기사 본문 영역

상세페이지

Secret Meeting
입력 2014.08.29 (14:56) 수정 2014.08.29 (15:31) News Today
자동재생
동영상영역 시작
동영상영역 끝
[Anchor Lead]

We’ve just found out that earlier this month, a U.S. government official secretly visited North Korea in a military aircraft. And the news has led many to believe that Washington and Pyongyang might be ready to sit down at a negotiating table.

[Pkg]

A Washington official arrived in North Korea on a U.S. military aircraft on August 16. Sources say the official who stayed in Pyongyang for two days and one night, met with North Korean officials. A South Korean government official says that, as always, the U.S. military notified Seoul in advance about its plans to enter North Korean airspace. This is the first visit to Pyongyang by a U.S. government official in a military aircraft in two years. The topic of discussion between Washington and Pyongyang officials remains unknown. However, their meeting has led many to assume that the two sides might be ready for reconciliation. Some say that the officials probably negotiated for the release of three Americans including Kenneth Bae, held captive in the North. Washington declined comment on the talks.

[Soundbite] JEN PSAKI (Deputy Spokeswoman, U.S. State Department) : "Are you considering private bilateral talks with North Korea? Not that I know of or have heard of."

Meanwhile, some media sources say that a high-ranking North Korean official will soon visit New York for talks with the U.S. However, many skeptics also say the possibility for more North Korea-U.S. talks is low.

2. No Cheerleading Squad

[Anchor Lead]

North Korea has officially announced it will not send a cheerleading squad to the Incheon Asian Games opening in South Korea on Sep. 19. And that’s also thrown into question the prospects of a high-level meeting between the two sides.

[Pkg]

North Korea has announced it will not send a cheering squad to the Incheon Asian Games. Son Kwang-ho, vice chairman of the North's National Olympic Committee announced the decision on Chosun Central TV. He said that Pyongyang had planned to send a large cheering squad to the games aimed at improving inter-Korean relations but decided not to as South Korea raised issues over the dispatch.

[Soundbite] SON GWANG-HO (Vice Chairman, N. Korean Olympic Committee) : "We decided not to send a cheering squad to the 17th Asian Games as South Korea raised issue over the dispatch."

Son also said that North Korean delegates who visited the South last week for the Asian Games' group draw event informed South Korean organizers and officials at the time about this decision. But controversy has been raised, as the Unification Ministry announced that during the group draw event, the two Koreas only discussed matters related to the athletes and the North mentioned nothing about the cheering squad. On July 7, North Korea issued what it called a "government statement" announcing that it will send athletes and cheerleaders to the Incheon Asian Games. But ten days later during working level talks with the South, North Korean officials walked out of negotiations regarding the issues of cost and the size of the North Korean athlete and cheering squad. With the North's announcement that it will not be sending a cheering squad, the hope of seeing the two Koreas' cheerleading teams come together for the first time in nine years will have to be postponed. The last time this happened was during the 2005 Asian Athletics Championships in Incheon.

3. Returning Home

[Anchor Lead]

During Japan’s colonial rule. more than 30,000 Koreans were forced to work in mines on a remote Russian island. Even after Korea’s independence, they were forced to stay. But the remains of 18 of them have been brought to Korea so they can rest in peace.

[Pkg]

In the 1940's, more than 30,000 Koreans were forced by the Japanese to work in mines on the Russia's Sakhalin Island. Even after Korea's independence from Japanese colonial rule, these people could not return to their home because the Soviet government blocked all access to capitalist countries. The remains of 18 Koreans who died in Sakhalin have been brought to Korea. Their families carefully hold the urns with their remains wrapped in the national flag. Um Sang-heon, who was 15 when he was separated from his father, sent a petition to the Soviet government asking them for help. Now in his 80's, Um is finally able to bring his father back to his home country.

[Soundbite] EOM SANG-HEON (Son of Sakhalin Captive) : "He's now back after 73 years. Seventy-three years. He went to Sakhalin in 1941. He was forced to go there."

Of the 30,000 Korean captives forced to move to Sakhalin, 10,000 of their graves have been located. But only 19 of them have been brought to Korea. The remains of the first victim were brought last year by the Commission on Verification and Support for the Victims of Forced Mobilization under Japanese Colonialism.

[Soundbite] PARK IN-HWAN (Chief, Commission on Verification & Support for Victims) : "This is the first time we have ever confirmed the graves, excavated the remains in the presence of their families, as well as held funeral ceremonies in the traditional Korean way. It's very meaningful."

These deceased Sakhalin Koreans have finally returned to their home country after spending seven decades in a foreign land. Their remains were laid to rest in a national cemetery in Cheonan.

4. Blue Crab Season

[Anchor Lead]

The season of blue crabs is back. A fishing ban was removed early last week, allowing crab fishermen to haul in their catches from the Yellow Sea. Here's a look at how crab catchers are enjoying the sea's bounty.

[Pkg]

About sixty kilometers out from Sinjindo Port in Taean on Korea's west coast, brightly lit crab fishing boats come into view.

[Soundbite] "Now haul it up!"

Fishermen haul up traps filled with thrashing blue crabs. Even after picking out small, younger crabs, a 40-kilogram-capacity basket fills up quickly enough.

[Soundbite] KIM SEONG-BU (Captain, Crab Catching Boat) : "The fall season cannot even be compared with the spring. The catch is much bigger in the fall."

This fall's blue crab catch from the Yellow Sea is estimated to be around twenty-thousand tons, about the same as last year's abundant haul. The crabs caught overnight are brought into the port in the early morning hours. They are packed live and can be delivered throughout Korea within the day.

[Soundbite] SEOL BONG-SEOK (Official, Large supermarket) : "This year's fall crabs are so meaty and of such high quality that more than 60% of the catch can be sold in the market."

Large supermarkets competitively offering discounts on crabs are seeing long lines of customers eager to purchase the sweet fall crabs. Koreans will be able to enjoy the delicious crabs in season, thanks to the year's abundant catch and direct delivery and sales systems.

5. Joseon Military Academy

[Anchor Lead]

Hawaii may be a favorite vacation destination for Koreans, but 100 years ago, it was the site of a Joseon-era Korean Military Academy. Newly released journals outline the details of the life and training there and what the soldiers were fighting for.

[Pkg]

The men in this photo look alert and on guard in spite of their shabby uniforms. These photos were taken of some 300 members of the Korean Military Academy who gathered in Hawaii one hundred years ago, to fight for Korean independence from colonial Japan. Journals of eight soldiers have been unveiled for the very first time. The journals show how intense the training was, as well as the rules within academy life. Another diary includes 53 trumpet tunes played by the military band and an image of an army corps flag. The journals offer a valuable glimpse into the academy atmosphere. 240 cadets can also be clearly identified in the writings.

[Soundbite] KIM DO-HYEONG (Official, Independence Hall of Korea) : "The journals shed light in detail on how the men were trained and lived in the barracks."

Also being revealed, are four handwritten essays by Park Jong-soo who was a battalion commander at the academy. Initially, there wasn't enough money to open the academy, and Park is known to have offered his pineapple farm as land for the institute to be built on. The Korean Military Academy opened in August 1914, training independence fighters who took part in combat in Manchuria and Siberia.

[Soundbite] Dr. PARK MIN-YEONG (Independence Hall of Korea) : "The Korean Military Academy is a clear testament of trends in the years 1910-1920, when Korea was pushing for a war to gain back its independence."

The Independence Hall of Korea will publish a book of information on the Korean Military Academy. The Hall will conduct systematic studies on the organization and its efforts for national independence during the colonial era.

6. Arirang Mystery

[Anchor Lead]

Hearing the Korean folk song "Arirang" hardly stirs up controversy these days, but for unknown reasons it was prohibited under Japanese colonial rule. Now a new report sheds light on why the iconic song raised fear among the occupiers during that era.

[Soundbite] "Going over Arirang Hill."

[Pkg]

This version of "Arirang" was performed in January 1930 by singer Chae Dong-won. The lyrics are slightly different from the standard version. Lyrics about wishing for an abundant harvest are found at the end of verse 1, while the line, "You left me but you won't get far before you get into more trouble" is nowhere to be found.

[Soundbite] "Rich harvest, rich harvest, we ask for a rich harvest."

This version of "Arirang" sounds more upbeat than the original, which conveys the feelings of deep sorrow among the Korean people. The reason was revealed two years later. In an interview with a local newspaper the singer said that his record company removed the phrase, "You left me but you won't get far before you get into more trouble," because it sounded too controversial. At the time many Koreans were leaving for Manchuria and northern China to fight against the Japanese oppression. The Japanese changed the lyrics of "Arirang" in order to suppress the resistance.

[Soundbite] KIM YEON-GAP (Executive Dir., Arirang Association of Korea) : "The government general enacted restrictions on the song and used it to manipulate society."

But Koreans continued to sing the original version of "Arirang" and even added lyrics about national independence, prompting the Japanese to ban the sale of most music records containing "Arirang" in a bid to maintain social order.

7. Booming SUV Market

[Anchor Lead]

With the booming sport utility vehicle market in Korea, competition among domestic and foreign car makers is becoming fierce Here’s a look at some of the new models that may strike your fancy.

[Pkg]

This is the brand-new Kia Sorento, newly released by Kia Motors. The all-new version is a complete transformation of the previous model from five years ago. The new model was built lower and is longer to provide more seating space. Also, for the first time in the world, the SUV sports a sun roof made with carbon fiber-reinforced plastic. Kia says the vehicle has very high commodity value.

[Soundbite] JO YONG-WON (Director, Kia Motors) : "e're expected to easily achieve the monthly sales target of 5,000 units all year. From next year on, we aim to sell over 50,000 cars annually."

Foreign brands are also targeting Korea's SUV market, releasing new models one after another. Chrysler has introduced the all-new Cherokee, a revamp of the old model after seven years. A new BMW X4 and a partially-revamped X3 are already out, while a new X6 will be released by the end of the year. Mercendes-Benz has also released its compact SUV GLA. Foreign automakers have released four new SUV models this month alone. And with good reason. In the first half of the year, SUV sales in Korea have surged 20 per cent year on year, and the market continues to grow.

[Soundbite] KIM GEOM-JUN (Researcher, LG Economic Research Institute) : "As more Koreans enjoy outdoor leisure activities, they prefer vehicles with interior space that can be utilized in more practical ways."

With an array of options and pitches heating up, Korean consumers have more and more vehicles to choose from.

8. China Baduk Craze

[Anchor Lead]

In recent years Chinese players have shown noticeable improvements in the game of Go, or baduk as we call it in Korea. Driven by enthusiasm from children for the game along with government support, China may be taking away Korea's long dominance over this ancient board game.

[Pkg]

At this Chinese TV station, an open commentary session is underway to explain a professional Go match. The spectator seats are filled with children eagerly watching the commentary. It's a sight rarely seen in Korea.

[Soundbite] (ZHU KUNGYUPEI) : "Watching the games can improve my go-playing skills and make me smarter."

China is gripped by Go fever, just like Korea was twenty years ago when Koreans believed that learning the game, also called baduk, made a person smarter. This Go academy, which produced China's famed Go player, Xie He, has four branches in the city of Qingdao alone where roughly one thousand children are learning the game. These Chinese children started when they were just four or five years old, and they are the ones who will brighten the future of the game in China.

[Soundbite] (WANGZHICHEN) : "I'm an amateur third dan. It's been two and a half years since I started learning Go."

The Chinese government is keen on encouraging children to play Go. More than half of the elementary schools in China have included Go in their regular curriculum. When given the rank of professional first dan, they receive special privileges in admission to top-ranking colleges and major corporations. Such nation-wide popularity of the game has empowered Chinese players to overtake their Korean counterparts in recent world championships.

[Soundbite] HUANGYAN (Chinese Professional Fourth Dan Player) : "I think Chinese Go is improving faster, because there are more people learning the game in China than in Korea."

Korean baduk players are nervously watching the rapid rise of their Chinese competitors and fear that their dominance of the game may be taken away within the next few years.

9. Ready for Menopause

[Anchor Lead]

Women and menopause. If you’re not there, are you ready for it? Experts say there are plenty of golden years after this life event, so here are some health tips for women who will soon reach this milestone.

[Pkg]

Every woman experiences menopause. Korean women reach the menopause when they are 49 years old on average. Menopause refers to the cessation of women's reproductive ability and menstruation.
Many women are distressed at postmenopausal symptoms. Seventy percent of postmenopausal women choose to put up with those symptoms, thinking that they are just the result of the aging process. But it's better for these women not to hesitate and consult medical experts about their condition. This woman suffers from frequent hot flashes and palpitations. She went to a doctor and received several examinations to find the cause. The examinations show that her hormone levels are far below half that of normal women. Hormone therapy is very effective in treating this condition. There are various types of hormone therapy in different forms.

[Soundbite] Prof. CHOI HOON (Inje University Sanggye Paik Hospital) : "It is better for those with serious postmenopausal symptoms to receive hormone therapy. Different types of hormone therapy are applied based on whether they have the uterus or not. Women without the uterus need to take estrogen hormone pills. But those having the uterus should take progesterone pills with estrogen to protect the endometria."

More than 80 percent of postmenopausal women experience memory lapses, skin changes and a feeling of serious fatigue. One out of three start growing unwanted facial hair or experience severe perspiration. Along with these common symptoms, many women are prone to having various complications, following menopause. In particular, they should take extra caution to prevent cardiovascular disorders or osteoporosis. Menopause also causes mood swings and mental changes. Many women can easily slip into depression, thinking that they have lost their femininity. This woman suffered depression following menopause. But she overcame the condition through regular, routine physical activities. She basked in the sunlight and tended a garden on a daily basis. She changed her dietary habits, too. Women may feel lonely during the postmenopausal period if they think that they are understood by their loved ones. It is necessary for them to express how they feel and get help from their family members.

[Soundbite] JEONG BOK-MAE (Housewife) : "Communication with family members is very important. I think I could overcome the difficult period smoothly, thanks to my husband and two sons who were willing to actively help me whenever I asked for."

Spending time with friends as frequently as possible or starting new hobbies are good ways to prevent postmenopausal depression. Regular physical exercise helps postmenopausal women gain a positive view on life. Here are some yoga poses that help relieve menopausal symptoms. This is the bridge pose. Lie on your back with knees bent and then raise your hips. The pose helps boost bone density and strengthen the pelvis. This is the butterfly pose. Tuck both feet close to the groin and slowly bend your upper body down. It's good for reproductive organs and the bladder. Life changes after menopause. The quality of postmenopausal life depends on how you will address the changes. You can stay in good shape and enjoy your life if you are active in treating the symptoms.

  • Secret Meeting
    • 입력 2014-08-29 14:57:10
    • 수정2014-08-29 15:31:12
    News Today
[Anchor Lead]

We’ve just found out that earlier this month, a U.S. government official secretly visited North Korea in a military aircraft. And the news has led many to believe that Washington and Pyongyang might be ready to sit down at a negotiating table.

[Pkg]

A Washington official arrived in North Korea on a U.S. military aircraft on August 16. Sources say the official who stayed in Pyongyang for two days and one night, met with North Korean officials. A South Korean government official says that, as always, the U.S. military notified Seoul in advance about its plans to enter North Korean airspace. This is the first visit to Pyongyang by a U.S. government official in a military aircraft in two years. The topic of discussion between Washington and Pyongyang officials remains unknown. However, their meeting has led many to assume that the two sides might be ready for reconciliation. Some say that the officials probably negotiated for the release of three Americans including Kenneth Bae, held captive in the North. Washington declined comment on the talks.

[Soundbite] JEN PSAKI (Deputy Spokeswoman, U.S. State Department) : "Are you considering private bilateral talks with North Korea? Not that I know of or have heard of."

Meanwhile, some media sources say that a high-ranking North Korean official will soon visit New York for talks with the U.S. However, many skeptics also say the possibility for more North Korea-U.S. talks is low.

2. No Cheerleading Squad

[Anchor Lead]

North Korea has officially announced it will not send a cheerleading squad to the Incheon Asian Games opening in South Korea on Sep. 19. And that’s also thrown into question the prospects of a high-level meeting between the two sides.

[Pkg]

North Korea has announced it will not send a cheering squad to the Incheon Asian Games. Son Kwang-ho, vice chairman of the North's National Olympic Committee announced the decision on Chosun Central TV. He said that Pyongyang had planned to send a large cheering squad to the games aimed at improving inter-Korean relations but decided not to as South Korea raised issues over the dispatch.

[Soundbite] SON GWANG-HO (Vice Chairman, N. Korean Olympic Committee) : "We decided not to send a cheering squad to the 17th Asian Games as South Korea raised issue over the dispatch."

Son also said that North Korean delegates who visited the South last week for the Asian Games' group draw event informed South Korean organizers and officials at the time about this decision. But controversy has been raised, as the Unification Ministry announced that during the group draw event, the two Koreas only discussed matters related to the athletes and the North mentioned nothing about the cheering squad. On July 7, North Korea issued what it called a "government statement" announcing that it will send athletes and cheerleaders to the Incheon Asian Games. But ten days later during working level talks with the South, North Korean officials walked out of negotiations regarding the issues of cost and the size of the North Korean athlete and cheering squad. With the North's announcement that it will not be sending a cheering squad, the hope of seeing the two Koreas' cheerleading teams come together for the first time in nine years will have to be postponed. The last time this happened was during the 2005 Asian Athletics Championships in Incheon.

3. Returning Home

[Anchor Lead]

During Japan’s colonial rule. more than 30,000 Koreans were forced to work in mines on a remote Russian island. Even after Korea’s independence, they were forced to stay. But the remains of 18 of them have been brought to Korea so they can rest in peace.

[Pkg]

In the 1940's, more than 30,000 Koreans were forced by the Japanese to work in mines on the Russia's Sakhalin Island. Even after Korea's independence from Japanese colonial rule, these people could not return to their home because the Soviet government blocked all access to capitalist countries. The remains of 18 Koreans who died in Sakhalin have been brought to Korea. Their families carefully hold the urns with their remains wrapped in the national flag. Um Sang-heon, who was 15 when he was separated from his father, sent a petition to the Soviet government asking them for help. Now in his 80's, Um is finally able to bring his father back to his home country.

[Soundbite] EOM SANG-HEON (Son of Sakhalin Captive) : "He's now back after 73 years. Seventy-three years. He went to Sakhalin in 1941. He was forced to go there."

Of the 30,000 Korean captives forced to move to Sakhalin, 10,000 of their graves have been located. But only 19 of them have been brought to Korea. The remains of the first victim were brought last year by the Commission on Verification and Support for the Victims of Forced Mobilization under Japanese Colonialism.

[Soundbite] PARK IN-HWAN (Chief, Commission on Verification & Support for Victims) : "This is the first time we have ever confirmed the graves, excavated the remains in the presence of their families, as well as held funeral ceremonies in the traditional Korean way. It's very meaningful."

These deceased Sakhalin Koreans have finally returned to their home country after spending seven decades in a foreign land. Their remains were laid to rest in a national cemetery in Cheonan.

4. Blue Crab Season

[Anchor Lead]

The season of blue crabs is back. A fishing ban was removed early last week, allowing crab fishermen to haul in their catches from the Yellow Sea. Here's a look at how crab catchers are enjoying the sea's bounty.

[Pkg]

About sixty kilometers out from Sinjindo Port in Taean on Korea's west coast, brightly lit crab fishing boats come into view.

[Soundbite] "Now haul it up!"

Fishermen haul up traps filled with thrashing blue crabs. Even after picking out small, younger crabs, a 40-kilogram-capacity basket fills up quickly enough.

[Soundbite] KIM SEONG-BU (Captain, Crab Catching Boat) : "The fall season cannot even be compared with the spring. The catch is much bigger in the fall."

This fall's blue crab catch from the Yellow Sea is estimated to be around twenty-thousand tons, about the same as last year's abundant haul. The crabs caught overnight are brought into the port in the early morning hours. They are packed live and can be delivered throughout Korea within the day.

[Soundbite] SEOL BONG-SEOK (Official, Large supermarket) : "This year's fall crabs are so meaty and of such high quality that more than 60% of the catch can be sold in the market."

Large supermarkets competitively offering discounts on crabs are seeing long lines of customers eager to purchase the sweet fall crabs. Koreans will be able to enjoy the delicious crabs in season, thanks to the year's abundant catch and direct delivery and sales systems.

5. Joseon Military Academy

[Anchor Lead]

Hawaii may be a favorite vacation destination for Koreans, but 100 years ago, it was the site of a Joseon-era Korean Military Academy. Newly released journals outline the details of the life and training there and what the soldiers were fighting for.

[Pkg]

The men in this photo look alert and on guard in spite of their shabby uniforms. These photos were taken of some 300 members of the Korean Military Academy who gathered in Hawaii one hundred years ago, to fight for Korean independence from colonial Japan. Journals of eight soldiers have been unveiled for the very first time. The journals show how intense the training was, as well as the rules within academy life. Another diary includes 53 trumpet tunes played by the military band and an image of an army corps flag. The journals offer a valuable glimpse into the academy atmosphere. 240 cadets can also be clearly identified in the writings.

[Soundbite] KIM DO-HYEONG (Official, Independence Hall of Korea) : "The journals shed light in detail on how the men were trained and lived in the barracks."

Also being revealed, are four handwritten essays by Park Jong-soo who was a battalion commander at the academy. Initially, there wasn't enough money to open the academy, and Park is known to have offered his pineapple farm as land for the institute to be built on. The Korean Military Academy opened in August 1914, training independence fighters who took part in combat in Manchuria and Siberia.

[Soundbite] Dr. PARK MIN-YEONG (Independence Hall of Korea) : "The Korean Military Academy is a clear testament of trends in the years 1910-1920, when Korea was pushing for a war to gain back its independence."

The Independence Hall of Korea will publish a book of information on the Korean Military Academy. The Hall will conduct systematic studies on the organization and its efforts for national independence during the colonial era.

6. Arirang Mystery

[Anchor Lead]

Hearing the Korean folk song "Arirang" hardly stirs up controversy these days, but for unknown reasons it was prohibited under Japanese colonial rule. Now a new report sheds light on why the iconic song raised fear among the occupiers during that era.

[Soundbite] "Going over Arirang Hill."

[Pkg]

This version of "Arirang" was performed in January 1930 by singer Chae Dong-won. The lyrics are slightly different from the standard version. Lyrics about wishing for an abundant harvest are found at the end of verse 1, while the line, "You left me but you won't get far before you get into more trouble" is nowhere to be found.

[Soundbite] "Rich harvest, rich harvest, we ask for a rich harvest."

This version of "Arirang" sounds more upbeat than the original, which conveys the feelings of deep sorrow among the Korean people. The reason was revealed two years later. In an interview with a local newspaper the singer said that his record company removed the phrase, "You left me but you won't get far before you get into more trouble," because it sounded too controversial. At the time many Koreans were leaving for Manchuria and northern China to fight against the Japanese oppression. The Japanese changed the lyrics of "Arirang" in order to suppress the resistance.

[Soundbite] KIM YEON-GAP (Executive Dir., Arirang Association of Korea) : "The government general enacted restrictions on the song and used it to manipulate society."

But Koreans continued to sing the original version of "Arirang" and even added lyrics about national independence, prompting the Japanese to ban the sale of most music records containing "Arirang" in a bid to maintain social order.

7. Booming SUV Market

[Anchor Lead]

With the booming sport utility vehicle market in Korea, competition among domestic and foreign car makers is becoming fierce Here’s a look at some of the new models that may strike your fancy.

[Pkg]

This is the brand-new Kia Sorento, newly released by Kia Motors. The all-new version is a complete transformation of the previous model from five years ago. The new model was built lower and is longer to provide more seating space. Also, for the first time in the world, the SUV sports a sun roof made with carbon fiber-reinforced plastic. Kia says the vehicle has very high commodity value.

[Soundbite] JO YONG-WON (Director, Kia Motors) : "e're expected to easily achieve the monthly sales target of 5,000 units all year. From next year on, we aim to sell over 50,000 cars annually."

Foreign brands are also targeting Korea's SUV market, releasing new models one after another. Chrysler has introduced the all-new Cherokee, a revamp of the old model after seven years. A new BMW X4 and a partially-revamped X3 are already out, while a new X6 will be released by the end of the year. Mercendes-Benz has also released its compact SUV GLA. Foreign automakers have released four new SUV models this month alone. And with good reason. In the first half of the year, SUV sales in Korea have surged 20 per cent year on year, and the market continues to grow.

[Soundbite] KIM GEOM-JUN (Researcher, LG Economic Research Institute) : "As more Koreans enjoy outdoor leisure activities, they prefer vehicles with interior space that can be utilized in more practical ways."

With an array of options and pitches heating up, Korean consumers have more and more vehicles to choose from.

8. China Baduk Craze

[Anchor Lead]

In recent years Chinese players have shown noticeable improvements in the game of Go, or baduk as we call it in Korea. Driven by enthusiasm from children for the game along with government support, China may be taking away Korea's long dominance over this ancient board game.

[Pkg]

At this Chinese TV station, an open commentary session is underway to explain a professional Go match. The spectator seats are filled with children eagerly watching the commentary. It's a sight rarely seen in Korea.

[Soundbite] (ZHU KUNGYUPEI) : "Watching the games can improve my go-playing skills and make me smarter."

China is gripped by Go fever, just like Korea was twenty years ago when Koreans believed that learning the game, also called baduk, made a person smarter. This Go academy, which produced China's famed Go player, Xie He, has four branches in the city of Qingdao alone where roughly one thousand children are learning the game. These Chinese children started when they were just four or five years old, and they are the ones who will brighten the future of the game in China.

[Soundbite] (WANGZHICHEN) : "I'm an amateur third dan. It's been two and a half years since I started learning Go."

The Chinese government is keen on encouraging children to play Go. More than half of the elementary schools in China have included Go in their regular curriculum. When given the rank of professional first dan, they receive special privileges in admission to top-ranking colleges and major corporations. Such nation-wide popularity of the game has empowered Chinese players to overtake their Korean counterparts in recent world championships.

[Soundbite] HUANGYAN (Chinese Professional Fourth Dan Player) : "I think Chinese Go is improving faster, because there are more people learning the game in China than in Korea."

Korean baduk players are nervously watching the rapid rise of their Chinese competitors and fear that their dominance of the game may be taken away within the next few years.

9. Ready for Menopause

[Anchor Lead]

Women and menopause. If you’re not there, are you ready for it? Experts say there are plenty of golden years after this life event, so here are some health tips for women who will soon reach this milestone.

[Pkg]

Every woman experiences menopause. Korean women reach the menopause when they are 49 years old on average. Menopause refers to the cessation of women's reproductive ability and menstruation.
Many women are distressed at postmenopausal symptoms. Seventy percent of postmenopausal women choose to put up with those symptoms, thinking that they are just the result of the aging process. But it's better for these women not to hesitate and consult medical experts about their condition. This woman suffers from frequent hot flashes and palpitations. She went to a doctor and received several examinations to find the cause. The examinations show that her hormone levels are far below half that of normal women. Hormone therapy is very effective in treating this condition. There are various types of hormone therapy in different forms.

[Soundbite] Prof. CHOI HOON (Inje University Sanggye Paik Hospital) : "It is better for those with serious postmenopausal symptoms to receive hormone therapy. Different types of hormone therapy are applied based on whether they have the uterus or not. Women without the uterus need to take estrogen hormone pills. But those having the uterus should take progesterone pills with estrogen to protect the endometria."

More than 80 percent of postmenopausal women experience memory lapses, skin changes and a feeling of serious fatigue. One out of three start growing unwanted facial hair or experience severe perspiration. Along with these common symptoms, many women are prone to having various complications, following menopause. In particular, they should take extra caution to prevent cardiovascular disorders or osteoporosis. Menopause also causes mood swings and mental changes. Many women can easily slip into depression, thinking that they have lost their femininity. This woman suffered depression following menopause. But she overcame the condition through regular, routine physical activities. She basked in the sunlight and tended a garden on a daily basis. She changed her dietary habits, too. Women may feel lonely during the postmenopausal period if they think that they are understood by their loved ones. It is necessary for them to express how they feel and get help from their family members.

[Soundbite] JEONG BOK-MAE (Housewife) : "Communication with family members is very important. I think I could overcome the difficult period smoothly, thanks to my husband and two sons who were willing to actively help me whenever I asked for."

Spending time with friends as frequently as possible or starting new hobbies are good ways to prevent postmenopausal depression. Regular physical exercise helps postmenopausal women gain a positive view on life. Here are some yoga poses that help relieve menopausal symptoms. This is the bridge pose. Lie on your back with knees bent and then raise your hips. The pose helps boost bone density and strengthen the pelvis. This is the butterfly pose. Tuck both feet close to the groin and slowly bend your upper body down. It's good for reproductive organs and the bladder. Life changes after menopause. The quality of postmenopausal life depends on how you will address the changes. You can stay in good shape and enjoy your life if you are active in treating the symptoms.

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