher, Elementary School): "Teachers cannot teach students social skills andempathy that they learn in peer groups."

Rural schools remain in a deep trouble despite the Golden Pig baby boom.

8. Last Chance

[Anchor Lead]

Korea’s national soccer team is in Greece for an evaluation match.Training has begun, and striker Park Chu-young has joined the squad after adisappointing performance in the European league.

[Pkg]

The Korean national soccer team has held its first training session after arriving in Greece.Striker Park Chu-young is back with the team.The training lasted one hour despite the heavy rain.Park looked upbeat during the practice.He re-joined the national team about a year after he left it.Park's performance will determine if he can remain on the team when it competes in the Brazil World Cup.

[Soundbite] PARK CHU-YOUNG (National Football Player): "This is my last chance before the World Cup,so I do feel some pressure to score goals.But I want to focus more on working togetherwith my teammates."

To Park Chu-young the match with Greece is a crucial opportunity to show off his skills.

9. Steamed Bun Tour

[Anchor Lead]

As winter wraps up, you might expectone of the season's most popular foods "jjinbbang" to disappear.However, there are so many new shapes and varieties that this winter treat isenjoyed all year round.

[Pkg]

The steamed bun is a leading Korean snack in the winter season. These days the shapes and types available vary a great deal. But the fluffy white steamed bun is deemed the true original. Jjinbbang was born in China as red bean paste replaced the beef and veggies that typically went into dumplings. In Korea, steamed bun grew more popular as flour became more available after the Korean War. It was considered the best snack in the poor, hungry days of Korea. Here is a steamed bun alley in Daegu city where nine jjinbbang stores are gathered. The start of it all is this particular store. The red bean paste is piled up in a mountain. The fillings here are so generous, two to three times that of elsewhere, which explains the mountain of paste filling.

[Soundbite] PARK JI-YEONG (Vendor): "More red bean paste goes in than flour to a ratioof six to four. People like it this way."

The bun is first steamed lightly and then recooked just before serving.

[Soundbite] "Wow, look at the beans. There'sso much of it. It looks so good."

There are many varieties of steamed bun nationwide. Here in Jinju, South Gyeongsang Province, the jjinbbang contains not only the solid paste but also the thick juicy sap of the red beans. It looks mouth-watering, doesn't it? Tangerine goes into the steamed buns made in Jeju Island. The orange adds to the chewy texture. Steamed bun infused with tangerine jam is said to be especially popular. Steamed bun with grated elm roots is known to be enjoyed only on holidays and special days in North Korea. This treat can also be enjoyed in South Korea hand-made by North Korean defectors. Now we visit a steamed bun village in Wonju, a renowned tourist site. There must be a reason to come all the way to Gangwon Province for jjinbbang. The buns come in beautiful colors such as of pumpkin and mugwort. There's also a secret to the savory taste.

[Soundbite] "This is rice four."

Rice powder is used instead of flour.

[Soundbite] HA MUN-HO (Vendor): "We make the bun with rice flour in the traditionalway like our grandmothers and mothers did it.Makgeolli goes in for natural fermentation."

The rice dough kneaded with the rice wine makgeolli is fermented for eight hours. This is to maximize the chewiness of the bun as rice is more challenging in fermentation. Hwangdun steamed bun is more of a health food as its filled with various sweet potato and pea pastes, not to mention its chewy skin. If you're curious about the recipe, you can apply for a class. Students love learning how to make the bun. The boys are clumsy but they give it their best shaping the dough. The hwangdun steamed bun is done. The smell is amazing.

[Soundbite] "Do you think you formed the prettiest shape?"

[Soundbite] "(Yes, the bun burst open but it's delicious.) Locally bought buns are great but what about making some yourself with mulberries purchased in Buan."

[Soundbite] KIM OE-SUN (Culinary Expert): "You can make tasty steamed buns in the comfortof your home. Today I'll use mulberries."

This is how to make mulberry streamed buns that taste as good as they look. Prepare the dough with flour, milk, grape seed oil, salt and mulberry syrup for the reddish color. After kneading the dough, wrap it with vinyl and wait until it expands to twice the volume. The filling is made with boiled sweet potato and mulberries. Put in the paste and form the bun. Cook it up for ten minutes and voila, the violet hue jjinbbang is ready to go. Mulberry steamed bun is a wonderful snack for adults and children alike. Did you enjoy our cross country tour of steamed buns? The winter cold will soon be no more but remember that streamed buns are available year round.
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